HomeRoast Digest


Topic: My first roast... (18 msgs / 515 lines)
1) From: Brice D. Hornback
Hello everyone.  I'm new to this list.  Actually, I've been reading the
archives and have been subscribed for a week or so.  I've really been
enjoying it!
Today, my copy of "Home Coffee Roasting" by Kenneth Davids arrived.  As soon
as I got home from work, I grabbed it and started reading.  I couldn't put
it down!  Page after page... it's an incredible book!  I couldn't wait to
start roasting!  I have a Poppery II (black version) I got off eBay which
arrived a couple days ago.  All I needed was some beans.
Well... today... my first green coffee beans arrived from Sweet Maria's.
I've been staring at my Poppery II for a couple days now in anticipation of
the beans arriving.  Since I really don't know much about coffee (yet) I
ordered the 8-pack Sampler.  I randomly grabbed one of the bags (Mexican
Chiapas - Strictly Altura), measured out 1/3 cup (2.55 oz.) and headed
outside with the Poppery II to roast a small batch of fresh coffee.  :-)
I plugged the Poppery II into a surge strip to provide an on/off switch.  I
poured in the coffee beans, put the top on, and turned on the "roaster".  At
first, the beans just sort of wiggled around in there.  After a little bit
they started swirling around.  Within a couple minutes, I could see darker
beans floating to the top as lighter beans were pulled under for their turn
in the deep heat.  About six minutes after I started, I heard first crack!
Actually, I had to listen closely at first because I didn't really know what
to expect.  It did *not* pop like popcorn!  Just the occasional "snap" and
then that stopped.  A couple minutes later I decided I was probably going to
burn it so I shut off the "roaster" and immediately poured the beans into a
metal pot and stirred until they were cool.  They were a nice medium brown
and dry (Regular City?)
Okay... I *know* they are supposed to "rest".  Nope.  Not this time.  As
soon as they were cool to the touch (less than five minutes), I ground them
(sorry... Braun whirly blade type) and brewed the FRESHEST cup of coffee
I've ever had in my life!  How did my first attempt at roasting beans taste?
HEAVENLY!  After I enjoyed the incredible brew, I read the info on Sweet
Maria's site about the coffee.  Yep!  EXACTLY as described!
I've NEVER tasted coffee that tasted like this before.  I don't know how you
folks can describe how coffee tastes so well.  To me, I don't know the
words.  This coffee was poetry... beyond words... beyond description.  It
was intoxicating.
Okay... I'm hooked.
Best regards,
Brice
Indianapolis, IN

2) From: miKe mcKoffee

3) From: Simpson
Thank you Brice, for a great tale of adventure. It took me back to the days
of staring into my popper, chaff in my hair and being stoked on the
excitement of this whole new world of wonderful tastes and smells. Well
said, and welcome to one truly cool hobby!
Ted
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 4/25/2003 at 10:31 PM Brice D. Hornback wrote:
great tale regrettably snipped
<Snip>

4) From: Mike Gallant
On Friday, Apr 25, 2003, at 20:31 US/Pacific, Brice D. Hornback wrote:
<Snip>
	Welcome! Sounds a lot like my "first time" (except I was using a 
Popcorn Pumper :)
	Don't forget to grab your handbasket on the way in...
-mike

5) From: Ed Needham
Well, hey Brice, welcome to the Indiana coalition.  There are several Indiana
and surrounding area homeroasters.  I think there are one or two from the
Indy area.
Ed Needham (New Albany, Indiana)
To Absurdity and Beyond!http://www.homeroaster.comed
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6) From: The Scarlet Wombat
Brice, welcome to the world of addiction...er, I mean coffee roasting.
Dan

7) From: mikejfoley
Welcome to the list Brice, and yes, you've hooked yourself well!  ;>)
           Happy Roastin', Mike F.

8) From: Brice D. Hornback
Thanks to everyone for the great welcome to the list!  Unfortunately, I only
roasted that first batch last night which I quickly consumed.  So, this
morning... since I have to leave in a few minutes to take my son to a
baseball game (his first of the season) with no fresh coffee roasted... I'm
drinking stale, pre-ground, coffee from a can.  Talk about a big difference!
It's difficult to swallow.
Okay... now I need a good coffee maker.  I'm using a BUNN GR10 (black) that
will brew a good cup or a bad cup (it doesn't care what I put in it) in
under three minutes.  Anyone have an opinion of this one?  I don't recall
reading much about drip coffee makers in the archives.  Maybe I need to grab
a Bodum french press later today after the game.
What's the logical next step?  How do I make a "better" cup of coffee than I
can now?
Best regards,
Brice

9) From: Dave Huddle
Brice,
Welcome to the list. I can see that you're hooked!
I use the BUNN GR10 nearly every morning.  Decent brew, quick, and doesn't 
require much thought.
When I have more time (and am more wide awake) I'll use a vacuum brewer, or a 
Chemex, or a french press, maybe a moka pot or a flip-drip.
Nice thing about the BUNN - it is simple to use for that first cup.
Dave	Westerville, OH 
<Snip>

10) From: John Abbott
I'll add my welcome Brice!   
I will have to admit to being extremely lazy in the mornings and enjoy
just staggering out into the kitchen and pushing the button on the Solis
Master (SM5K) and then finding a place to sit.  Before the Solis took
over, we used to alternate between Press Pots and Cona Vacuum.  Press
Pots work  extremely well, require little thought and produce killer
coffee.  The Cona requires patience and a little more prep but the cup
it produces is extraordinary - and its fun to watch. 
I would go for the press pot next Brice.  You will learn about grind and
extraction using it.  Now the problem is "what size?"
John - really loving life in the slow lane (our over night low was 81) 
 
On Sat, 2003-04-26 at 09:21, Dave Huddle wrote:
    Brice,
    
    Welcome to the list. I can see that you're hooked!
    
