HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Grinder Question (78 msgs / 2239 lines)
1) From: jbrooks
Greetings one and all,
    I recently moved to Southside VA, where there is no gourmet or fresh
coffee sources.  So, stepping up, I now have a small local side
business, adding customers regularly.
    My current grinder of choice for myself is my Zass 169D.  Great, love
it.  I did grind 2# of coffee in it last week, all at once.  Don't
want to do that again.  My question to pose to the group is this: 
what would grinder would you buy for occasional batch grinding of
1#-2# of coffee?  I've looked at the Mazzers at SM's.  They appear as
if they would work, but I wonder if that would put too much wear on
the burrs.  Is there any other models you would recommend?  I know
many of you are fond of the Rocky.  How about its burrs?  Would a
small commercial be better?  What kind of price?
Thanks,
Jason
PS- Currently, I would probably be grinding ~4#/month.  In 6 mos, who
knows!!!

2) From: Greg Scace
The mazzer mini is a commercial grinder.  These things get used daily in 
coffeeshops.   Why don't you ask Tom about them, or ask some of the folks 
who repair them.  I think that espresso parts NW should be able to give you 
the skinny.  (As far as I know Espresso Parts NW is not a competitor of 
Sweet Maria's, so I feel I am on safe ground mentioning them as an 
information source on Mazzer grinders).
-Greg
At 01:13 PM 10/2/2003 -0400, you wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Jim Schulman
Hi Jason,
Commercial espresso grinders like the Mazzer or Rocky aren't 
really designed for batch grinding, rather for frequently 
grinding small portions. They are geared to grind rather slowly, 
so that a pound would take about 7 to 8 minutes, and they don't 
advise running the motors more than one minute at a time.
Your best bet would be to check ebay for Grindmaster or Bunn 
supermarket bulk grinders, and perhaps replace the burrs if 
necessary.
Jim
On 2 Oct 2003 at 13:13, jbrooks wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Rich Adams
The mazzer minis are small commercial.  At least that's how the power cord
placement was explained to me.
BTW, BTDT with the 169, not fun.
Rich Adams

5) From: Lissa
On Thu, 2003-10-02 at 13:13, jbrooks wrote:
<Snip>
I remember someone here talking about modifying their Zass to accept a
power drill.  Just pull the trigger, and grind.  Shouldn't be difficult.
Be well,
Lissa
-- 
To be a good civil libertarian is to spend one's life in a fairly 
constant state of alarm, which leaves the group somewhat frazzled.
Molly Ivins, "Fish or Cut Bait"

6) From: AlChemist John
I will start off saying my comment is hearsay.
I recall reading the Zass are designed for manual and the heat generated by 
the speed at which a drill could rotate may harm the burrs.  Anyone else 
heard this.  I have often though of motorizing mine, but really do not mind 
(actually enjoy) the 2 minute routine of coffee grinding every day.
Sometime around 10:49 10/2/2003, Lissa typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/

7) From: Rich Adams
I try to do that, using a variable drill, keeping in mind about the speed
and the heat, but I could not reach enough torque to overcome the initial
momentum without ultimately grinding too fast.
Rich Adams
radams

8) From: miKe mcKoffee

9) From: Rich Adams
Nah, sounds like you need a zass to test.  :-)  I forgot the model 115vac
Milwaukee it is but it has torque adjustment and speed control.   I tried, I
got it too work, but thought it was too fast.  Maybe not fast at all as I
didn't measure temperatures.  Slow speed high torque, med speed med torque,
you name it, the combination is endless with variable torque/variable speed.
Like I said, maybe at the speed torque combo I did get it work at was not
fast at all for others, I just felt it was too fast for my liking.
The mazzer makes it all seem like ancient history now...
Respectfully,
Rich Adams

10) From: John Abbott
One of the famous faults of the  SM5K is that one is confined to pulling 
shots with the bean that is currently loaded in the hopper.  Question 
for you purest: How do you manage to change beans when you are grinding 
for your espresso machine.  I noticed that the hoppers appear to be 
fixed on most of the machines used at the gatherings.  So explain how 
that differs from the hopper on the SM5k please.
-- 
~John~ Loving life in the slow lane

