HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OK, newbie's first question (#1) (13 msgs / 378 lines)
1) From: john roberts
I didn't turn anything up in a quick Google search so I though I ask this
group.
This morning while driving to an early morning 5k, I drank some excellent
fresh brewed Guatemal Acetenango (roasted yesterday). I was drinking from my
trusty travel cup, which I haven't used since before ratcheting up my coffee
quality.
Perhaps it was just the comparison of good coffee to what I remembered
drinking (in the car), but the flavor seemed to really pop while slurping
from the top of the travel mug... which begs this question: I know there's a
great deal of art/science around the proper shape and design of wine glasses
and to a lesser extent beer glassware. Is there any such consideration for
coffee cup shape/design to maximize the presentation of the coffee to the
palate? Or is this just a technique issue (tomorrow I'll try slurping from
my trusty house mug).
Of course it will be years before my cup is the weakest link, but this
inquiring mind wants to know.
JR
This email has been scanned by Internet Pathway's Email
Gateway scanning system for potentially harmful content,
such as viruses or spam. Nothing out of the ordinary was
detected in this email. For more information, call
601-776-3355 or email emailscanner

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Style counts!
See:http://home.attbi.com/~mdmint/coffee/royal4four.htm(For those this is a repeat, sorry:-)
On my way to brew after dinner ISH Americanos...
MM;-)
FrankenFormer Rosto Roastin' - Royally Balance Brewin'
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin' too!
PNW HomeRoast List Gathering Info' URLhttp://home.attbi.com/~mdmint/coffee/pnwhrg.htm

3) From: John Abbott
JR,
Yep, and they do make a difference.  I quit using mugs a long while back
except for 9 ounce pours.  Tom has a pretty impressive array of the proper
shape cups.http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.espresso.shtml You can invest a
great deal into a great set of cups - I'm sure Mike McKoffee will be up
before I get this posted with his overkill.  But if you do a Google on
espresso cups you'll find them all over the globe and all over the range of
budgets.
John 36

4) From: John Abbott
I just knew you'd have this posted before I could get my reply up.  Poor JR
is going to withdraw in terror after looking at your Royal.  Wow, what a
leap from a plastic commute cup to a crystal cup - it would break my budget
for sure.
I'm amazed at the price delta on cups. I found 2 ounce shot glasses for as
much as $18 for a plain glass - I paid $1.50 for mine.  Then there were the
designer cups - $150 for a set of four - another for $500 a set of four.  I
love my Mexican cups and I paid about $35 for a complete set down there.
John - Drinking from my H. Van Grove cup at the moment

5) From: Jim Schulman
I'm probably the wrong person to answer this, 
since I usually end up with a dab of foam on my 
nose from going to deep into my cappuccino ... But 
I like the traditional wide mouthed cups, since 
the smell of the brew is a large part of the 
experience. It could be that one of those trumpet 
shaped wine tasting contraptions would be even 
better for smell, but I've never seen a cup in 
that shape.
Jim
On 29 Mar 2003 at 21:34, john roberts wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Ed Needham
I can't imagine anything more diametrically opposed to Kona Mike's Royal
Four, but my favorite mug is a hand tossed pottery mug I bought in a little
pottery shop at the Yellow Banks Recreation Center,http://www.yellow-banks.com/pottery.htmnear Lincoln State Park up in
Indiana.  I took a picture of it for show and tell.http://www.homeroaster.com/mug.jpgIt's very tall and it should only be filled half way.  There is no handle,
but instead, there are
indentations for grasping above the heat.  The extra height allows the aroma
of the brew to stay in the mug.  I bought two of them, but I may have to buy
more to assure I'll have a long term supply.
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!http://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

7) From: David Lewis
At 9:34 PM -0600 3/29/03, john roberts wrote:
<Snip>
One constant when people do official cupping is a powerful slurp that 
atomizes the coffee all over the palette. Perhaps you were 
accidentally duplicating that with the travel mug. It's something one 
is more likely to do in the car than in polite company. Maybe, as 
with slurping wine, we can educate people to recognize this as a sign 
of sophistication. Maybe we can just succeed in making our families 
regard us as even stranger than they already do.
Best,
	David
-- 
Less than 0.1 percent of the U.S. population gave 83 percent of all 
itemized campaign contributions for the 2002 elections, according to 
the Center for Responsive Politics.

