HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Advice sought (11 msgs / 302 lines)
1) From: Fletch
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I'd like to buy a new grinder... one that is well made and will last a =
long, long time.  I'm willing to pay handsomely for it, for I am of the =
school that believes you get what you pay for.  I like trying lots of =
different coffees (I limit my coffee intake to espresso), and I  usually =
will pull several different flavors at a sitting.  Since there is no =
place to take my beans and go down the line trying one grinder after the =
next (particularly in the hills of Tennessee), as one shops for a new =
car, I'm left to what I can find to read about the subject and will put =
my cash on the barrel head hoping I eventually make a good blind choice. =
 Hence, this list seems like a good place to inquire and to draw on the =
knowledge of those who have more experience than I. A grinder like the =
Mazer Mini (or one of that ilk) seems as if it would last well and do a =
good job, but the doser is a big problem.  My guess is that I could =
grind enough for a pull of flavor 1, but to try to get flavor 2, it =
seems I'd be left with grounds in the works from the first grind, =
adulterating the flavor of grind 2.  I either live with ongoing =
adulteration or waste a lot of coffee to get a clean pull.  The Rocky =
Doserless grinder looks to be of pretty good quality, and may end up =
being my best choice, but it looks to me like it might be a bit too =
messy and likewise might waste coffee.  I've been using a Maestro, but =
in less than a year it's wearing out and needs to be replaced.  I'd like =
to find one of better quality rather than have to buy a new grinder =
every year or so.  It appears to me that the best quality is reserved =
for grinders of commercial quality with dosers where a shop grinds one =
or two flavors in large quantities and doesn't care about flavor =
adulteration.  Am I part of a niche that is just too unique to be =
serviced by a manufacturer or is there the perfect answer out there for =
me and I just haven't found it?  Your input would be appreciated.
Fletch 

2) From: sho2go
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Take a look at the doserless Innova.  Everything you're looking fore =
here.
Mike

3) From: Mike McGinness
Or the new doserless Rocky possibly. Of course as always, check out the
reviews on coffeegeek.com!!!
PNW HomeRoast List Gathering Info' URLhttp://home.attbi.com/~mdmint/coffee/pnwhrg.htmMM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Frankenformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'

4) From: Jim Schulman
Hi Fletch,
Whether you buy a good doserless or dosered 
grinder, the grounds path will always retain about 
2 grams of coffee. In the elephant-trunk doser-
less grinders, it will be in the trunk. In the 
cone style doserless grinders, it's in the cone 
and the exit from the burrs. In a doser grinder, 
it's in the nooks and crannioes of the doser and 
the exit from burrs. 
I have found NO difference in my experience, nor 
has anyone who has actually timed the cleanout 
periods, between clearing different grinder models 
-- it always takes about 20 to 25 seconds.
If your espresso machine is HX based, and you'll 
be making drinks for company, get a doser grinder, 
a doserless won't be able to keep up with the 
rush. If you have a single boiler machine, get any 
grinder you like, it won't slow you down.
Jim
On 2 Mar 2003 at 12:55, Fletch wrote:
<Snip>
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5) From: jim gundlach
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On Sunday, March 2, 2003, at 11:55 AM, Fletch wrote:
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be a 
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As far as I can tell the messy part of the Rocky was the doser.  Since =
I have taken the doser off mine, it is not that bad.  The path between =
the burrs and the exit is about as short as they get.   I think it is a =
mistake to have a doser on a home machine.  From what I can tell the =
owners of the Inova and Rocky both recommend the machine they own.  I 
own the Rocky so I recommend it.
    Jim Gundlach
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On Sunday, March 2, 2003, at 11:55 AM, Fletch wrote:
Arial The Rocky Doserless grinder
looks to be of pretty good quality, and may end up being my best
choice, but it looks to me like it might be a bit too messy and
likewise might waste coffee.
As far as I can tell the messy part of the Rocky was the doser.  Since
I have taken the doser off mine, it is not that bad.  The path between
the burrs and the exit is about as short as they get.   I think it is
a mistake to have a doser on a home machine.  From what I can tell the
owners of the Inova and Rocky both recommend the machine they own.  I
own the Rocky so I recommend it.
   Jim Gundlach
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6) From: Rick Farris
Mike wrote:
<Snip>
I, too, am looking (not very hard) for a high-end grinder, but for drip
coffee.  I already have a Mazzer for espresso.  I rejected the Rocky because
you have to hold down a button to make it grind.  That's not so bad for 14g
for a portafilter, but if I'm grinding 50g or 60g, I don't want to stand
there all day pushing a button.
-- Rick
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7) From: Jim Schulman
On my Innova doserless, I bypassed the PF switch, 
dismounted the forks, and ground into a bin using 
the on/off switch. Even for the 15 grams of a 
shot, I felt like a total idiot standing there 
pressing a button. One could probably do the same 
on the Rocky.
A plug in timer switch would have even been a 
better solution.
Jim
On 2 Mar 2003 at 22:37, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
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8) From: David Lewis
At 10:37 PM -0700 3/2/03, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
There are two switches on the doserless Rocky. Are you saying that 
it's your understanding that they're wired in series, i.e. that they 
both have to be on in order to grind? That would be a somewhat odd 
design, although hardly a first.
	David
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9) From: Ben Treichel
There is a power switch, and then a grind switch. Whats odd about that?
David Lewis wrote:
<Snip>
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10) From: David Lewis
It would make it more useful to be able to run the grinder with 
either switch, as is done with the Maestro and Pavoni grinders.
At 10:57 PM -0500 3/3/03, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Less than 0.1 percent of the U.S. population gave 83 percent of all 
itemized campaign contributions for the 2002 elections, according to 
the Center for Responsive Politics.
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11) From: Rick Farris
David wrote:
<Snip>
That's what I read over on a.c.  The main on/off switch is just an enabler
for the front (momentary action) switch.  Unlike the Maestro, where you can
use either the timer switch or the momentary action switch.
-- Rick
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