HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New Hottop (26 msgs / 674 lines)
1) From: Fulton Martin
--On Thursday, July 03, 2003 12:06 -0700 "Rick Farris (home)" 
 wrote:
<Snip>
Speaking from my own experience... You may find that you can't get a batch 
size that large dark enough (depending, of course, on how dark you want 
it... 8-)) In that case, dividing that 5# by 9 gives 252 grams / batch, 
almost exactly the "design point."
Fulton Martin
fulton
__=o&o>__
San Diego, CA

2) From: Jeff Braman
Hi All,
New Hottop arrived today!!! Unpacked and quickly read directions and
Tom's "tip sheet", even though I had already read!
Assembled the "guards", removed the cover to check drum and shaft and we
are ready to roast.
Pre-heated  per instructions (drum started turning and element heating!;
set to 4; Hottop beeped, poured in Columbian Beans, supplied with unit
and we were roasting; 7-8 min beans starting to turn; 1st crack at
around twelve, first crack led to second in about 2 min and I ejected!
Cooling was amazing; after cycle beans, were ambient
temperature.....amazing.
Let unit rest and then measured 250 grams of PNG Arkora AA, my favorite
coffee and started the process all over; roasting time about the same.
(set initially to "7" and ejected at about 14 min)
Am using a Variac at 120VAC; may adjust to 100 V as 1st begins, to
slightly extend as Bob Y suggested.
Definitely will lubricate as has been suggested; not "real" noisy, but
definitely an occasional "metal to metal" noise.
Hottop definitely works as advertised, taste test comes soon!
Off to roast Rwanda 7, because of all the good comments!
Jeff B

3) From: alfred
Congratulations on your new arrival:
Sounds like you really got a "hot one" with the times you refer to.With the
newer models the roast times at a given setting or to first crack seem to be
getting much shorter.
Randy Glass suspects that the newer models have a hotter heating element.
I sure that many Hot Top owners would like a clarification on this.

4) From: Jeff Braman
Rawana Masaka "7" = roasted; Variac at 120VAC; 1st crack @13:52, 1st
finished @15:30 2nd just beginning 16:05 = ejected. 
As I roasted and pondered the Hottop; regarding the discussion about
reduced AC Voltage and Motor and Electronics, would believe that the
control panel with LED's may be DC voltage run from a transformer, often
"controls" are DC operated; (lower or higher voltage won't generally
affect the DC being transformed) as suggested the motor shouldn't be
affected by 10VAC higher or 20 or so lower.
My initial impression of this unit is very good; overall construction
seems very robust and the initial "runs" were excellent.
My endeavors with a FR+8 (variac) and a Caffe Rosto (variac) were great
learning experiences and the coffee produced was good; my frustration
was with the ability to "repeat" a roast and also to  extend the roast
time without baking the coffee.
Hottop SEEMS to be the ticket; I appreciate all of your input as I have
scoured the archives for related posts; the discussions and review were
great.
Thank You,
Jeff Braman

5) From: Robert Avery
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Well .... graduated from the I-Roast to the Hottop and what a change =
... Nice Roast. Not that I didn't get a good roast with the I-Roast =
.... just a different concept as most know. The roaster did however =
raise some questions ..... Why would you even need the filters on board. =
... Trying to understand the function. Also .... surprised no one has =
came up with a better transfer method from the cooling tray to what ever =
storage container one would be using ????? Any input .... ???? Maybe =
there are some real good answers to these issues. Later, Bob

6) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I pour from the cooling tray into my flat tray from my scale. Then using =
the supplied funnel into a Mason Jar.

7) From: Jeffrey Bair
I also am a new Hottop user, and my greatest challenge has been all the
chaff that's still left in with the beans. Any great solutions for that?
Jeff
On 1/11/06, Robert Avery  wrote:
<Snip>
t a
<Snip>
ons
<Snip>
and
<Snip>
er
<Snip>

8) From: Robert Avery
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Actually Jeff ... I didn't have that problem. The first batch I did was =
Bugisu and the second was De-Caf. The Decaf wasn't for me ... it was for =
a friend. There was almost no chaff with that. The other wasn't bad at =
all ... and there was virtually non in the beans when they dumped. =
Later, Bob

9) From: Joe M
I use a metal colander and scoop the beans up and let them trickle back 
down while I blow the chaff out of the colander, do this 
outside....works fine and as a plus a free pulmonary workout...!
Jeffrey Bair wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
No chaff problem either. Roast outside breeze blows it all away

11) From: Dave Brandes
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I take the cooling tray outside, where I shake and blow.  Voila, no more
chaff.  
 
