HomeRoast Digest


Topic: newby observation... the accidental profile (3 msgs / 118 lines)
1) From: john roberts
I recently read a 45 page article about how to modify a Gourmet roaster.. it
turns out the thrust of the exercise was to increase the roaster's capacity.
My interest is in temp control for better roast quality.
I have been on a one pot a day habit for years, and since I am on the steep
part of the learning curve and feel I would benefit from more experiences, I
have limited my roast size to just enough for one pot (approx 1/2 the
Gourmet's capacity).
I didn't think much of the fact that I couldn't get a dark roast without
adding time to the maximum setting, as I was using a replacement circuit
board, I assumed the temperature it was regulating to might be low.
I later added a thermometer and found the air temp was closely regulated to
430'F.
One thing I did learn from the 45 page article is that the roast vessel/air
flow pattern is tuned for a given quantity of beans. By under loading my
Gourmet I was reducing the heat transfer to the beans.... in fact I did have
one batch that did not finish, and it was small beans that I may have
slightly under loaded beneath my normal 1/4C or so... I was able to dial in
another several minutes and get them to finish.
Connecting the dots, I decided to fill the Gourmet to 1/2C per their design
and see if it would work better. It certainly ran hotter. Not only do the
beans sit lower in the roast chamber but the screens in the chaff catcher
were almost completely blocked. Now I have not run enough batches to
correlate how much shorter the time should be for equivalent roasts, my
initial impression is that the smaller batch roasted longer, definitely
tasted better (more complex/subtle flavors).
Having all this good coffee around has caused me to deviate from my one pot
a day rule, so I could easily live with 1/2 cup batch size. However I am not
enthusiastic about the short roast cycle. Since I still have the original
circuit board that failed I am thinking about fixing it and tweaking it to
make the temp adjustable. However the idea of standing over my roaster with
a stopwatch and adjusting the temperature isn't my idea of how to improve my
quality of life. Also since it's a hot chassis design I don't like the idea
of bringing a potentiometer that isn't double insulated out where a human
(me) could touch it. Plan "B" is adding some simple circuitry that would
allow me to step through temperature presets... I figure I could get 10 2+
minute steps. I could start with 2-4 min at 300' (just to clear the moisture
from the beans), until I get smarter I'm tempted to step from there to 430'
and use the manual timers to set total roast time....
I did look for that good espresso book, but only found copies in Japan and
Canada and am not ready to come up with that much yen just now. Without IR
sensing of bean temp (all I'm sensing and regulating is air temp) I have no
idea of how to accurately implement the profiles I've seen published.
But right now, I'm not looking for perfection. As long as I can continue to
make incremental improvements my life will continue to get better....
JR
the just adding a temperature control is not my idea
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2) From: Jeff Pitblado
John,
On 23 Apr 2003 at 14:47, john roberts wrote:
<Snip>
Could you post the address of this article?
Thanks!

3) From: john roberts
http://my.execpc.com/~n9zes/homeroast/GourmetReview.PDF


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