    I use the BUNN GR10 nearly every morning.  Decent brew, quick, and doesn't 
    require much thought.
    
    When I have more time (and am more wide awake) I'll use a vacuum brewer, or a 
    Chemex, or a french press, maybe a moka pot or a flip-drip.
    
    Nice thing about the BUNN - it is simple to use for that first cup.
    
    Dave	Westerville, OH 
    
    > Okay... now I need a good coffee maker.  I'm using a BUNN GR10 (black) that
    > will brew a good cup or a bad cup (it doesn't care what I put in it) in
    > under three minutes.  Anyone have an opinion of this one?  I don't recall
    > reading much about drip coffee makers in the archives.  Maybe I need to grab
    > a Bodum french press later today after the game.
    > 
    > What's the logical next step?  How do I make a "better" cup of coffee than I
    > can now?
    > 
    > Best regards,
    > Brice
    

11) From: Dale A. Taylor
Brice, welcome to the list. You helped a lot of us think back on our first
adventure. Well said..... Dale Taylor

12) From: Dale A. Taylor
Brice I use a french press almost every morning. They are reasonable in cost
and quick in the morning. Doesn't take much thought to prepare when half
awake. dale
Okay... now I need a good coffee maker.  I'm using a BUNN GR10 (black) that
will brew a good cup or a bad cup (it doesn't care what I put in it) in
under three minutes.  Anyone have an opinion of this one?  I don't recall
reading much about drip coffee makers in the archives.  Maybe I need to grab
a Bodum french press later today after the game.
What's the logical next step?  How do I make a "better" cup of coffee than I
can now?
Best regards,
Brice
homeroast mailing listhttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings, seehttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html

13) From: Ed Needham
I've got a Bunn too, but use it only for convenience.  My wife gets up first
and doesn't want to fuss with all the manual stuff.  I drink it, but always
wish she'd use one of my better methods of making good brew.  I prefer Chemex
drip (a manual pour-over similar to Melitta), but others like the press pots
and vac pots.  I think the vac pots are a bit too fussy, but that's not the
opinion of most here.  Press pots (French Press) make a thick, very full
bodied brew.  Each to his/her own.
I occasionally like to drink espresso or even diluted espresso (an
Americano), which tastes like a wonderful cup of regular drip coffee, only
better.
Take your pick and enjoy.
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!http://www.homeroaster.comed
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14) From: Myron Joshua
: Brice D. Hornback  asked:
<Snip>
I  can now?
LOGICAL?? Yep, you are right that there are logical steps that can be
taken...but as we all know from your great story, that you followed your gut
and did not wait for the beans to rest. I was a fool and did the logical
thing on my first roast...I waited. HOW STUPID OF ME!
I think the french press is the right move for full flavor and feel for
nuances. But, as you already seem to know...moving from a whirlyblade to a
burr grinder is crucial!
Best and ENJOY!!!, myron

15) From: Mark
<Snip>
I'll second that, with the additional recomendation that, if you're in the
market for a burr grinder, get a good one now. It'll cost more, but you'll
save money in the long run, because you'll end up buying one later anyway. I
love my Mazzer Mini, but for most it's overkill (actually, it's overkill for
me, but I wouldn't give it up). I hear (almost) nothing but good things
about the Rocky. If I were just starting, that's what I'd get. If you're
certain you'll never do espresso, Solis grinders are a good choice. But
don't be too quick to assume you'll never do espresso. If you love coffee
(which you obviously do), once you've had really *good* espresso, you'll be
hooked.
Mark

16) From: jimgundlach
Brice,
     Welcome to the list.   You are off to a good start.  Home roasting 
good coffees brings you to a whole new world of flavor.  Here are some 
suggestions on how to improve the experience.
The first thing to do is read Tom's reviews of the coffees you have as 
you explore the sample pack.   Then, use the ratings to find and order 
other coffees with similar rating profiles.  When you order, order at 
least two pounds of each coffee you try so you will have enough to 
experiment with the way you roast.  For example if you find your 
preferred coffee from the sample pack is rated higher in body and 
flavor than brightness (acidity), then look for other coffees that have 
a similar rating profile.  Do not focus on the highest total number.
Almost everyone on the list will agree that the important first upgrade 
is your grinder.  Go the archives of this list and read the nearly 
endless discussion and then buy the Rocky.
Again,  welcome to the list.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
On Friday, April 25, 2003, at 10:31 PM, Brice D. Hornback wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 05:18 4/28/2003, jimgundlach typed:
<Snip>
Or if your budget will not allow that, a Zass hand grinder.  Nothing like 
working for your coffee.
<Snip>
Yes, welcome aboard.
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalt

18) From: Marty Wooten
Brice,
Welcome to the coffee journey from Muncie, IN. 
Thank you for sharing your first roast, how it brings back such sweet
memories of the start of my own experience.
Marty Wooten
Scheduler
mwooten
phone 765-741-3130 fax 765-741-3135
1403 S. Liberty St.
Muncie, In 47305


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