11) From: Peter R. Barnes
I can't answer for anyone else, but I weigh the coffee for each shot that I=
 pull.  I never leave coffee in my hopper.  After all the beans are groun=
d I brush out the inside of Rocky, and grind the remnants into the shot a=
s well.  When switching types of beans, I throw three or four of the new =
beans into the grinder, and brush out as much of the detritus as I can ge=
t before grinding the new beans.  I also throw a few beans into the grind=
er when changing my grind setting.
I have no idea if this is obsessive or not.
cheers
peter

12) From: miKe mcKoffee
Simple, you only put in the amount you are going to pull for each shot or
series of shots. Fill the hopper and leave the beans exposed to staling
oxygen? Pleeeeeaaaassse!:-) For instance, put in a measure of Aussie for
Debi's Americano and grind. While loading the PF and pulling her shot my
Kona is grinding... result back to back pulls of different coffees. Or if
I'm making say six Americanos or shots in a row of the same bean (like at
PNWGII) put enough beans in the hopper for those 6 double shots. Start
grinding and when enough ground for 1st shot and while still grinding begin
shot series sequence minimizing time both whole bean and grounds exposed to
air... True, I am a "bit" fanatical about keeping oxygen off my coffees!
Even had a FoodSaver at PNWGII to re-vac jars after taking out beans.
I do believe on Mazzer's the hopper can be closed off at the feed and taken
off BTW... a feature Rocky does not have and I don't miss anyway since I
never "fill" the hopper.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

13) From: miKe mcKoffee

14) From: John Abbott
On Friday 09 July 2004 12:18, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
So really the only penalty (substantial as it is) is the throw away shot 
when I begin the process with the SM5K.  My reason for asking really 
wasn't to defend the SM5K but I'm starting an active program for a 
powered grinder.  I love the results from the Zass DG169 - but it takes 
half the morning to get to that first shot with the La Pavoni.  That 
and the fact that I have to wipe out half the counter setting up and 
measuring the beans for the grind.
I'm not as fanatical as you over the bean exposure - I guess living in a 
less humid atmosphere helps.  But I realize that I'm dumping a lot of 
coffee with that throw away shot on the SM5K and so only use the LP for 
the better (read that costly) beans.
My current thinking is a Super Jolly - but I'm about a week from making 
a decision. So expect more of this drivel.
~John~ Loving life in the slow lane

15) From: Lesley Albjerg
The nice thing about a Mazzer is the hopper just lifts off.  On the Super Jolly, one shot is when you fill the hopper to the bottom of the close off gate.  I put bean in to the bottom of the gate for one shot, grind, dose, lift off the hopper and vacuum everything out after the shot so everything is ready for the next type of bean or shot.  For multiple shots, I put more beans in the hopper and close the gate, grind, dose, pull shot, open gate, beans refill, close gate, grind....................until I am done.
 
Les
miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
Simple, you only put in the amount you are going to pull for each shot or
series of shots. Fill the hopper and leave the beans exposed to staling
oxygen? Pleeeeeaaaassse!:-) For instance, put in a measure of Aussie for
Debi's Americano and grind. While loading the PF and pulling her shot my
Kona is grinding... result back to back pulls of different coffees. Or if
I'm making say six Americanos or shots in a row of the same bean (like at
PNWGII) put enough beans in the hopper for those 6 double shots. Start
grinding and when enough ground for 1st shot and while still grinding begin
shot series sequence minimizing time both whole bean and grounds exposed to
air... True, I am a "bit" fanatical about keeping oxygen off my coffees!
Even had a FoodSaver at PNWGII to re-vac jars after taking out beans.
I do believe on Mazzer's the hopper can be closed off at the feed and taken
off BTW... a feature Rocky does not have and I don't miss anyway since I
never "fill" the hopper.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

16) From: gin
Yes, Peter it is...
gin
At 10:02 AM 7/9/2004, you wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Lesley Albjerg
John,
I own a Super Jolly.  Pecan Jim has a Major.  If I were buying a new machine, I would go with a Minni.  My Super Jolly is over-kill!  However at less than $100.00, I can live with over-kill.  The Mazzers are all built like a tank!  If counter space is a premium, the Minni has plenty of power to meet your needs IMHO.
 
