HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Advice Needed (21 msgs / 338 lines)
1) From: Dean Powers
Hello,
I am new to the list. I joined because about 10 months ago I went to
work full time for a new nonprofit that works with the families of
missing children. It is very rewarding but being new we donít have a
great cash flow. So I am low paid and even at times have to forgo a
paycheck all together. I knew this when I came on board and knew that if
I was going to do it that I was going to have to make some cut backs in
my life. So gone are the car payments and any car that full coverage
insurance would be worth carrying. Gone too are the 2 or 3 meals out a
week. Gone are so many things. The one thing that I WILL not give up is
good coffee. I will be dang  if I am going to drink anything out of a
can (EVER)
So I was told that if I roasted at home it would stretch my coffee
dollar. (AND get a better cup of coffee)
So I need some advice on what would be a good (and cheap) way to get
into home roasting? Also what is a good cheap grinder. I have to really
state that low priced is very important. I know that I canít buy the
best or even one of the best, but what you say would be the best AND
lowest priced way to get into home roasting?
Thank You
Dean Powers
Want to help when a child is missing?http://www.fourthekids.org

2) From: drg
The cheapest way to roast is in a pan, I use a wok, that you already have.
You may not be able to do this because of smoke detectors or others
complaining about smoke.   I made do for about 6 months with a cheap whirly
blade grinder that I picked up at a garage sale for 50 cents.  Brewing is
another issue.  I never liked drip pots or percolators so I sprung for a
French press for about $8.00 at a large kitchen supply store.  Over time,
I've acquired a nicer grinder, Solis, and brewing tool, Coffee Gaggia, which
have improved the coffee but by far the biggest improvement in the coffee
experience was the shift to fresh home roasted coffee bought from Tom.  When
I made that change, the cost of my coffee actually declined.  Even after
adding the nicer grinder and espresso machine, I don't think I am spending
as much as I used to for really bad coffee.
    Jim Gundlach
      Roasting in a wok
         on a wood stove
            burning oak
               in Shorter, Alabama
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3) From: Michael Allen Smith
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The Westbend popper!  The popper goes for $10-$25.http://www.ineedcoffee.com/content/1999/04/homeroast.aspAs far as grinder goes, Target sells a Braun for less than $20.  It grinds
pretty well if you pulse it for a few seconds instead of holding it down for
longer than 6 seconds.  3 seconds grind, stop, 3 seconds grind, stop.  After
a little practice, you'll be able to get the perfect grind for any brewing
equipment.
mas

4) From: Mark

5) From: Dean Powers
Thank you. I picked up a grinder yesterday at a thrift store. ($1.25)  It was
brand new. It still had a card in the box where someone had gotten it for a
gift.. Wondered if I should have sent them a thank you. lol
But I really want to thank everyone who written with advice. I can't wait to
roast.
Dean

6) From: Dean Powers
MAS,
Thanks for the advice on the grinder. I found a new one at a thrift store. I
have a question. How do you clean it after use? I was telling a friend about
buying it and he said that they are hard to clean. He said something about using
cornmeal???????
THANK YOU!
Dean
Want to help when a child is missing?http://www.fourthekids.orgMichael Allen Smith wrote:
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7) From: Seth Goodman
 
At 03:57 PM 4/3/00, Dean Powers wrote:
<Snip>
What kind is it -  a burr grinder (two rotating disks, like a flour mill) 
or a whirlybird (two little blades that spin, like a blender)?
If it's a burr grinder, I would recommend running about two tablespoons of 
raw, dry white rice through it.  This will leave just a  tiny bit of rice 
powder residue in the works - which you can just ignore.
If it's a whirlybird, I've always been able to clean them with a damp rag.
HTH,
Seth Goodman

8) From: Michael Allen Smith
A trick I use to minimize cleaning is on the last pulse, while holding the
lid tight, spin the grinder upside down.  Once upside down, pulse it again
and the coffee will fall into the lid and away from the blades.  Slowly pull
the lid off and it acts as a coffee basket.  Hence, there is nothing left to
clean.
The only time I need to clean is when I make a fine grind for espresso.  A
lazy mans way to clean this is to use lighter roasted beans ground in the
above manner.  Not sure about the cornmeal, that sounds like work.  I've
been doing the upside down pulse method for almost 10 years.
mas
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I
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about
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using
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9) From: Robert Cantor
you can use rice or saltines.   if you leave them coarse they're easier to clean.
Bob C.
rcantor

10) From: peggykozy
Dean, the easiest way is to put in chunks of white bread and whirl
away.  I break a slice up into quarters and whirl each quarter and empty
between each quarter.  Takes out all the oil too in addition to the
coffee.  Birds just love this.

