HomeRoast Digest


Topic: blending question (52 msgs / 1922 lines)
1) From: Fookoo Network
 
This is undoubtedly a very basic question.  But after roasting and assuming 
that one is going to mix the roasted beans together, is there any 
particular technique to this besides dumping the beans into a bowl and 
stirring them up?  I assume that this is stirred, not shaken?  :>))
                                                           Carl

2) From: Kathleen Tinkel
I don't think there's any special technique to blending.
But because I'm usually experimenting with a blend (either its constituents
or the proportions of each bean), I usually store each type of bean
separately - put them in stainless cannisters as soon as they're roasted.
Then when I'm ready to grind, I measure out the proportion of each variety
I want in the blend.
Kathleen

3) From: Simpson
I wish I could reference the person who mentioned this, but the neatest idea
for blending that I've heard is to brew (cup) the beans apart and then add
teaspoons of the various brews together in the ratios that you want to test
for a blend... 1 tsp this, 4 tsp that and so on. Can test many blends
quickly. Thanks to the original source, whoever that was...
Ted
<Snip>

4) From: Glen Sutherland
I think that can be attributed to Donald N. Schoenholt.
Peace,
Glen
ICQ 34239611
Drago Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus
Abit BX 6r2 1.8v | PIII 700 | Alpha PAL-6035

5) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Dec 25, 2003, at 12:44 AM, Timothy Reaves wrote:
<Snip>
Nope,
    But I do blend a wok roasted bean with beans that have been roasted 
over a wood fire.
         Jim Gundlach

6) From: Ed Needham
I've done an air roast in my Hearthware Precision (HWP) and blended it with a
drum roast from my grill roaster.  Results were excellent.  Balanced and
complex.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

7) From: Elliott O'Reilly
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I regularly blend Sumatra, Mokha & Java roasted on different roasters.  =
I roast the Sumatra and Java on an Alp.  The Mokha I roast on a =
Hearthware Precision because the beans are too small for the Alp.  I =
have actually compared my blend to a similar blend from a local shop =
with a Probat commercial roaster (much like Tom's at SweetMaria's) and =
my blend was at least as good if not better.  Of course, that shop is =
not quite as picky about it's bean lots as Tom seems to be.
Elliott O'Reilly  
St. Louis

8) From: miKe mcKoffee

9) From: Ed Needham
I had the same experience when I brewed all four samples together.  Wonderful
cup.  Better than any one by itself.
I think that's why some are pleased with uneven roasts.  It makes for a more
complex cup.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

10) From: Bill Collings
I purchased a coffee a while back before converting to SM.  It is Papua New 
Guinea Garoka Highlands.  It's not too bad but seems real mild and smooth 
just not up to SM's standards.  It seems to me that this could make part of 
a breakfast blend.  I love coffee with chocolate undertones.  Any 
suggestions?
By the way, I appreciated all of the helpful suggestions on my low blood 
sugar attacks after drinking coffee.  Using sugar instead of Splenda helps 
immensely.  In fact almost 100%.  Still too scared to drink extra coffee, 
but I'll get there.
Thanks
Bill Collings
Don’t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search! http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/

11) From: Bill Collings
I purchased before I started buying from SM a "Papua New Guinea Garoka 
Highlands"
that I'm not real fond of.  Not bad but real light and smooth as if 
something is missing.  I like a breakfast blend.  Any ideas?
Thanks
Bill Collings
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12) From: Erik Gilling
Bill Collings wrote on Wed, 02 November 2005 19:25
<Snip>
ummmmmm.... guess this makes the mailing list software a really naughty boy.
-Erik

13) From: mIke mcKoffee
So all List members who received your post are "required" to destroy it when
it's stated need is fullfilled? (Yeah, I actually read your lengthy
confidentiality disclosure) Hah! Just for that I'm NEVER going to delete
it!-)
As for your question for blending blah beans, well I'd give or throw them
away. Or use them in Spanish roast plus experiments!
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net 
<Snip>

14) From: Jeff Anderson
I roasted some Kenya Nyeri Ruiruinu Peaberry a little too long. I didn't 
destroy the coffee, and it doesn't taste burned. In my limited 
experience it's what I would call a very light Vienna roast. But it 
almost completely eliminated the wonderful bright and fruity 
characteristics of the coffee. Luckily it was only @5 ounces. I assume I 
can use it in a blend, but the lone blending experiment I've attempted 
was a miserable failure. So I'm hoping I can get some suggestions about 
what blends I could try, and in what proportions.
The other coffees I have on hand are: 1) Brazil Organic-Fazenda 
Jacaranda, 2) Colombia Supreme 15943, 3) Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, 4) 
Costa Rica Tarrazu-La Minita, 5) Ethiopia Harar Horse, lot 14659, 6) 
Sumatra Organic Gayo Mountain Special, and 7) India Monsooned "Elephant".
I've only been blending @6 weeks, and at first I was crushed. I love the 
Kenya. Then I thought of blending potential and felt a little better. 
Then I realized that six weeks ago I would have thought this was 
wonderful coffee just as it is, which indicates how much I've learned 
already, and felt great. It's a good lesson, not a disaster after all, 
and that's great, too.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions, and for being here. I've learned 
a lot from all of you in just a few short weeks, and I look forward to 
learning a lot more.