Les
John Abbott  wrote:
On Friday 09 July 2004 12:18, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
So really the only penalty (substantial as it is) is the throw away shot 
when I begin the process with the SM5K. My reason for asking really 
wasn't to defend the SM5K but I'm starting an active program for a 
powered grinder. I love the results from the Zass DG169 - but it takes 
half the morning to get to that first shot with the La Pavoni. That 
and the fact that I have to wipe out half the counter setting up and 
measuring the beans for the grind.
I'm not as fanatical as you over the bean exposure - I guess living in a 
less humid atmosphere helps. But I realize that I'm dumping a lot of 
coffee with that throw away shot on the SM5K and so only use the LP for 
the better (read that costly) beans.
My current thinking is a Super Jolly - but I'm about a week from making 
a decision. So expect more of this drivel.
~John~ Loving life in the slow lane

18) From: Angelo
What Peter said......

19) From: Lowe, David
And your point would be?  :-)
Dave Lowe

20) From: John Kangas
Same as Les, but I only use the sliding-door bit the hopper screws into, the 
hopper itself has been stashed away somewhere for so long I don't even know 
where it is! I'm using an SL-70, so it's too long between shots anyways to 
grind them all at once, no 3-way valve. :-(
John Kangas
<Snip>
MSN Toolbar provides one-click access to Hotmail from any Web page  FREE 
download!http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200413ave/direct/01/

21) From: John Abbott
On Fri, 2004-07-09 at 22:40, John Kangas wrote:
<Snip>
So If I follow you, you don't use the hopper but simply pout the beans
in the top?
What we need is a nitrogen backfilled system so the beans could just sit
in the hopper for days :O)
-- 
~John~ Loving life in the slow lane

22) From: DJ Garcia
I'm like Mike, for two reasons: I normally only do two double/triple
shots a day - wasted beans per session become more of an issue, and
staleness more of a problem. In my L.C. Junior, I removed the hopper and
pour beans for the shot at hand. I need to insure that
  a) the beans in the grinding chamber are all ground,
  b) all the grounds in the exit chamber to the hopper do indeed
transfer to the hopper, and 
  c) pretty much all ground coffee goes from the doser to the
portafilter. 
The down side is I spend about two minutes extra clearing the grinder
per session. The plus is that I never have stale grounds, other than
some insignificant loose dust, and a pretty darned clean grinder
day-in-day-out. It may help some with the burrs, too - don't really
know. If I do multiple shots per session, it's more of an issue, but
seems to work for me.
DJ

23) From: HckneyElec
are you guys familiar with a gaggia mdf coffee grinder?
if so please give me a little insite into its functionability and  value
thanks
larry

24) From: Marc Joseph
HckneyElec wrote:
<Snip>
I have one that I use for espresso and am very happy with the grind. It 
can be tricky going back and forth between grinding for espresso and 
french press as it retains some of the previous grind so I use my old 
Solis Maestro for french press and the MDF for espresso exclusively. 
What I didn't like at first is the doser but I've since learned to adapt 
to it. Others have stated that the grind is as good as the Rocky but 
since I've never used a Rocky I can't comment on that.
I got mine on sale for $150 at the time so that made an attractive buy,  
you should see what the current price difference is between the MDF and 
anything else you are considering in determining if it is good value for 
you.
Marc

25) From: Edward Spiegel
At 1:33 PM -0500 1/25/05, HckneyElec wrote:
<Snip>
Hi Larry,
I have had one for about 15 years and think that it is a terrific grinder. As a grinder it is very similar in operation and performance to a Rancilio Rocky from what I understand from people that have used both--at least where grind quality and burrs is concerned. I don't know how the grind speed compares.
The grind dial is consistent (i.e. 2 is always the same grind no matter where the grinder wheel is dialed from but like the Rocky not all MDFs are calibrated the same so that your 2 and mine might be different -- especially since I re-calibrated mine at some point to make a better Turkish)
I personally don't like the doser and wish that it could be removed -- it is a bit of a pain when you are using it  to grind for anything but espresso -- but it can sometimes be found substantially cheaper than the Rocky. So, if you don't mind dealer with the doser you can get a great grind of coffee.
At least that's my experience.
I think that you can find some reviews at coffeegeek.com
Anyway, even though I don't love the doser, I am quite happy with the grind that it produces. And use it for pump espresso, moka pot, press pot, vac pot and drip.
Best,
Edward

