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Topic: ...back to coffee (2 msgs / 88 lines)
1) From: Terry Stockdale
At 06:23 PM 8/21/2003 -0700, Zara Haimo wrote:
<Snip>
The Aged Sumatra makes a nice drip coffee.  I haven't tried it as straight 
espresso, though.
My favorite coffee at the moment is the Uganda Mbale Bugisu, roasted in my 
Hottop.  I take it to Full City and eject at about 458 degrees F. This 
roast makes a fantastic single-origin espresso or Americano as well as 
being an excellent choice for drip coffee.  Today's roasting session was 2 
250g batches of Bugisu (one for a gift), 2 250g batches of Panama Mama 
Cata, one 250g batch of Brazil Mogiani, one 250g batch of Brazil Santos SWP 
'01 (which I don't think I'm going to like, since the older process took so 
much taste out of the beans), and one 250g batch of SM's Monkey Blend.
Roasting temperature measurement is via a thermocouple-equipped thermometer 
($19.95 from Web-tronics.com http://store.yahoo.com/webtronics/digtherwkpro.html).  Web-tronics also 
carry Variac's, which are variable transformers that make it easy to run 
your roaster at the voltage you want.  If you do buy stuff from them, be 
sure to search around on their website for the info about the free digital 
multimeter for orders over $50.  The multimeter enables you to keep the 
voltage constant despite changes in the power supply, e.g., when the air 
conditioner kicks on.  I maintain the voltage at 120v when the Hottop is 
heating, which bumps to about 125v when the heater cycles off.
My roasting sessions have the multimeter plugged into a 3-way adapter along 
with my Hottop, and the digital thermometer's thermocouple snaked into the 
Hottop via the bean chute and down into the bean mass.  It's fun to watch 
the temps change.  Even more interestingly, I see some beans hit 1st crack 
at 400 degrees, while others don't until about 440 degrees.  But, they all 
hit second crack right around 450 degrees.  Full city is 458-460 degrees.
--
Terry Stockdale -- terrys -- Baton Rouge, LA
website: http://www.dadstoy.net

2) From: Terry Stockdale
At 06:23 PM 8/21/2003 -0700, Zara Haimo wrote:
<Snip>
The Aged Sumatra makes a nice drip coffee.  I haven't tried it as straight 
espresso, though.
My favorite coffee at the moment is the Uganda Mbale Bugisu, roasted in my 
Hottop.  I take it to Full City and eject at about 458 degrees F. This 
roast makes a fantastic single-origin espresso or Americano as well as 
being an excellent choice for drip coffee.  Today's roasting session was 2 
250g batches of Bugisu (one for a gift), 2 250g batches of Panama Mama 
Cata, one 250g batch of Brazil Mogiani, one 250g batch of Brazil Santos SWP 
'01 (which I don't think I'm going to like, since the older process took so 
much taste out of the beans), and one 250g batch of SM's Monkey Blend.
Roasting temperature measurement is via a thermocouple-equipped thermometer 
($19.95 from Web-tronics.com http://store.yahoo.com/webtronics/digtherwkpro.html).  Web-tronics also 
carry Variac's, which are variable transformers that make it easy to run 
your roaster at the voltage you want.  If you do buy stuff from them, be 
sure to search around on their website for the info about the free digital 
multimeter for orders over $50.  The multimeter enables you to keep the 
voltage constant despite changes in the power supply, e.g., when the air 
conditioner kicks on.  I maintain the voltage at 120v when the Hottop is 
heating, which bumps to about 125v when the heater cycles off.
My roasting sessions have the multimeter plugged into a 3-way adapter along 
with my Hottop, and the digital thermometer's thermocouple snaked into the 
Hottop via the bean chute and down into the bean mass.  It's fun to watch 
the temps change.  Even more interestingly, I see some beans hit 1st crack 
at 400 degrees, while others don't until about 440 degrees.  But, they all 
hit second crack right around 450 degrees.  Full city is 458-460 degrees.
                     Terry Stockdale --  Baton Rouge, LA
6.5 billion kilograms of coffee are grown each year -- but, I'm picky!
                     Website: http://espresso.dadstoy.net


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