15) From: Brett Mason
I would just give it away to someone who will still be astounded... move on
to what you like...
When blending, use coffees you like...
Don't ruin coffee you like with coffee you don't...
Sorry,
Brett
On 9/26/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

16) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Or roast another batch of the same Kenya targeting City so and give a
mélange brewing a go... I wouldn't mix it all at first.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2007 5:03 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Blending Question
I would just give it away to someone who will still be astounded... move =
on
to what you like...
When blending, use coffees you like...
Don't ruin coffee you like with coffee you don't...
Sorry, 
Brett
On 9/26/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote: 
I roasted some Kenya Nyeri Ruiruinu Peaberry a little too long. I didn't
destroy the coffee, and it doesn't taste burned. In my limited
experience it's what I would call a very light Vienna roast. But it 
almost completely eliminated the wonderful bright and fruity
characteristics of the coffee. Luckily it was only @5 ounces. I assume I
can use it in a blend, but the lone blending experiment I've attempted
was a miserable failure. So I'm hoping I can get some suggestions about
what blends I could try, and in what proportions.
The other coffees I have on hand are: 1) Brazil Organic-Fazenda
Jacaranda, 2) Colombia Supreme 15943, 3) Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, 4) 
Costa Rica Tarrazu-La Minita, 5) Ethiopia Harar Horse, lot 14659, 6)
Sumatra Organic Gayo Mountain Special, and 7) India Monsooned =
"Elephant".
I've only been blending @6 weeks, and at first I was crushed. I love the =
Kenya. Then I thought of blending potential and felt a little better.
Then I realized that six weeks ago I would have thought this was
wonderful coffee just as it is, which indicates how much I've learned
already, and felt great. It's a good lesson, not a disaster after all,
and that's great, too.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions, and for being here. I've learned
a lot from all of you in just a few short weeks, and I look forward to 
learning a lot more.-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

17) From: Barry Luterman
If coffee is no good it doesn't get better if it's blended. However, if 
coffee is just not to your taste it can blend beautifully. For instance, I 
find Kenyans to be a little too bright and I find DP coffees to be a little 
too earthy. However, these two coffees blended in the correct proportion are 
great.

18) From: JoAnne Phillips
Oh boy!  Can I relate to that!  When I did my first roast it was well  
into second crack before I could get my act together and dump it --  
smoked like a house fire.   LOL  I ground it and drank it and was in  
7th heaven.  Today I'd be in tears if I did that to any of my beloved  
Kenyas.  We do live and learn, and learn, and . . . . . .  Ain't it fun?
JoAnne in Tucson where it is cooling down.
On Sep 26, 2007, at 4:48 PM, Jeff Anderson wrote:
  Then I realized that six weeks ago I would have thought this was  
wonderful coffee just as it is, which indicates how much I've learned  
already, and felt great. It's a good lesson, not a disaster after  
all, and that's great, too.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions, and for being here. I've  
learned a lot from all of you in just a few short weeks, and I look  
forward to learning a lot more.

19) From: Jeff Anderson
I'm going to try this one more time, and then I'll leave you alone. I 
promise! I thought that since some of you have been roasting for as many 
as 25+ years, some of you might have a lot of blending experience. I 
thought I might could get some specific suggestions, but mainly I want 
to learn something. Learning is my goal, not salvaging 5 oz of coffee. I 
appreciate the 2 suggestions I've gotten so far, but they're not 
specific at all.. In a melange of two different roasts of the same 
coffee, do I use mostly Vienna, or mostly City? Or !/2 to 1/2? 1/3 to 
2/3? 1/4 to 3/4? Is that the best way to go, or would the other 
suggestion be better? If so, what proportion DP with Vienna? Which DP?
I ruined some coffee earlier in a "winging it" blending effort, but 
again, I'm mostly trying to learn something. Am I asking the wrong 
people, and if so, can someone point me to some information? I don't 
have time to read a book. The coffee is already 3 days old. And maybe 
it's stupid, but I don't want to give away something I'm not willing to 
drink myself. Pitching it won't bankrupt me, and drinking what I've come 
to regard as a little bland and boring won't kill me, either.And either 
way, I'll forget it soon. But it would be nice to learn something.
In the hope that someone can teach me something with a specific 
suggestion or two, here's the list again: The other coffees I have on 
hand are: 1) Brazil Organic-Fazenda Jacaranda, 2) Colombia Supreme 
15943, 3) Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, 4) Costa Rica Tarrazu-La Minita, 5) 
Ethiopia Harar Horse, lot 14659, 6) Sumatra Organic Gayo Mountain 
Special, and 7) India Monsooned "Elephant".
 
In case you need more info, I read something Tom wrote somewhere that 
Vienna roasts tend to lose a lot of the single origin qualities, and 
that seems to be what happened here. The coffee is not ruined, it didn't 
turn burn or turn black, and there was very little smoke. The beans are 
the color of a FC+ roast, but the surface is very slightly oily, which 
indicates based on what I've read that it went a bit past FC+ into a 
light Vienna roast. This is also confirmed by the pictures Tom provides 
on his website. I have read that people often roast a Vienna either 
because a particular coffee makes a particularly good Vienna that will 
stand on it's own, or for blending. Based on everything I've learned so 
far, this is a good, light Vienna roast, but it's not a great Vienna 
roast. I say this because it seems kind of boring, and IMHO doesn't 
stand on it's own. Very decent coffee, just boring.

20) From: miKe mcKoffee
First the dark roasted Kenya in question is now at 3 days rest. Have you
tried it now that it's only just now approaching (IMO) properly rested for
full flavors developing?
Learning how to blend wise I agree with Tom that before attempting blending
it's important to first know each individual SO including various roasts of
each SO. Then knowing how various coffees taste as SO one can extrapolate
blending the tastes in their mind before testing actual blends. Personally I
didn't really even start playing with blending until roasting two or three
years. Exploring coffee's infinite complexities is a marathon not a sprint!
Blending rules are really simply this: whatever blend combinations taste
good to you (or your target audience). See also Tom's Blending Basicshttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee">http://www.sweetmarias.com/blending.htmlPacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

21) From: Brian Kamnetz
Jeff,
You don't seem to be getting a great number of posts, though I think
miKe's is very good advice. So, I will throw in my two cents.
I think the reason that you are not getting what you want is this: It
is not possible to give you what you want. Here is what I see as the
problem (and I may be wrong - wouldn't be the first time): it sounds
to me like you want to take specific aim, and lock in the aim, so that
it will hit every time, which is an admirable goal. However, there is
a problem in this case: the target is shifting. Any single origin can
vary lots, depending on many things, not the least of which is the
state to which it is roasted, the profile followed to reach that
state, and how long the roast has rested. When you add two SOs
together the variables are multiplied, etc.
I have not blended much, in part because I sometimes blend, love love
the result, and then am diappointed to find that, due at least in part
to the things I mention above, and to other things, I am unable to
repeat the flavor characteristics that I liked in the blend.
Good luck, and keep plugging. As miKe says, this is a marathon, as I
have learned myself over time.
Brian
On 9/27/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Tom Ulmer
To me a great steak tartare includes plenty of fresh ground black pepper,
onions, Worcestershire sauce and a few capers. Add an egg and the dish is
ruined for me as the steak alone pushes the limit of what I consider rich.
To someone else the egg may deliver the quintessential recipe.
Given the parameters I'd try:
1 & 6 - 1:1 to 1:4
5 & 7 - 1:1
as well as equal parts of 1-7 for a strong press pot.
I have other recipes that you may not find to your liking.

23) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
And my first reply told you exactly what I would have done to attempt to
salvage it. I.E. roast a lighter roast for an SO mélange...
 
BTW, when crafting a blend there is normally NO inferior SO coffee or
inferior roast in the equation. Unless you're talking about the large =
scale
commercial swill blends.
PS BTW, if a roast is totally blown the resulting coffee may no longer =
be
"good coffee" and hence tossing not considered a waste but rather a =
learning
experience. Anyone who is serious about their coffee journey will have a
great many learning experiences be it in sourcing greens, storing =
greens,
roasting greens, storing roasts, brewing roasts...
 
I understand the sentiment of EVER tossing any bean which was once good =
at
any stage of it's life. Yet I have come to accept sometimes it's time to =
say
goodbye to loved ones.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeff =
Anderson
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2007 12:16 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Blending Question
That's exactly why I posted my question. I'm not going to waste good =
coffee
trying to do it on my own. I know I don't have nearly enough experience.
Thanks for your input. I don't have to be told anymore that i don't know
what I'm doing, folks. I already know that.
 
"Learning how to blend wise I agree with Tom that before attempting =
blending
it's important to first know each individual SO including various roasts =
of
each SO. Then knowing how various coffees taste as SO one can =
extrapolate
blending the tastes in their mind before testing actual blends."
miKe mcKoffee wrote: 
First the dark roasted Kenya in question is now at 3 days rest. Have you
tried it now that it's only just now approaching (IMO) properly rested =
for
full flavors developing?
Learning how to blend wise I agree with Tom that before attempting =
blending
it's important to first know each individual SO including various roasts =
of
each SO. Then knowing how various coffees taste as SO one can =
extrapolate
blending the tastes in their mind before testing actual blends. =
Personally I
didn't really even start playing with blending until roasting two or =
three
years. Exploring coffee's infinite complexities is a marathon not a =
sprint!
Blending rules are really simply this: whatever blend combinations taste
good to you (or your target audience). See also Tom's Blending Basicshttp://www.sweetmarias.com/blending.html

24) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'd reduce the equal parts of 1-7 for #7 by half and double #5:-)
Agree forego the egg...
<Snip>

25) From: Jeff Anderson
Thank you very much for some specific suggestions. I don't expect that 
what is a quintessential recipe to you (or anyone else) is going to be 
the same for me. But any recipe based on experience is a better place to 
start than just closing your eyes and digging around in the fridge. I 
have no desire to even begin to learn to blend at this point. My plate 
is running over as it is. In asking my question I didn't expect to even 
begin to comprehend the subtle nuances that only an expert with many 
years of experience can know. If I had any clue whatsoever that asking 
for a suggestion about what to blend this little batch with would be so 
complicated, I would never have done so. I apologize to everyone.
Tom Ulmer wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jeeze get a grip, how the heck is someone else supposed to know what
proportion would taste good to you. Even if they actually had the coffee in
question in front of them people's preferences vary. That's why I suggested
mixing ONLY enough for a single brewing at first then adjust to taste. If
you honestly couldn't figure out to start with 50:50 or whatever ratio you
chose as first go, then chances are you really don't have the
palette/aptitude to blend coffees anyway. Not being snide or cruel, stating
my truthful opinion. Just as some people can cook by only following a
recipe, some people can read a dozen recipes even of something they've never
cooked and create their own. And IMO learning coffee, really learning, is as
much about learning from experience as trying to duplicate someone else's
methods or recipes.
 
If our various replies seemed "too much heat to handle" as the saying goes
stay out of the kitchen or in this case away from the roaster! Ok, don't
stop roasting, that was Curmudgeon mode:-)
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeff Anderson
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2007 1:29 PM
Thanks for the time and effort you put into your replies. I have more than
enough very specific suggestions now, thanks to Tom, so I hope this is the
last post I'll see with this title.
 I read your original suggestion, and in my subsequent post I said thanks,
but I don't know what proportions. Believe it or not, I know that ruined
coffee is ruined coffee. I also expect I'll have to throw away some from
time to time, no matter how much experience I have. If I thought this was
true for this particular little batch, I would not have posted a question to
begin with. And you can be assured that I'll be far more hesitant to do so
in the future.

27) From: Brett Mason
Disregard Mike...  He's just saying what many of us are thinking....  Mike
and I agree entirely...
OK, so here's a thought - put the beans in a baggie, with a notecard
indicating what kind, when roasted, and how you roasted it...
Now go roast a few more, and bag/note each one...
Then take your zass, and blend for a single cup.  Note how you
blend/grind/brew.
Now drink.  and take notes.
If you don't have a zass, then, sorry, bad for you, grind any way you can.
Take notes.
Brew how you like, but brew just for one cup...  Take notes.  This is
important.
If you can't drink it, then it's a really bad blend.  Take notes.  Don't do
that blend again.  Or give it to your mother.  Or the dog.
Maybe somewhere in here I have hit what you like - maybe....
Adjust to taste.
Brett
On 9/27/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

28) From: raymanowen
Not a bother, Jeff! You stated a problem that some roasters may not really
understand. I can certainly appreciate that you call for help rather than
committing good coffee beans to Hades.
It has taken me over thirty (30) years to realize that I didn't know
anything about hobby roasting.  I wasn't really all that impressed with the
first coffee I roasted, though others seemed to like it. The point is,
unless you are a chef or barista, your taste is the only one you have to
satisy.
Once that is done, you're there. After a while, some of my co-workers would
say it was too strong for them. "Aha! I had you in mind when I brewed this!
See the water fountain? See the hot side? Go fix." If I liked weakfish canal
water, there'd be no fix but to offer a stick of my gum.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On 9/27/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