8) From: Myron Joshua
Ed, it IS a very nice mug! It looks like it is more suitable for
Tea-something Far Eastern and more airy about it.
I am sure the emotional investment the potter put into it is as high as the
emotional investment of the lovely and very different Royal Four.
Just two different cultures that coffee manages to bridge in its special
way.
Thanks for sharing the pic with us.
Myron

9) From: Ed Needham
Far East tea would be served in something like that?  Cool.  Do you have a
link to a description of that tradition?
I'm sure I could enjoy Mike's company and the coffee from his Royal crystal.
The Royal brewing fanfare pretty much demands elegance though, and it would
be very odd to serve Mike's coffee in my mug, and just as weird to serve my
Chemex brew in Mike's finely cut crystal.  There's a time for all things.
Mike...What does your everyday coffee cup/mug look like?
One added feature of my tall, thick mug...Since it is so tall, cool, outdoor
breezes don't cool it off nearly as fast as a more 'open' mug.  My back deck
is where I find peace and solace with my three golden retrievers, a porch
swing, a newspaper and a good cup of coffee, so that is a 'feature' I
appreciate.
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!http://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

10) From: Angelo
David,
Excellent point. I've heard it said that in noodle shops in Japan you can 
hear most everyone slurping their noodles and soups..
In Italy, espresso is often taken with an audible intake of air, and in one 
gulp. Could it be that the aftertaste(and buzz) is more appreciated  than 
the taste one gets from sipping slowly and surreptitiously?
There's a scene in the Godfather II, where DeNiro has a sit - down with the 
foppish Don, whom he is about to dispatch to a better place. The Don picks 
up his espresso and flamboyantly slurps it in one grand gulp....
I sometimes think I would like to do it this way when dinning out, but with 
espressi going for upwards of $2, and of dubious quality, I resist the 
impulse...I do, however slurp at home as I find that it does improve the 
taste of most liquid foods....
Ciao,
Angelo
Snip..
<Snip>

11) From: John Abbott
Angelo,
 I'm with you!  I learned the value of slurping at of all places an olive
oil tasting.  I was taught by the gourmets that you cannot experience the
oil in any other way.  So I began to apply that to coffee and it really
opened up the flavor. I then found that in competition cupping the coffee is
slurped and then spit out.  I haven't ever been able to spit out good
coffee - So I  would make a lousy cupping judge.
John - slurping is good - coffee in a Texas restaurant is bad

12) From: Joe Dickens
>>Ed, it IS a very nice mug! It looks like it is more suitable for
>>Tea-something Far Eastern and more airy about it.
 
I'd say that looks more like some kind of fusion design. Almost all Asian teacups that are taller than they are wide are found at restaurants (for the purpose of lessening the number of refills maybe?). To look at Japanese (who do slurp noodles, including cold ones) examples of regular teacups just do a Google search for "chawan." In olden times the same bowls were used for tea and rice, and the word is the same, but as this is a coffee list I'll stop here.
 
It (the posted one) is a great cup, though, wish I could find one like that around here. The best cups I've found are some heavy pottery ones from Mexico under the name of "Mara." They hold heat really well, and my favorite one has a rather unusual handle as tall as the cup that makes it easy to get an effortless grip, and a warm one during the winter. Anyway, need to get to class, take care all.
 
Joe
Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*

13) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 10:37 3/31/2003, Joe Dickens typed:
<Snip>
That is amazing.  Just finishing my cup of Timor, I flipped my mug over and 
"Design by Mara - MEX".  It is my favorite mug also.
Wondering about coincidence and how consistent the mug is, is "Mara" more 
than just a single person?
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalt


HomeRoast Digest