26) From: HckneyElec
edward
thanks for the response on the gaggio grinder
i intend only to use it for espresso if i buy it
from what you say that may work out ok with the doser?
where do you personally set the grind for espresso?
thanks
larry

27) From: Edward Spiegel
At 10:48 PM -0500 1/25/05, HckneyElec wrote:
<Snip>
I set the grind on 2 or 3 (it varies with the roast and the age of the roast) BUT the machines (just like Rockys) do not come calibrated the same and mine was purchased a long time ago. So, my 2 might be your 5. It took a few tries to find the right number.
Best,
Edward

28) From: Rick Copple
I also have a grinder question.
On my Zass grinder, I've noticed when I set the grinder that when I'm 
done grinding, the grind setting has usually shifted about 1/8th turn or 
so coarser. In effect, that would mean as I grind, my coffee will be 
getting coaser as I go.
Has anyone else experienced this...is this a grinder defect? The 
adjusting knob might be a little loose, at least it seems to move pretty 
freely. If so, is there an easy way to fix it short of sending it back 
for a replacement?
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX
PS: Hope this one gets through, two others of mine never saw the light 
of day. Have no idea why.

29) From: AlChemist John
I have heard it is an acceptable one.
I keep looking at "up grading" my Zass.  Then I realize that I am just not 
unhappy with it, and stop looking.
Does anyone else here use a Zass as their only grinder?
Sometime around 10:33 1/25/2005, HckneyElec typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

30) From: AlChemist John
Zass's "drift".  To me, that is their only flaw.  A drop of blue loctite on 
the threads gives enough resistance to stop the drift.  You can also just 
put your thumb up there.
Sometime around 20:43 1/25/2005, Rick Copple typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

31) From: Brett Mason
I use the melitta burr grinder, and almost threw it through the window
yesterday.  Seems the crud built up, and stopped feeding grounds to
the little plastic canister.
My Zass 499 has done 95% of my grinding over the last 6 months, and
never gets crudded up.  It drifts, so every few days I dial it closed,
then back it off 1.5 turns for drip...
I gave up on my Cuisinart Grind-N-Brew cause I hated the mess.  I took
a $20 risk on the Melitta, and proved the zass is worth every penny. 
And it is far less messy than anything else I have seen...
Brett
On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 06:24:01 -0800, AlChemist John  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

32) From: Justin Marquez
Well, you DO have to occasionally clean them! (As you probably have to
do for that incomparable Zass)
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.comOn Wed, 26 Jan 2005 07:28:15 -0800, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

33) From: Brett Mason
Well, I have cleaned my Zass twice in six months.  I cleaned when I
first received it, and again earlier this week.  But I wasn't having
any clumping issue, nor did I notice any dust anywhere.  I just
decided that if others were recommending cleaning the burr grinders, I
probably should.
My experience is that the zass drops a few grinds on the couter each
time I take the drawer out.  Then again, so does every other grinder I
have tried, with the Cuisinart being the king-of-mess...
All-in-all, the Zass is probably my cleanest and easiest to use grinder...
Brett
On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 11:42:38 -0600, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

34) From: John Blumel
On Jan 26, 2005, at 1:58pm, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
I also find, with the knee model at least, that after you empty the 
bin, you should reinsert it and knock the side of the grinder and a 
significant amount more will drop into the bin.
John Blumel

35) From: Brett Mason
Good point John (My Zass is a knee mill)...
I usually tap it before pulling the drawer...
  Still cleaner than the crap clogging my electric burr grinder...
     AND OMG Better than my Cuisinart GNB...
Brett
On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 19:05:48 -0500, John Blumel
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