29) From: Larry Johnson
Jeff, I could be wrong, but I still get the impression that you were
offended in some way by the responses. I followed the thread, and what I saw
were honest, sincere answers to the question you asked. No offense was
intended, nor was anything stated offensively that I could see. There was no
other honest answer to your question, really.
As for apologizing and promising to refrain from asking questions, you only
need to refrain until you are able to tell the difference between an honest
answer and a personal affront.
On 9/27/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

30) From: Beth Henkels
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I usually don't do much posting, but felt the need to this time.  I believe
that I saw the post that Jeff took offense to and IMO it was pretty obvious.
However, it could be that I am a little more sensitive to this issue since
the exact same thing happened to me when I first joined this list, and is a
big part of the reason  why I mostly lurk now.  There is a wealth of
knowledge to be had from many of the wonderful people here, but every now
and again there's the occasional "bad bean"
Again, just my opinion,
Beth  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Larry Johnson
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2007 6:00 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Blending Question
Jeff, I could be wrong, but I still get the impression that you were
offended in some way by the responses. I followed the thread, and what I saw
were honest, sincere answers to the question you asked. No offense was
intended, nor was anything stated offensively that I could see. There was no
other honest answer to your question, really. 
As for apologizing and promising to refrain from asking questions, you only
need to refrain until you are able to tell the difference between an honest
answer and a personal affront.
On 9/27/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
 I had no idea that "what can I blend this with?" is an impossible question
to answer. I have never been so thoroughly humbled, and I've learned a great
lesson. Thank you. I can see that my ignorance is a nuisance and very
frustrating to deal with because I know so very little. In the future I'll
do my best to refrain from asking questions until I have enough knowledge
and experience to know when they require so much knowledge and experience
that it's useless to ask. Thanks again, and please accept my very humble
apologies.
Brett Mason wrote: 
Disregard Mike...  He's just saying what many of us are thinking....  Mike
and I agree entirely...
OK, so here's a thought - put the beans in a baggie, with a notecard
indicating what kind, when roasted, and how you roasted it... 
Now go roast a few more, and bag/note each one...
Then take your zass, and blend for a single cup.  Note how you
blend/grind/brew.
Now drink.  and take notes.
If you don't have a zass, then, sorry, bad for you, grind any way you can.
Take notes. 
Brew how you like, but brew just for one cup...  Take notes.  This is
important.
If you can't drink it, then it's a really bad blend.  Take notes.  Don't do
that blend again.  Or give it to your mother.  Or the dog. 
Maybe somewhere in here I have hit what you like - maybe....
Adjust to taste.
Brett
On 9/27/07, miKe mcKoffee <   mcKona>
wrote: 
Jeeze get a grip, how the heck is someone else supposed to know what
proportion would taste good to you. Even if they actually had the coffee in
question in front of them people's preferences vary. That's why I suggested
mixing ONLY enough for a single brewing at first then adjust to taste. If
you honestly couldn't figure out to start with 50:50 or whatever ratio you
chose as first go, then chances are you really don't have the
palette/aptitude to blend coffees anyway. Not being snide or cruel, stating
my truthful opinion. Just as some people can cook by only following a
recipe, some people can read a dozen recipes even of something they've never
cooked and create their own. And IMO learning coffee, really learning, is as
much about learning from experience as trying to duplicate someone else's
methods or recipes.
If our various replies seemed "too much heat to handle" as the saying goes
stay out of the kitchen or in this case away from the roaster! Ok, don't
stop roasting, that was Curmudgeon mode:-)
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeff Anderson
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2007 1:29 PM
Thanks for the time and effort you put into your replies. I have more than
enough very specific suggestions now, thanks to Tom, so I hope this is the
last post I'll see with this title.
 I read your original suggestion, and in my subsequent post I said thanks,
but I don't know what proportions. Believe it or not, I know that ruined
coffee is ruined coffee. I also expect I'll have to throw away some from
time to time, no matter how much experience I have. If I thought this was
true for this particular little batch, I would not have posted a question to
begin with. And you can be assured that I'll be far more hesitant to do so
in the future.
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com--
Larry J 

31) From: Homeroaster
I've been roasting for a long time, but I don't have any blends to my name
that I think are worth talking about.  Occasionally I mix a couple of beans
together and get something wonderful, then it's gone and I can't find a way
to get it back again.
Beans change, roasts change and the only successful commercial blends will
also change in beans and proportions in order to achieve the same taste as
the original blend.
I personally roast and brew two or three pots of different coffees and blend
them 'wet'.  I get immediate feedback as to whether they blend and enhance
each other.  If it works, then I roast and blend the beans and drink it for
a while, thinking about what I might do to make it better.
You absolutely can't blend until you have a mental reference library of how
various coffees taste for that year.  You also can't blend and forget,
assuming it will always work with the same proportions.
In a nutshell...blend if you must but don't take it too seriously unless you
'really' want to take blending seriously.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

