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Topic: Green Storage (4 msgs / 116 lines)
1) From: Prabhakar Ragde
Here are some quotes from Tom's article on storing green coffee athttp://www.sweetmarias.com/greenstorage.html:"While many large commercial roasters vacuum pack coffee in
airtight plastic, green coffee might create condenstation and rot
over time. Large quantities of raw coffee are shipped in burlap sacks,
but we ship ours in zip lock polybags to ensure cleanliness and keep
costs down. [...] If you do not plan to use your Sweet Maria's coffee
within a month, pour the coffee from its ziplock bag into an ordinary
kraft paper bag and label it. If you have cotton cloth or burlap bags,
use them. Coffee needs to breathe so moisture cannot condense around
it, so don't lock it up in an airtight vault, tomb or cedar chest."
How does this gibe with vacuum sealing green beans in plastic bags or
mason jars? I don't mean to criticize methods that seem to be working
for people. But when I read this, way back at my first order a few
years ago, I ordered cotton bags from Tom, and that's what I keep my
green in, piled haphazardly into the original shipping boxes. --PR
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2) From: Mike McGinness
Quite simple really. There's a huge difference between storing in plastic
bags and vacuum sealing in plastic or glass or whatever. Vacuum sealing
evacuates not only oxygen but moisture. Condensation is not an issue.
Remember that prior to milling coffee greens are encased in parchment. The
encasement is considered the best way to store coffee prior to milling to
greens. My theory in vacuum sealing greens is to emulate the natural
parchment storage encasement.
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Frankenformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'

3) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of Prabhakar Ragde
< Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2003 5:28 AM
<
< Here are some quotes from Tom's article on storing green coffee at
<http://www.sweetmarias.com/greenstorage.html:<
< Coffee needs to breathe so moisture cannot condense around
< it, so don't lock it up in an airtight vault, tomb or cedar chest."
<
< How does this gibe with vacuum sealing green beans in plastic bags or
< mason jars? I don't mean to criticize methods that seem to be working
< for people. But when I read this, way back at my first order a few
< years ago, I ordered cotton bags from Tom, and that's what I keep my
< green in, piled haphazardly into the original shipping boxes. --PR
As did I, and if I had the right kind of storage space I probably would
still be storing in burlap or cloth or some kind.  However, I decided on
using mason jars for the following reasons:
 - Need to store in the basement, where the temperature stays reasonably
moderate.  I don't have air conditioning, so if I keep the beans
anywhere around the kitchen they're going to be subject to temps well
into the 80s in the summer, not to mention all the fluctuations in temp
and humidity as pots of water are boiled, the oven is used, etc., for
cooking.
 - So I need to store in the basement.  My basement is not the cleanest
environment.  It's full of dust, mold spores, spider webs, and the
spiders who made those spider webs.  I'm not putting coffee beans in
burlap in such an environment.  I'd probably wind up with some bizarre
beetle infestation or something, if not worse.
 - There is no way to get condensation or any other effect of the
atmosphere (besides temperature) inside of a vacuum-sealed container.
If the beans contain the moisture we're talking about, I suppose it
could be released over time and then condense on the surface of the
beans?  But something doesn't quite make sense in that scenario. (??)
So that's why I went with jars.  I have only been using them for greens
storage for maybe 6 months now, and truth be told I haven't yet had
beans shut up in vac-sealed jars for long uninterrupted periods of time.
Until maybe 2 months ago my stash was more of a "working stash" --
relatively small with frequent-enough turnover that any long-term
effects would not have had time to manifest.
I'll have to see how my beans survive this year in storage.  Another
factor which may sway the odds in my favor is that I live in a dry
climate, but again I doubt this will have much to do with what goes on
inside a vac-sealed container.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
---------------------------------
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4) From: Rick Farris
Lee wrote:
<Snip>
Vapor pressure!
-- Rick
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