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Topic: Too many variables +newbies second question.. and sundry rambling (4 msgs / 163 lines)
1) From: jim gundlach
On Friday, April 4, 2003, at 10:25 PM, john roberts wrote:
<Snip>
If this list splits, it will probably be into the art of coffee 
roasting versus the science of coffee roasting camps.  When people face 
too many variables, the artist decides to let go of the details and 
proceeds by letting the experience saturate their senses and trusting 
their intuition to guide them through the process.  The scientist will 
add an additional measuring device and seek to control one more 
variable.  I've ended up going the art route because I cannot afford 
all the measuring/control devices I can think of.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama

2) From: john roberts
In audio there is a similar division between the "meter readers" and "golden
ears". I guess I'm more of a scientist than an artist, but I am not a fan of
micro management or unnecessary complexity.
I guess I purchased a grinder with 17 or whatever settings, not because I
needed that many, but that I didn't trust a cheaper version with three
settings to have one that's actually right.
I don't doubt that roasting can be as complicated as one is willing to make
it. I am already pleased, but not necessarily satisfied, with the results of
a single regulated inlet air temp and variable time. Next I will look at the
possibility of improving that by also sensing an endpoint (exit air) temp. I
hope to use this to automatically terminate the roast.
Maybe in the future if I have too much time on my hands I'll look into
training a computer chip with a microphone to recognize the sound of coffee
cracking, etc... right now with my gourmet it makes so much noise I can't
hear myself think let alone the coffee.
Enjoying a nice cup of Kona... have a good morning.
JR

3) From: Ed Van Herik

I'm still a novice at this, but I've found that I much prefer roasting by sight and sound, putting me in the "artist" class. For me, roasting coffee is a fun sensory experience, and, because I'm a novice, I can hardly go wrong no matter what I do. (ANY roast will broaden my experience.)

That said, I've had good success with my techniques, crude though they be. Although, at some point, I'll probably start monkeying around with temperatures...

Ed Van Herik evanherik   >From: jim gundlach >Reply-To: homeroast >To: homeroast >Subject: Re: Too many variables +newbies second question.. and sundry rambling >Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2003 07:53:40 -0600 > > >On Friday, April 4, 2003, at 10:25 PM, john roberts wrote: > >>As if I needed more variables, I recently ordered a burr grinder... >>so now I >>will have 10+ different grinds to deal with too, but one doesn't >>start home >>roasting to simplify things... the path to perfection is full of >>many >>choices. > >If this list splits, it will probably be into the art of coffee >roasting versus the science of coffee roasting camps. When people >face too many variables, the artist decides to let go of the details >and proceeds by letting the experience saturate their senses and >trusting their intuition to guide them through the process. The >scientist will add an additional measuring device and seek to >control one more variable. I've ended up going the art route >because I cannot afford all the measuring/control devices I can >think of. > >Jim Gundlach >roasting over pecan wood fires >in La Place, Alabama > > >homeroast mailing list >http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast >To change your personal list settings, see >http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html
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4) From: David Lewis
At 8:52 AM -0600 4/5/03, john roberts wrote:
<Snip>
This is something I've wondered about. Specifically, there's a fairly 
cheap high-temperature microphone with the signal processing in it, I 
think: it's an automotive knock sensor, designed to screw into the 
block and detect the sharp sound of engine knock. I've always 
wondered if one would detect coffee cracking as well.
Best,
	David
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