32) From:
I'm a new blender too.  Here's what I've been doing:
I'll roast up small batches (about 2/3 cup greens) of about 5 different bea=
ns.
I select them based on something I'm trying to accomplish.  For example, my=
 church wanted a smooth decaf for espresso, with lots of good basic flavor.=
  That told me I needed colombian for the smooth, and some brazil for some =
good flavor.  I knew the gal who requested it liked sumatra, so I threw som=
e of that in.  To leave a good impression of "smooth" and "good flavor", I =
thought a little mexican would be good too.  I ended up  with 40% col, and =
20% each of the other 3.  I roasted each one individually according to the =
tags on the bags the greeens come in.  I kept each bag in a baggy, labled, =
and then put all the baggies in a valve bag. The 1st try is exactly what th=
ey wanted, but if it wasn't, I had enough left over to try different combin=
ations based on feedback.  IE, not smooth enough, more colombian.  If you h=
aven't found it, you can get reveiws on all the coffees on the SM website t=
o figure out what each will add to your blend.  You absolutely have to keep=
 a log of what you roast, and try some everyday.  I blended once and ithe w=
et grounds smelled sweet, the coffee smelled garlicky, and it tasted spicy.=
  At about day 3 though, the garlick/spice went away and began to taste gre=
at.  Another experiement I did was a blend that would "bite" you, then apol=
ogize.  I think it had some sort of kenya , mysore nuggets, and colombian. =
 It did the job.  Another was taking all the greens I had that had a nutty =
or chocolate flavor and blend them.  Sounded good, wasn't that great.  Hope=
 it helps, keep blending, and stay in touch-I'm fascinated by all the possi=
bliities that can be discovered and would love to know your successes and f=
ailures so I can use them.
TIM
---- Jeff Anderson  wrote: 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

33) From: Brett Mason
Hey Jeff,
Nothing personal, and nothing intended to shut anyone up....  Still, you
roasted 5oz of coffee you don't like.  Now you're asking what to do with it,
or what to blend with it to make it better...
I suggested you give it away and move on.  I take it that's not an option
you like...  Yet there's tons of good coffee, and you will find something
you like.  Try Harrar.  I don't care for it, but tons of people on this list
love it.
I suggested you make a science project out of it, by roasting lots of other
coffees and doing some blending...  Ummm - and?  I guess you didn't like
that idea....
My son played soccer tonight - I assume that didn't help.
Maybe Hare Krishna?  OK so that was from the Muppet Movie - memories!
Dude, we have no idea what you like, except you don't like what you
roasted... so we suggested some...  I still think the ideas are sound, and
you would do well to consider them.
Taking your toys and leaving the sandbox is an option, but that would
disappoint everyone.  I am looking forward to what success is for you, and
reading about what you do to solve the challenge...
Perhaps you should try all the suggestions, one at a time.
And Dude, take notes.  It helps in the long run....
Brett
  Brett, who rarely agrees with Mike, yet does for certain on this....
On 9/27/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

34) From:
I'm honored.  Feel free to keep in touch off or on list. Can't wait to hear your results!
Tim
---- Jeff Anderson  wrote:

35) From: Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-1-37346643
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Jeff,
       My blending experiences are probably not worth emulating.  My  
clean up blends where I throw all the little bits of the stash  
together seem to work rather well but when I try to do an intentional  
blend I find I don't really like the results.  And, when someone on  
the list describes a blend that works really well, I never seem to  
have the coffees they call for.  Tom's blends work really well. but  
for the most part, I just enjoy the variety of single origin coffees.
        pecan jim
On Sep 27, 2007, at 8:42 PM, Jeff Anderson wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1-37346643
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Jeff,      My =
blending experiences are probably not worth emulating.  My clean up =
blends where I throw all the little bits of the stash together seem to =
work rather well but when I try to do an intentional blend I find I =
don't really like the results.  And, when someone on the list =
describes a blend that works really well, I never seem to have the =
coffees they call for.  Tom's blends work really well. but for the =
most part, I just enjoy the variety of =
single origin coffees.       pecan =
jim
On Sep 27, 2007, at 8:42 PM, Jeff Anderson =
wrote:
You've gone to a lot of trouble for me, and you have = demonstrated a very admirable level of respect. I can't begin to express = how much I appreciate it. It looks like incredibly good advice. I really = just wanted to know how I could make my little batch of coffee a little = more exciting, but you've inspired me. Maybe I'll try a little blending = after all! I may never be an expert (and I'm not sure I want to be), but = it sure sounds like it could be a lot of fun, even if I'm not an expert = in single origin coffees. The way you describe it, I may have it all = backwards. It sounds like blending experiments, no matter how foolhardy = they may be, might actually help to increase my knowledge of single = origin coffees, not hinder it. This is going into my "Sweet = Maria's-Keep" folder, and I'll definitely keep you posted. Thanks again, = very, very much!   thirddayhomeroaster= r.net wrote: = I'm a new blender too. Here's what I've been doing: I'll roast up small batches (about 2/3 cup greens) of about 5 different = beans. I select them based on something I'm trying to accomplish. For example, = my church wanted a smooth decaf for espresso, with lots of good basic = flavor. That told me I needed colombian for the smooth, and some brazil = for some good flavor. I knew the gal who requested it liked sumatra, so = I threw some of that in. To leave a good impression of "smooth" and = "good flavor", I thought a little mexican would be good too. I ended up = with 40% col, and 20% each of the other 3. I roasted each one = individually according to the tags on the bags the greeens come in. I = kept each bag in a baggy, labled, and then put all the baggies in a = valve bag. The 1st try is exactly what they wanted, but if it wasn't, I = had enough left over to try different combinations based on feedback. = IE, not smooth enough, more colombian. If you haven't found it, you can = get reveiws on all the coffees on the SM website to figure out what each = will add to your blend. You absolutely have to keep a log of what you roast, and try some everyday. I blended once and ithe wet grounds = smelled sweet, the coffee smelled garlicky, and it tasted spicy. At = about day 3 though, the garlick/spice went away and began to taste = great. Another experiement I did was a blend that would "bite" you, = then apologize. I think it had some sort of kenya , mysore nuggets, and = colombian. It did the job. Another was taking all the greens I had = that had a nutty or chocolate flavor and blend them. Sounded good, = wasn't that great. Hope it helps, keep blending, and stay in touch-I'm = fascinated by all the possibliities that can be discovered and would = love to know your successes and failures so I can use them. TIM ---- Jeff Anderson <jeff221> = wrote: I roasted some = Kenya Nyeri Ruiruinu Peaberry a little too long. I didn't destroy the coffee, and it doesn't taste burned. In my limited experience it's what I would call a very light Vienna roast. But it almost completely eliminated the wonderful bright and fruity characteristics of the coffee. Luckily it was only @5 ounces. I assume I = can use it in a blend, but the lone blending experiment I've attempted = was a miserable failure. So I'm hoping I can get some suggestions about = what blends I could try, and in what proportions. The other coffees I have on hand are: 1) Brazil Organic-Fazenda Jacaranda, 2) Colombia Supreme 15943, 3) Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, 4) Costa Rica Tarrazu-La Minita, 5) Ethiopia Harar Horse, lot 14659, 6) Sumatra Organic Gayo Mountain Special, and 7) India Monsooned = "Elephant". I've only been blending @6 weeks, and at first I was crushed. I love the = Kenya. Then I thought of blending potential and felt a little better. Then I realized that six weeks ago I would have thought this was wonderful coffee just as it is, which indicates how much I've learned already, and felt great. It's a good lesson, not a disaster after all, = and that's great, too. Thanks in advance for any suggestions, and for being here. I've learned = a lot from all of you in just a few short weeks, and I look forward to = learning a lot more. homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, = unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, = unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<= BR>= --Apple-Mail-1-37346643--