Be sure you don't allow the chaff to build up too much in the back of the
drum area.  This can lead to a fire.
 
The filters are relatively ineffective for the smoke, but do slow down any
natural circulation that can occur that might affect temperature stability
or consistency.
 
Transferring from the cooling tray has never been a problem for me.  I place
a hand on each side with the palms providing a narrow opening as I tilt the
tray toward me.  Haven't lost a bean on 2 years.
 
You'll notice the same roasts in a drum machine will not produce quite as
bright a coffee as the air roaster.
 
Have fun!
 
Dave  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Bair
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2006 3:36 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +New Hottop
I also am a new Hottop user, and my greatest challenge has been all the
chaff that's still left in with the beans. Any great solutions for that?
 
Jeff
On 1/11/06, Robert Avery  wrote: 
Well .... graduated from the I-Roast to the Hottop and what a change ....
Nice Roast. Not that I didn't get a good roast with the I-Roast ..... just a
different concept as most know. The roaster did however raise some questions
.... Why would you even need the filters on board. .... Trying to understand
the function. Also .... surprised no one has came up with a better transfer
method from the cooling tray to what ever storage container one would be
using ????? Any input .... ???? Maybe there are some real good answers to
these issues. Later, Bob 

12) From: Zara Haimo
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<Snip>
more chaff.  
Someone also gave me a small, battery operated personal fan - about the =
size of a cell phone with soft blades so you can't possibly hurt =
yourself.  It works great to blow away the chaff - I put the tray down =
outside, stir the beans with one hand and hold the fan in the other =
while the chaff blows away.
I also find that any leftover chaff I missed tends to stick to the mason =
jar or the coffee scoop where it's easy to rinse or wipe off.

13) From: DJ Garcia
I use my hands to constrain the beans from the cooling tray to the
funnel and into the jar with no problems.
DJ

14) From: B. Scott Harroff
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I think in the stock hot top the roast chamber fan is used to help control
(remove heat) from the chamber at the end of the roast - not sure though.
The filters keep "fresh" air coming in though the top and help control air
flow (and maybe even humidity) and prevent chaff from blowing out the back.
The same filler tube that you use to put beans into the roaster lends itself
nicely to dumping them from the cooling tray to a SM vac bag.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Robert Avery
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2006 4:28 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +New Hottop
Well .... graduated from the I-Roast to the Hottop and what a change ....
Nice Roast. Not that I didn't get a good roast with the I-Roast ..... just a
different concept as most know. The roaster did however raise some questions
.... Why would you even need the filters on board. .... Trying to understand
the function. Also .... surprised no one has came up with a better transfer
method from the cooling tray to what ever storage container one would be
using ????? Any input .... ???? Maybe there are some real good answers to
these issues. Later, Bob

15) From: Steven Van Dyke
I use a canning funnel to pour into the mason (canning) jars I use to hold
my roasted coffee.
For some reason it works so well you'd think it was made for it! ;)
Enjoy!
Steve :->

16) From: Robert Avery
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks Dave .... That's what I thought on the filters as well. Hum !!!! =
Other than that very pleased. Thanks again, Bob

17) From: Robert Avery
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
All good thoughts .... smoke comes out of the in feed opening, which I =
feel would be expected. I think the the filters allow some buffering of =
the heat like you were saying. I noticed the exhaust fan cycling during =
the process so I'm sure that's aiding in controlling the heat. Thanks =
for the comments, Bob

18) From: Espressoperson
In a message dated 1/11/2006 4:30:05 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
raverys12 writes:
Well .... graduated from the I-Roast to the Hottop and what a change ....  
Nice Roast. Not that I didn’t get a good roast with the I-Roast ....=
. just a  
different concept as most know. The roaster did however raise some questions=
  