36) From: Rick Copple
Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks Brett, glad to know that for when I go to get one at some point, 
if that comes.
<Snip>
Ah, you use the "press" setting for drip. I actually made drip the first 
time today using the Zass, and it seemed too bitter. Perhaps too fine. I 
used the suggested 1 turn setting.
<Snip>
I like the Zass, even if it might be the cause of my problems. I'm sure 
if it is the grinder, it was just a fluke that I ended up with a 
defective one. Practically anyone that has bought one seems to like it. 
I kind of like watching the beans get gobbled up down the hole!
I also have not had a lot of mess with it. It seems to operate fairly 
clean. The tips sheet recommends running rice through it once every 3 
months. I've only had mine for about a week now, and have been doing 
quite a bit of grinding, but it seems pretty clean so far.
It is obviously good quality, and it could be I just need to learn how 
to use it better.
That said, does your knob drift at all on you?
Also, what manner do you turn the handle, with pressure, aggressively, 
carefully, and what type of their grinder do you have (I think you said 
knee one at one point). Would the closed hopper be a more stable 
grinding support than the open hopper design?
Still brainstorming in TX!
-- 
Reader Timothy Copplehttp://www.orthodoxconvert.infohttp://www.theforerunner.org

37) From: Angelo
I use a rubber band twisted around the knob. Some here have used Locktite, 
Refer to the archives for the color needed..
A.
<Snip>

38) From: AlChemist John
And even with the Locktite, you can still adjust the knob.  You just have 
to "break" the seal, but the residual in the threads prevents drift.
Sometime around 22:24 1/28/2005, Angelo typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

39) From: David Johnson
My wife has some shoulder problems that make it difficult for her to use a
horizontal crank grinder. Other than the wall mounted Zass's, are there
any good quality verticle crank hand mills?

40) From: Brett Mason
Hi David,
 I would recommend a good electric - it's what I would do if my wife had th=
e 
shoulder concern... One alternate would be to find a "Wheel Grinder" which=
 
is a vertically oriented product. The wheel actually makes the cranking 
easier too. Most of the time these are older, antique, and cost way too 
much... Thus the recommendation for a good electric...
 Regards,
Brett
 Zassman
 On 6/6/05, David Johnson  wrote: 
<Snip>
a
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
__]_
_(( )_ Please don't spill the coffee!

41) From: David Johnson
There are a couple of reasons that may not be best in this case.
First of all, I heve a nice Rocky in the coffee section of the counter,
but my wife is reluctant to use it. I don't think she wants to mess with
my gadgets, but maybe in the future. She has decided she really likes the
coffee from my new FP and figuring out the right grind for FP may push her
into using the grinding by the numbers with Rocky. So far she seems more
inclined to let me make the coffee. Being waited on appeals to her now and
then.
On the other hand, she would have a hard time conceding that she has to
use the electric because of her shoulder. She is "determined" sometimes.
We do live in the country and lose power occasionally. She feels the hand
grinder is a way to prepare for that.
There was a nice looking "ELMA" grinder on eBay that went for $34. But I
think I wanted to have a better idea of what to look for.
<Snip>

42) From: Brett Mason
The wheel grinders are good to consider then, because the wheel evens out=
 
the grinding movement, and keeps the momentum going. See if you can't find=
 
something along those lines.
 I love my Zass, my Rocky, and my 1950's Cory Electric Mill....
 Regards,
Brett
 On 6/6/05, David Johnson  wrote: 
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
__]_
_(( )_ Please don't spill the coffee!

43) From: Rick Copple
I tried to post this a week or two ago, but it bounced back and I never 
got around to sending it again until now.
I currently use a Zass, which seems to do a good job. I've also heard 
they are good for espresso grinds, how that compares with some of the 
electric grinders often mentioned here I don't know.
That said, I've wondered about how easy it is to switch between beans in 
most of these grinders. In my Zass, I only grind the beans I need for 
one pot. So I never have beans sitting in the hopper. One hopper full 
makes one pot of coffee. Being the variety type guy I am, I tend to have 
about 4-5 roasted beans at a time to chose from on my shelf, and I'll 
pick what to grind and brew each time based on what I particularly feel 
like drinking at the moment. So, I never brew several pots of any one 
coffee in a row, almost every pot will be a different bean than before.
Not having had any experience with these bigger grinders, with huge 
hoppers that can hold a bunch of beans, I'm wondering how easy it is to 
switch out beans. Some comments I've heard make it sound like you have 
to purge out the old beans in the grinder before you can grind fresh 
beans. Could you, if you wanted to, just grind enough beans for one pot? 
IOW, your hopper is empty, you get the right amount of beans for one pot 
and throw them in and grind them up? Then next time you thrown in some 
other beans and do the same? Is that possible, on some, which ones?
If I ever get into the position of getting something more than my Zass, 
I would want one that I can switch from one bean to another easily and 
without wasting beans to do it. I would prefer to grind only one pot at 
a time and not leave beans sitting in the hopper. That doesn't seem to 
be the best way to store them.
Also, I don't really understand this doser thing. From comments and what 
I've been told, it sounds like some device that holds ground coffee and 
helps measure it into a portafilter. Does that mean you can end up with 
ground coffee just sitting in there for a long period? Can you grind 
enough for one shot and not end up wasting much? Why use a doser, as it 
sounds like you can grind right into the portafilter on many of them. 
What does it do for you?
Well that is more than one question. :-)
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX

44) From: Les
I have a doserless Mazzer Major. Ten scoops for the Bodum go in the hopper.=
 
I grind into a small Tupperware bowl and it goes in the Vac Pot. No beans=
 
left in the hopper. A quick vac job with my small dedicated vacuum and the=
 
Major is ready to go again. For espresso or another type of brew, I simply=
 
move the grind setting. When I had a Mazzer Super Jolly with a doser. The=
 
only difference was a secondary step of sweeping the coffee into the 
Tupperware with the doser. I don't store beans in the hopper.
 Les
P.S. the aroma of the grind really fills the air! One advantage over the 
Zass. Don't get me wrong. I love my Zass.
 On 8/30/05, Rick Copple  wrote: 
<Snip>

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46) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Aug 30, 2005, at 11:34 PM, Rick Copple wrote:
<Snip>
Rick,
     I'll focus on the doser parts of your inquiry.
The doser was invented to improve efficiency in the coffee shop/ 
espresso bar environment.  In my opinion it is a real pain in the *ss  
in the home environment.
Why use a doser?  Many of us end up with machines made for coffee  
shops because we have found that machines made for the home are  
simply inadequate.  They come with dosers and it is often too much  
trouble to take them off.
Can you grind enough for one shot and not end up wasting much?  I  
have gotten better at this but I still waste enough that it pains  
me.  Constant push to wanting to remove the doser from my Mazzer Major.