36) From: Jeff Anderson
The one and only time I tried to blend, if you can call it that, 
consisted of doing exactly the same thing. I threw in a few odds and 
ends which by themselves were too small to roast. It was awful, and 
that's why I asked my question. I didn't want to put myself through that =
again! This is a great reminder that as with so much in life, it's a 
journey and not a destination. And even more importantly, don't take 
myself (or coffee) so seriously, and don't be so hard on myself. If this =
isn't fun, it's not worth it, and if I'm not making some mistakes, it's 
because I'm not doing anything. For some reason, I can't seem to get 
those lessons under my belt. I keep having to be reminded, again and 
again! I too enjoy the single origin coffees, and I'm amazed. I thought 
coffee was just coffee. Boy, was I ever wrong! If I never tasted another =
blend, I'd have more than enough to keep me happy. Thanks for the 
feedback. I've enjoyed all your posts, and learned from them, too.
Jim Gundlach wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
nt beans.
<Snip>
le, my church wanted a smooth decaf for espresso, with lots of good basic=
 flavor.  That told me I needed colombian for the smooth, and some brazil=
 for some good flavor.  I knew the gal who requested it liked sumatra, so=
 I threw some of that in.  To leave a good impression of "smooth" and "go=
od flavor", I thought a little mexican would be good too.  I ended up  wi=
th 40% col, and 20% each of the other 3.  I roasted each one individually=
 according to the tags on the bags the greeens come in.  I kept each bag =
in a baggy, labled, and then put all the baggies in a valve bag. The 1st =
try is exactly what they wanted, but if it wasn't, I had enough left over=
 to try different combinations based on feedback.  IE, not smooth enough,=
 more colombian.  If you haven't found it, you can get reveiws on all the=
 coffees on the SM website to figure out what each will add to your blend=
.  You absolutely have to keep a log of what
<Snip>
ds smelled sweet, the coffee smelled garlicky, and it tasted spicy.  At a=
bout day 3 though, the garlick/spice went away and began to taste great. =
 Another experiement I did was a blend that would "bite" you, then apolog=
ize.  I think it had some sort of kenya , mysore nuggets, and colombian. =
 It did the job.  Another was taking all the greens I had that had a nutt=
y or chocolate flavor and blend them.  Sounded good, wasn't that great.  =
Hope it helps, keep blending, and stay in touch-I'm fascinated by all the=
 possibliities that can be discovered and would love to know your success=
es and failures so I can use them.
<Snip>
dn't 
<Snip>
<Snip>
me I 
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<Snip>
out 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
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ant".
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<Snip>
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<Snip>
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<Snip>
to 
<Snip>
svbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettin=gs
<Snip>
vbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsetting=s
<Snip>

37) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I call Troll BS...  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeff Anderson
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2007 6:14 PM
 
 
  I simply thought someone might have a suggestion about what I could do to
"perk up this little batch, just a little bit" so to speak, 
 
 
 
 I've learned that apparently there is no answer to "how might I perk this
up a little." 
 
And the heart of the BS. Multiple answers given by multiple posters.
 
 

38) From: Eddie Dove
Jeff,
I am not an expert at blending, I am sure that my post is too late to
be of any help for this batch and much of which is below will be my
opinion.
I don't really know what tastes you are getting from this batch, so it
is a little difficult to suggest complimentary flavors.  My assumption
would be that you are getting some darker, roast accented, bittersweet
chocolates and wish to "punch it up" a bit.  A melange blend of the
same bean can do just that.  I would also think that some lighter
roasts of either of your Brazil or Mexico would soften the flavors
just a bit and add some accent highlights if blended about 50 / 50
with the Kenya.  The Costa Rica could probably do the same, but I have
never roasted the La Minita well enough to do it justice.
The Monsooned Malabar Elephant or the Sumatra Gayo is not likely to be
helpful in this instance.  The Horse 14569 was so good to me as a
single origin that I don't think I could suggest blending it.  The
Columbia 15943 just made its way to my home and I have not yet roasted
it, so ...
For future reference, along with the information at Sweet Maria's, you
may wish to read the article from the July / August 2006 issue of
Roast Magazine, "Blending the Rules," which is posted online at:http://www.roastmagazine.com/backissues/julyaug2006/blendingtherules.htmlI hope this is helpful.
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 9/26/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>