.... Why would you even need the filters on board. .... Trying to understand=
  
the function. Also .... surprised no one has came up with a better transfer =
 
method from the cooling tray to what ever storage container one would be usi=
ng  
????? Any input .... ???? Maybe there are some real good answers to these  
issues. Later, Bob
Enjoy your Hottop. The fan pulls a lot of smoke out through the  back of the=
 
machine. The filter takes particulate matter out of  that smoke. So no less 
smoke with filter, but cleaner smoke. Just look  at a used filter and see wh=
at 
might be in the air if you go without  filter. All this may be less of a fac=
tor 
for you if you roast out of doors  but is more of a concern for indoor 
roasting. 
 
 
MichaelB

19) From: Espressoperson
In a message dated 1/11/2006 4:36:33 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
jbbair writes:
I also am a new Hottop user, and my greatest challenge has been all the  
chaff that's still left in with the beans. Any great solutions for that?
 
Jeff
Learn to love the chaff; for me it has become a badge of home  roasting. You 
got beans, you got chaff. I do nothing to get rid of  chaff beyond using a 
hand vac to clean up whatever gets left behind  after transferring between 
containers. 
 
I store my coffee in glass jars and measure and grind into different size  
stainless steel containers. The chaff is a visual indicator of the  invisible 
oils that are on the surface of the containers and a reminder that  they need 
cleaning whether you can see the buildup or not.
 
MichaelB

20) From: Robert Avery
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Good point Michael .... I roast outdoors. So it really isn't an issue. I =
had a toss up on buying this machine .... but glad my  choice was this =
machine.  Thanks for the comments, Bob

21) From: Jeffrey Bair
Thanks for your thoughts Michael. I do similar, but I also have found that
if I put the roasted beans into a tupperware-like bowl and shake it up the
static will pull alot of the chaff out before moving them into the mason
jar. I roast indoors with a strong exhaust vent (downdraft) and have found
the hand vac to be an invaluable tool.
Should I be concerned about chaff affecting the taste of my coffee? That's
been my concern.
Thanks for everyone's great advice.
Jeff
On 1/12/06, Espressoperson  wrote:
<Snip>
ng
<Snip>
en
<Snip>
ble
<Snip>
eed
<Snip>

22) From: paulsack
Quoting Jeffrey Bair :
<Snip>
I went on a tour of the Intelligentsia roastery in Chicago, and one of the
roasters talked about this. He said he made a cup of tea entirely out of chaff
once and that it was completely tasteless. So I imagine a little bit of chaff
mixed in with coffee wouldn't affect the taste of coffee at all. 
(But I haven't actually tasted chaff tea myself.)
I have a friend from Brazil (who disliked coffee at the time) who warned me
against home coffee roasting because he thought the chaff was poisonous. (But
now he is a home-roast convert.)
-Paul

23) From: Sandy Andina
The major commercial coffee companies routinely grind chaff in with  
their crummy beans all the time--you can see it when you open a can  
of Haxwell Mouse or Foalturds.
On Jan 12, 2006, at 11:58 AM, paulsack wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

24) From: Justin Marquez
On 1/11/06, Joe M  wrote:
<Snip>
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

25) From: McConnel
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
For outdoor roasting I don't see a need for filters--I have not observed =
any temp stability issues. I pulled the paper out of the frame and =
reinserted it a long time ago.
I pour beans into the machine and from the cooling tray using aluminum =
foil breadpans bought from the supermarket--I pinch them into desired =
funnel shapes and replace as needed--they're cheap.
I suck chaff out of the partially slid open chaff tray several times =
during the roast depending on how much is being produced using a shop =
vac. This helps, but then when I pour it into the breadpan I like to =
pour it into either a natural breeze or doing it whilst walking.
Warning: don't inhale floating chaff it tends to stick in one's throat.

26) From: John Fellowes
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I use a brillo pad for a filter.
I use two plastic collanders, one with a handle, one without and there =
is peg that helps clip them together, then just like the song, I shake =
it all about.  I had to go to a few stores to find the combination and =
one with gig eough holes to let the chaffe out.
John Fellowes
Gibsons B.C.


HomeRoast Digest