HomeRoast Digest


Topic: aging of roasted coffee (5 msgs / 172 lines)
1) From: Bob Howell
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I have read much about the aging of roasted coffee, but would like to =
learn more of the conditions of aging.
When 24 or 48 hours delay before usage is mentioned, are we talking =
about leaving the roasted coffee uncovered or sealed, or both.
What I have been doing is leaving it uncovered 4 to 12 hours and putting =
then putting it in sealed jars for a day or two.  With the many =
variations I have been
experimenting with the combinations of timing plus type of roasts (light =
city, city, full city, french) that it is going to take me decades to =
figure it all out.
Could we have imput here from those that are happy with their results.
I am in Mexico and am limited to the coffee available here in Nayarit. =
(El malinal, cofradia, San Miguel, Mesillas, El Guayabal, El Morrow, =
etc)  I have never tasted anything else (these, to the best of my =
knowledge are all Arabica types and grown at altitudes of 500 to 1500 =
meters).
Bob Howell
Rincon de Guayabitos
Mexico

2) From: john roberts
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After roasting I dump the beans into sealed Tupperware containers and rest
at room temperature either 24 or 48 hours depending on how fast I'm drinking
what I roast....  sometimes I will open the container before 24 hours just
to smell how it's coming... there is a remarkable difference between
immediately after roasting and over time. Smelling good coffee is one of the
pleasures of home roasting.
JR

3) From: jimgundlach
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On Saturday, May 24, 2003, at 05:59 PM, Bob Howell wrote:
<Snip>
I will always try a new coffee about as soon as it is cooled and a 
couple of times a day just to see how it ages.  I always store in a 
covered, but not sealed, jar.  I find Tom's monkey blend and the Uganda 
are fine within 24 hours, the Amber and Sumatra's seem to need 48 or 
even a little more.  In general such "rules" are at best guidelines 
that can be violated at will.
Jim Gundlach
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On Saturday, May 24, 2003, at 05:59 PM, Bob Howell wrote:
ArialCould we have imput
here from those that are happy with their results.
I will always try a new coffee about as soon as it is cooled and a
couple of times a day just to see how it ages.  I always store in a
covered, but not sealed, jar.  I find Tom's monkey blend and the
Uganda are fine within 24 hours, the Amber and Sumatra's seem to need
48 or even a little more.  In general such "rules" are at best
guidelines that can be violated at will.
Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-6-348913396--

4) From: John Abbott
    On Sat, 2003-05-24 at 18:14, jimgundlach wrote:
    .  I find Tom's monkey blend and the Uganda 
    > are fine within 24 hours, the Amber and Sumatra's seem to need 48 or 
    > even a little more.  In general such "rules" are at best guidelines 
    > that can be violated at will.
    > 
    > Jim Gundlach
Jim,
Isn't the greatest pleasure in roasting and brewing to have coffee tuned
to our personal tastes - after all, we've all already rejected the
choices of the commercial folks.
Like you, I find myself more and more intrigued by the changing flavor,
and enjoy pulling shots throughout its short life.   I find that almost
all of my coffee is immediately good, and hits a real sweet spot
somewhere in the next 48 hours.  It is a rare thing that beans get to
see much more than 72 hours beyond the roaster.
My bottom line (spreading a bit) I'm extremely satisfied with my roasts.

5) From: Ron
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Snip from Bob Howell:
I have read much about the aging of roasted coffee, but would like to =
learn more of the conditions of aging.
Bob nice to hear from you again. I find that fresh roasted coffee, needs =
resting to develop body and flavor. I will rest my coffee 24 to 72 hrs. =
I find that most need at least 24 hrs. and others need more. I rest mind =
in Mason jars, and after 24 hrs I seal them with a Food Saver Vac =
sealer. If you are doing Espresso, with a pump machine you can enjoy the =
roasted coffee with less rest, but for drip brew, it needs at least 24 =
hrs. good luck and take notes, trying coffee at different intervals from =
early on.
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC


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