39) From: Peter Z
Jeff,
Please do not take all your toys and go home. There are a lot of 
sophisticated coffee drinkers on this list, and alas, even though I have =
been roasting for a few years, I can not count myself among them.
I have noticed that folks sometimes mention the UPS blend, or the end of =
bag blend.
These sometimes turn out very well, ....or not.
To me there is no way to tell until you try it. If you have a roast you 
are not happy with it may help to try mixing it with another bean, 
trying to follow Tom's advice on blending, or sometimes the same bean 
roasted to a different level and combined, makes a great blend.
Seems that you are correct in noticing that there is no sure way to tell =
for sure about blending, given all the variables, unless you want to 
make a career at it.
Me, I always can not taste any of the fruits or spices or whatever that 
folks here mention, but I can tell if I like the coffee or not, or if it =
tastes different than another coffee or roast.
That's about all I can do, but usually I think the coffee I roast is 
pretty good, regardless of my descriptive or tasting abilities.
Also, I used to like the canned coffee, and think it was pretty good. 
Even got into discussions about which brand of canned pre-ground coffee 
was better!
Now I can't stand that stuff, but I still wonder how you can open a can 
of pre ground, two bucks for five pound vacuum sealed coffee, and it 
still tastes the same after sitting in the closet for several months.
Do they spray it with preservative?
PeterZ
Jeff Anderson wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
t beans.
<Snip>
e, my church wanted a smooth decaf for espresso, with lots of good basic =
flavor.  That told me I needed colombian for the smooth, and some brazil =
for some good flavor.  I knew the gal who requested it liked sumatra, so =
I threw some of that in.  To leave a good impression of "smooth" and "goo=
d flavor", I thought a little mexican would be good too.  I ended up  wit=
h 40% col, and 20% each of the other 3.  I roasted each one individually =
according to the tags on the bags the greeens come in.  I kept each bag i=
n a baggy, labled, and then put all the baggies in a valve bag. The 1st t=
ry is exactly what they wanted, but if it wasn't, I had enough left over =
to try different combinations based on feedback.  IE, not smooth enough, =
more colombian.  If you haven't found it, you can get reveiws on all the =
coffees on the SM website to figure out what each will add to your blend.=
  You absolutely have to keep a log of what
<Snip>
s smelled sweet, the coffee smelled garlicky, and it tasted spicy.  At ab=
out day 3 though, the garlick/spice went away and began to taste great.  =
Another experiement I did was a blend that would "bite" you, then apologi=
ze.  I think it had some sort of kenya , mysore nuggets, and colombian.  =
It did the job.  Another was taking all the greens I had that had a nutty=
 or chocolate flavor and blend them.  Sounded good, wasn't that great.  H=
ope it helps, keep blending, and stay in touch-I'm fascinated by all the =
possibliities that can be discovered and would love to know your successe=
s and failures so I can use them.
<Snip>
n't 
<Snip>
e I 
<Snip>
d 
<Snip>
ut 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
nt".
<Snip>
the 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
, 
<Snip>
ed 
<Snip>
o 
<Snip>
vbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsetting=s
<Snip>
bscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings=<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
-
<Snip>
2007 11:06 AM
<Snip>

40) From: Jeff Anderson
Very helpful. It's going into my "save" folder. Thank you very much!
Peter Z wrote:
<Snip>

41) From: Homeroaster
I don't know how long you've been in forums and groups, but I have never 
seen a group that required a social skills test to become a member.  If you 
let one or a few ruffle your feathers and silence you, then you will be 
silenced more than you will speak and participate.  That pretty much goes 
for any group you may join.
I think the very nature of text groups lends itself to being a bit more 
direct at times.  I'm not sure why, but I see it all the time.  It's very 
noticeable when I've met a person who comes across as a real jerk in a group 
but is actually a pretty decent person face to face.  It's not going to 
change.
Become lurkers if you so choose, but then everyone loses.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

42) From: Jeff Anderson
I'm sure that everyone here has very positive qualities that I would 
like and appreciate very much under different circumstances. If you read 
back through my posts in this topic, I think you'll see that I agree 
very much with your suggestion to be direct. I think you'll also find 
that I'm a very poor politician, and have a real problem when it comes 
to diplomacy. I don't claim to be flawless. I'm obviously not a member 
of the CSA club, so maybe the problem with directness is the fact that 
it's been a two-way street, and you don't like to see your buddies 
confronted directly the way I have. I'm sorry if it offends you. All I 
can ask is that you give me as much leeway in the "lacking social 
skills" and ":directness" departments that you've asked me to give your 
friends, in spite of the fact that I'm not a member of the club. Reasonable?
Oh, and thanks for the "what to expect from forums" lesson. It's amazing 
how little I seem to know since i started posting and not just reading! 
Now there you go. I'm a terrible politician! I can be way too sarcastic 
for my own good sometimes.
Homeroaster wrote:
<Snip>

43) From: Homeroaster
You sure assume a lot.

44) From: Jeff Anderson
Thanks for the observation and the feedback. By the way, I did not make 
the comments about "social skills", so maybe I'm not the only one who 
assumes a lot. That was another poster who was sharing a similar 
experience she had, and why she doesn't post much because of it. I can 
certainly empathize. It's been impossible to dodge the slams and digs 
they've been coming in so fast. Thankfully it's been the few and not the 
many.
Homeroaster wrote:
<Snip>

45) From: John Brown
it may be do to the skill one has in witting an intelligible response 
the the previous post.  maybe just poor English grammar and spelling. 
which i suffer from.  now if there were only a grammar check like spell 
check!
i flunked English almost all the way through school.  the only reason i 
got a diploma, was i scored very good on the rest of the tests on the 
GED.  and eighteen years writing evaluations on subordinates.
Homeroaster wrote:
<Snip>

46) From: Floyd Lozano
My simple advice is to learn what you can from wherever you can learn it, if
you want to learn it bad enough.  Don't let things like personality
conflicts get in the way.  You don't really have to like someone to learn
from them.   Sometimes you have to dig around in the mud to find a truffle.
With no sucking up intended, i think many many on this list could learn from
Tom's example.  He knows more about coffee, hands down, than anyone, ANYONE,
on this list.  Observe how he treats people and answers questions, and
imparts knowledge, and strive for that as an ideal.  Many on the list do.
Several do NOT.
-F
On 9/28/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>

47) From: Jeff Anderson
Poor English grammar and spelling? You seem communicate as well as 
anyone, and that's all that matters.
John Brown wrote:
<Snip>

48) From: Justin Marquez
Whew!  Ain't that the gospel truth!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 9/28/07, Homeroaster  wrote:
<Snip>

