HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Tips on stove top roasting? (4 msgs / 99 lines)
1) From: Michelle Brown
Husband just bought a stovetop popcorn popper to roast with.  Had a sample
of some Kenya AA and so far he's pleased with it, but he wants suggestions
on what other types work well with stovetop roasting.  He is also looking
for a color chart and something to help with the timing to get the proper
roasts for the different beans.
Any help would be appreciated.
Michelle

2) From: Martin Lipton
Here's the particular sweetmaria info page for stove poppers.  But hang out
on their entire site.   It's the place to start.  Also get Kenneth Davids'
book, "Home Roasting."http://www.sweetmarias.com/stovepopmethod.htmlSubject: +Tips on stove top roasting?
<Snip>http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html

3) From: Steve Wall
I pretty much follow the starting temperature described in Tom's
"Time-saving method" on the stovetop method page.  I'm using an
electric stove and I set the popper inside a cast iron pan to
spread the heat.  I time the roast by sound and temperature
on my 5" thermometer.  Stovetop popping should give you a
good chance to hear first and second crack.  First crack is
easy even with my exhaust fan running and the whirley pop
cranking.  To catch the first sounds of 2nd crack I turn off
the fan at around the 10 minute mark and I stop cranking every
15-30 seconds to listen for cracks, if I want to go that far.
Second crack usually starts at about 12 minutes for me so
If I'm shooting for a City roast I'll stop the roast at
11 minutes or so.
Saturday night I roasted some Kenya Kiawamururu and some
Papua New Guinea (PNG), and I'll be blending them as my daily
brew this week.  Very nice, but I don't think the PNG was
rested quite enough for the flavors to really bloom yet.
I like Kenya blended with Sumatra, as others have mentioned
recently, maybe just a bit more than the Kenya/PNG.
Steve Wall
On Monday, May 12, 2003, at 08:38 PM, Martin Lipton wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Bill Cutts
I do most all of my roasting with a Whirley Pop on the side burner of my
grill. Roasting profile varies with the seasons but I always get a roast
better than what I can buy locally.
I bring the temperature inside the Whirley Pop up to around 500 degrees with
the burner on high. Add the beans (about 1 and 2/3 cups by volume, 5 1/3 cup
measures allow me to vary my blends to suit) and leave the burner on high
until the temperature decrease from the addition of the beans has
stabilized. I then reduce the temperature to just keep a steady increase. I
primarily drink espresso and take most of my roasts just until second crack
is starting to roll.
The sounds of the cracks are easy to hear with a Whirley Pop. I'd suggest
that your husband do a few roasts based on the sounds and pay attention to
the smells of the roast and the temperature while he's doing that. After a
few roasts I think he'll feel very comfortable to experiment on his own.
The only downside to home roasting is that now it's almost impossible to get
coffee that I'm happy with away from home.
Bill


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