11) From: Paul Goelz
At 06:19 PM 4/3/00 -0400, you wrote:
<Snip>
Hmmmm..... am I the only one who NEVER cleans his whirlyblade grinder?  The
current grind cleans out the remains of the previous one just fine for me.
I grind every day, so nothing stays long enough to make much difference??
BTW, my "pulse" method differs from what was recently posted.  My grinder
can get to full speed in about a second, so I pulse for about 200 mS on and
maybe 800 mS off.  In other words, I never let the blade accelerate past
maybe 30% of maximum speed.  Just bouncing the finger on the button does it.  
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
pgoelz at eaglequest dot com
Videoastronomy and music web site:http://www.eaglequest.com/~pgoelz

12) From: DonaldO763
<Snip>
No, I just thump it on the side to shake out the leftovers.  I use it at 
least twice a day, once for morning brew, and once for nightly decaf.
PS.  I also brutalize the grinder, by thumping it once or twice on the 
counter to knock the coffee back in the bowl before I open it.  Otherwise, 
the coffee goes all over the place.
Don,
HWP, Whirly-blade, auto-drip

13) From: Dean Powers
I thought that the pulsing was to keep the motor from heating up the coffee as
you grind it. Is there another reason to pulse?
Dean
Paul Goelz wrote:
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14) From: Paul Goelz
At 10:52 AM 4/4/00 -0500, you wrote:
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coffee as
<Snip>
I pulse to keep the grinder from grinding too fine.  The fineness of the
grind is in direct proportion to the speed of the blades.  I have never
believed that the blades heat anything enough to make a difference, but
that's just my opinion.  
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
pgoelz at eaglequest dot com
Videoastronomy and music web site:http://www.eaglequest.com/~pgoelz

15) From: Ken Mary
Dean,
Pulsing is used by "coarse grind devotees" as a way to control the grind
size by limiting the blade speed. To see how good you are, spill the grounds
onto a white dish and count the boulders. To heat up coffee grounds with a
blade grinder may take about 5 or 10 minutes for any perceived increase. If
this is bad then why use hot water to brew coffee?
I say hammer down, full speed ahead. But this is my preference. The coffee
in the middle of those boulders is wasted.
I am curious now. I have some old 8 O'Clock beans in the freezer. I will try
to measure the increase in temperature with a thermocouple after running the
blade grinder. There is no reason to assume when one can measure. I may even
brew the results and take a sip.
--
Ken Mary - Mars Pennsylvania - Aromaroast - whirlyblade - French Press
The Angry Philosopher is [ IN ]  Email your non coffee questions.
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16) From: Dean Powers
I understand. I use a cone filter so fine grind is ok for me. I just started
so I have a lot to learn.
Dean
Paul Goelz wrote:
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17) From: Dean Powers
Sorry this email got mixed in with a bunch of others.
Thanks for the advice.
Dean
Seth Goodman wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: MMore
I know that this is a list for "home roasters", but I was wondering if I 
could draw upon the wealth of knowledge available here for some assistance.  
I've been on this list for almost 2 years and have come across many who have 
different levels of experience.  I have been planning on and looking for the 
right opportunity to open up a coffee shop/micro roaster business.  The 
opportunity appears to have presented itself.  As such, I'd like to see if anyone out 
there has any experience in this sort of start up.  You can reply off list if 
you like so we don't clutter up this list with non home roasting issues.  
Specifically:
What's the best company to deal with in terms of Raw goods (green beans) at 
this level of production?
Best Roaster?
Equipment - Lease or buy?  What makes for espresso machines, coffee makers, 
grinders.
Start up costs?
Any other issues you might think are relevant.
Thanks so much in advance for your help.
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.

19) From: William G Teags
I would like to see the responses kept on the list - a few of us are 
contemplating the same move.
- emigrantBean
Message: 19
From: MMore
Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 11:48:41 EST
To: homeroast
Subject: +Re: Advice needed
Reply-To: homeroast
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
I know that this is a list for "home roasters", but I was wondering if I
could draw upon the wealth of knowledge available here for some 
assistance.
I've been on this list for almost 2 years and have come across many who 
have
different levels of experience.  I have been planning on and looking 
for the
right opportunity to open up a coffee shop/micro roaster business.  The
opportunity appears to have presented itself.  As such, I'd like to see 
if anyone out
there has any experience in this sort of start up.  You can reply off 
list if
you like so we don't clutter up this list with non home roasting issues.
Specifically:
What's the best company to deal with in terms of Raw goods (green 
beans) at
this level of production?
Best Roaster?
Equipment - Lease or buy?  What makes for espresso machines, coffee 
makers,
grinders.
Start up costs?
Any other issues you might think are relevant.
Thanks so much in advance for your help.
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.

20) From: Verdova Bishop
I second that motion.
Verdova

21) From: Brett Mason
I agree also - I have been roasting and selling a tiny bit, and am
certainly contemplating the move to a small business....
On Mon, 3 Jan 2005 11:32:29 -0700, William G Teags  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!


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