49) From: Les
Jeff,
I just read the whole thread.  First off I would encourage you to not
put yourself down.  Hey you are smart enough to be a homeroaster!
Second, I would take some of the harshness that you see as passion!  I
have spent time with Mike McKoffee.  He is one of the few people in
this world that you can have an honest open debate with, not agree and
still end the conversation with a hug and mutual respect, ending in a
deeper friendship and respect.  So with that out of the way, I will
give you my blending philosophy after 25 years of home roasting.
1.  It is very difficult to rescue a botched roast by blending.  It
seems as if the faults always shine through.  The best place to blend
these is with the trash because you waste a lot of good beans trying
to rescue the ones you don't like.  I speak from experience!
2.  Blending should be done for a reason, and should be targeted to a
brew method.  So here are some things to thing about when blending.
There are three things a blend should try to do.  Not necessarily all
three, but at least one.  1. Enhance the body of the brew.  This is
why I often use a Brazil DP as an espresso base. 2.  Tone down the
brightness of a coffee.  This is why I will often blend a Sumatra with
a Kenya.  3. Multiply the flavors in the cup.  The famous Moka-Java
blend.  In my opinion, if you are not trying to do one of those three
things you are just mixing Single Origin beans.    So, let me take you
through my thinking of my QUAD blend.  This is a blend I developed for
espresso, but it also makes a good drip.  I will be blending equal
parts of the
El Salvador Orange Bourbon,
India Mallali Estate - "Tree-Dried Natural"
Sumatra Blue Batak "Tarbarita" Peaberry
Brazil Organic Fazenda Jacaranda
The purpose of the El Salvador is to provide the flavor.  I am after
the orange sweetness and the chocolate.  The  purpose of the India is
to provide body and complexity.  The purpose of the Sumatra is to
provide incredible body and silkiness,  The purpose of the Brazil to
is provide more citrus and smoothness.
So the end result of this blend is you get an espresso shot that is
thick and malty with a smoothness that has absolutely no bite when you
enjoy it.  The flavor beings as an incredible orange and goes to an
orange chocolate with peanut butter hints ending with a smooth
chocolate finish that lingers.  The interplay of the beans fills your
whole mouth with awesome coffee flavor.
I hope this helps.
Les
On 9/28/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>

50) From: Lisa Carton
wow...if that didn't "help" it sure DID make me drool!!!!!!
thanks again =
les........i am inspired to blend with that post!!!!!
 
 
 
 
 =
 
Visit my Blog here:http://lisabeeen.blogspot.com   
---=
-- Original Message ----
From: Les 
To: homeroas=
t
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2007 9:57:32 AM
Sub=
ject: Re: +Blending Question
Jeff,
I just read the whole thread. =
 First off I would encourage you to not
put yourself down.  Hey you are s=
mart enough to be a homeroaster!
Second, I would take some of the harshne=
ss that you see as passion!  I
have spent time with Mike McKoffee.  He is=
 one of the few people in
this world that you can have an honest open deb=
ate with, not agree and
still end the conversation with a hug and mutual =
respect, ending in a
deeper friendship and respect.  So with that out of =
the way, I will
give you my blending philosophy after 25 years of home ro=
asting.
1.  It is very difficult to rescue a botched roast by blending=
.  It
seems as if the faults always shine through.  The best place to ble=
nd
these is with the trash because you waste a lot of good beans trying=
to rescue the ones you don't like.  I speak from experience!
2.  Bl=
ending should be done for a reason, and should be targeted to a
brew meth=
od.  So here are some things to thing about when blending.
There are thre=
e things a blend should try to do.  Not necessarily all
three, but at lea=
st one.  1. Enhance the body of the brew.  This is
why I often use a Braz=
il DP as an espresso base. 2.  Tone down the
brightness of a coffee.  Thi=
s is why I will often blend a Sumatra with
a Kenya.  3. Multiply the flav=
ors in the cup.  The famous Moka-Java
blend.  In my opinion, if you are n=
ot trying to do one of those three
things you are just mixing Single Orig=
in beans.    So, let me take you
through my thinking of my QUAD blend.  T=
his is a blend I developed for
espresso, but it also makes a good drip.  =
I will be blending equal
parts of the
El Salvador Orange Bourbon,
Ind=
ia Mallali Estate - "Tree-Dried Natural"
Sumatra Blue Batak "Tarbarita" P=
eaberry
Brazil Organic Fazenda Jacaranda
The purpose of the El Salva=
dor is to provide the flavor.  I am after
the orange sweetness and the ch=
ocolate.  The  purpose of the India is
to provide body and complexity.  T=
he purpose of the Sumatra is to
provide incredible body and silkiness,  T=
he purpose of the Brazil to
is provide more citrus and smoothness.
S=
o the end result of this blend is you get an espresso shot that is
thick =
and malty with a smoothness that has absolutely no bite when you
enjoy it=
.  The flavor beings as an incredible orange and goes to an
orange chocol=
ate with peanut butter hints ending with a smooth
chocolate finish that l=
ingers.  The interplay of the beans fills your
whole mouth with awesome c=
offee flavor.
I hope this helps.
Les
On 9/28/07,=
 Justin Marquez  wrote:
> Whew!  Ain't that the gosp=
el truth!
>
> Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
> Justin Marquez (CYPRESS=
, TX)
>
>
>
> On 9/28/07, Homeroaster  wrote:=
> >
> > In a nutshell...blend if you must but don't take it too seriou=
sly unless
> you
> > 'really' want to take blending seriously.
>
>=
>
homeroast mailing =
listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change =
your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to=
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings       ==
Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels =
with Yahoo! FareChase.http://farechase.yahoo.com/

51) From: John Brown
Jeff i have had forty three years to improve.  and thousands of books 
read.   i gave up on written grammar and write like i speak.  i am old 
enough
now back to coffee, my taste buds have been jazzed up and tossed around 
a bit from cancer treatment,  i don't find the flavors the rest of you 
guys talk about.  but i roasted the colomumbian last night and ground it 
this morning.  used the press pot a very nice cup not bitter at all.  
and to me that is most important!
Jeff Anderson wrote:
<Snip>

52) From: raymanowen
Egad!
These Glorious keyboards are supposed to be dust proof and moisture
proof, but my finger tips get all wet when I'm drooling.
Something to look forward to-
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On 9/28/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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