47) From: jim-seaman
I tried to post this a week or two ago, but it bounced back and I never 
got around to sending it again until now.
I currently use a Zass, which seems to do a good job. I've also heard 
they are good for espresso grinds, how that compares with some of the 
electric grinders often mentioned here I don't know.
That said, I've wondered about how easy it is to switch between beans in 
most of these grinders. In my Zass, I only grind the beans I need for 
one pot. So I never have beans sitting in the hopper. One hopper full 
makes one pot of coffee. Being the variety type guy I am, I tend to have 
about 4-5 roasted beans at a time to chose from on my shelf, and I'll 
pick what to grind and brew each time based on what I particularly feel 
like drinking at the moment. So, I never brew several pots of any one 
coffee in a row, almost every pot will be a different bean than before.
Not having had any experience with these bigger grinders, with huge 
hoppers that can hold a bunch of beans, I'm wondering how easy it is to 
switch out beans. Some comments I've heard make it sound like you have 
to purge out the old beans in the grinder before you can grind fresh 
beans. Could you, if you wanted to, just grind enough beans for one pot? 
IOW, your hopper is empty, you get the right amount of beans for one pot 
and throw them in and grind them up? Then next time you thrown in some 
other beans and do the same? Is that possible, on some, which ones?
If I ever get into the position of getting something more than my Zass, 
I would want one that I can switch from one bean to another easily and 
without wasting beans to do it. I would prefer to grind only one pot at 
a time and not leave beans sitting in the hopper. That doesn't seem to 
be the best way to store them.
Also, I don't really understand this doser thing. From comments and what 
I've been told, it sounds like some device that holds ground coffee and 
helps measure it into a portafilter. Does that mean you can end up with 
ground coffee just sitting in there for a long period? Can you grind 
enough for one shot and not end up wasting much? Why use a doser, as it 
sounds like you can grind right into the portafilter on many of them. 
What does it do for you?
Well that is more than one question. :-)
I tried to post this a week or two ago, but it bounced back and I never 
got around to sending it again until now.
I currently use a Zass, which seems to do a good job. I've also heard 
they are good for espresso grinds, how that compares with some of the 
electric grinders often mentioned here I don't know.
That said, I've wondered about how easy it is to switch between beans in 
most of these grinders. In my Zass, I only grind the beans I need for 
one pot. So I never have beans sitting in the hopper. One hopper full 
makes one pot of coffee. Being the variety type guy I am, I tend to have 
about 4-5 roasted beans at a time to chose from on my shelf, and I'll 
pick what to grind and brew each time based on what I particularly feel 
like drinking at the moment. So, I never brew several pots of any one 
coffee in a row, almost every pot will be a different bean than before.
Not having had any experience with these bigger
  grinders, with huge 
hoppers that can hold a bunch of beans, I'm wondering how easy it is to 
switch out beans. Some comments I've heard make it sound like you have 
to purge out the old beans in the grinder before you can grind fresh 
beans. Could you, if you wanted to, just grind enough beans for one pot? 
IOW, your hopper is empty, you get the right amount of beans for one pot 
and throw them in and grind them up? Then next time you thrown in some 
other beans and do the same? Is that possible, on some, which ones?
If I ever get into the position of getting something more than my Zass, 
I would want one that I can switch from one bean to another easily and 
without wasting beans to do it. I would prefer to grind only one pot at 
a time and not leave beans sitting in the hopper. That doesn't seem to 
be the best way to store them.
Also, I don't really understand this doser thing. From comments and what 
I've been told, it 
 sounds like some device that holds ground coffee and 
helps measure it into a portafilter. Does that mean you can end up with 
ground coffee just sitting in there for a long period? Can you grind 
enough for one shot and not end up wasting much? Why use a doser, as it 
sounds like you can grind right into the portafilter on many of them. 
What does it do for you?
Well that is more than one question. :-)

48) From: jim-seaman
Sorry for the previous post - Darn return key mapping...
Rick,
Finally some questions I can answer! :)
--
That said, I've wondered about how easy it is to switch between beans in 
most of these grinders.
--
Its kind of a pain.  If you've got beans in the hopper you usually have to pick it up and tip it upside down to dump them into a container.  Some have a hopper chute 'guillotine' to stop the beans from flowing down.  If you had a spare hopper you could swap one in with the beans that you want.
I have a Gaggia MDF which is pretty small on the dosing grinder scale of things but I would switch back and forth from regular to decaf fairly often.  Not only do you have the ground coffee in the doser end of the affair to deal with but you have to grind a bit more of the new coffee to force the ground old coffee out of the works - even if you only grind enough for one pot/shot each time.  Not that big deal unless you really want to drink the new coffee or if you don't want the caffinated variety at night...  
This was irritating enough, for me, that I decided that I was going to buy a used spare grinder so that I could dedicate one for decaf and one for regular.  I found a used Brasilia on Craig's list for $100 with a doser.  Thought I knew what it was and mentally scaled it to my MDF.  I basically bought it on the phone.  Imagine my surprise when I got there and found that it was really a re-badged Rossi RR45... Won't even fit under the kitchen cupboards...  Of course, it was a great deal, so I had to buy it anyway.  
This has ceased the pain of switching between decaf and regular, for me, but if you want to swap out coffees a lot, the Zass sounds like a better deal...
Maybe the doserless models have a shorter path from beans to grinds so its less of a pain.
On storing beans in the hopper - I only keep about a 4 day supply in the hopper.
Doser- It is just a device to load 'pre-measured' amounts into a portafilter basket.  I think its meant as a time saver for higher volume applications.  I grind what I need for the job and then cycle the doser till its empty of ground coffee.  If I timed my grinding right, that coincides with the amount that I needed.  Honestly, I would have gone for a doserless model if I didn't find such a good deal on the Rossi. (It has a built in doser as well.) 
I haven't had the pleasure of using a zass so I can't compare the two types but hopefully this helped answer some of the other questions.
Regards,
Jim
Sorry for the previous post - Darn return key mapping...
 
Rick,
 
Finally some questions I can answer! :)
 
--
That said, I've wondered about how easy it is to switch between beans in 
most of these grinders.
--
Its kind of a pain.  If you've got beans in the hopper you usually have to pick it up and tip it upside down to dump them into a container.  Some have a hopper chute 'guillotine' to stop the beans from flowing down.  If you had a spare hopper you could swap one in with the beans that you want.
 
I have a Gaggia MDF which is pretty small on the dosing grinder scale of things but I would switch back and forth from regular to decaf fairly often.  Not only do you have the ground coffee in the doser end of the affair to deal with but you have to grind a bit more of the new coffee to force the ground old coffee out of the works - even if you only grind enough for one pot/shot each time.  Not that big deal unless you really want to drink the new coffee or if you don't want the caffinated variety at night...  
 
This was irritating enough, for me, that I decided that I was going to buy a used spare grinder so that I could dedicate one for decaf and one for regular.  I found a used Brasilia on Craig's list for $100 with a doser.  Thought I knew what it was and mentally scaled it to my MDF.  I basically bought it on the phone.  Imagine my surprise when I got there and found that it was really a re-badged Rossi RR45... Won't even fit under the kitchen cupboards...  Of course, it was a great deal, so I had to buy it anyway.  
 
This has ceased the pain of switching between decaf and regular, for me, but if you want to swap out coffees a lot, the Zass sounds like a better deal...
 
Maybe the doserless models have a shorter path from beans to grinds so its less of a pain.
 
On storing beans in the hopper - I only keep about a 4 day supply in the hopper.
Doser- It is just a device to load 'pre-measured' amounts into a portafilter basket.  I think its meant as a time saver for higher volume applications.  I grind what I need for the job and then cycle the doser till its empty of ground coffee.  If I timed my grinding right, that coincides with the amount that I needed.  Honestly, I would have gone for a doserless model if I didn't find such a good deal on the Rossi. (It has a built in doser as well.) 
I haven't had the pleasure of using a zass so I can't compare the two types but hopefully this helped answer some of the other questions.
 
Regards,
 
Jim
 

49) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Rick,
I recently graduated to a Rocky doserless.  Didn't want a doser
(another part of the machine to clean, not needed since I only grind
for me or friends - not a coffee shop, more flexibility to grind into
portafilter or Swiss Gold basket, etc.).
I've kept my old, Cuisinart burr grinder.  Changing up and down on the
Rocky between espresso and drip/presspot is kind of a hassle.
Sometimes I'll want an espresso, after having a mug of drip.  Just
more work than I want to deal with, but not really a huge hassle.
Normally, I only put enough beans in the hopper for whatever I'm
brewing.  Don't use it to "store" beans.  But if you do, it would be a
hassle to change beans - you would have to pick up the Rocky and dump
the beans out of the hopper and out of the burr area.
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
Espressing myself in a LaPavoni
(and drip/moka/presspots)

50) From: Peter Zulkowski
Hi Rick,
A bit over a year ago I bought a Mazzer Mini (big budget stretch) and 
never put more grinds into the hopper than I use for a pot. Actually I 
weigh out what I use on a gram scale, dump it in and grind.
While it is grinding I work the lever on the doser.
Kinda fun, makes a good clicking sound imho.
When done I remove the hopper, knock down the beans that got hung up 
under it.
After that, I take the cover off the doser and sweep everything above to 
the floor of the doser, then lever that out also.
So I always have a pretty clean MM to grind the next batch with.
When I bought the Mini, I picked up a general purpose 1" brush at a 
hardware store. The bristles were then over an inch long, but now are 
about a half inch, so now they do not reach into the burs anymore while 
they are running.
With my Zass, I need to grind a couple of hoppers to get a pot, so I do 
not use it very often.
My guess is you could grind just a small amount with any coffee grinder, 
and clean it similarly so the next batch would be fresh.
Mostly we grind Harrar, but I like to try other coffee, and I have never 
had a problem switching to another bean.
Hope this helps,
PeterZ
Rick Copple wrote:
<Snip>

51) From: Rick Copple
Hey, thanks everyone for responding with such good info. I think I have 
a better idea, when the time comes, what to look for.
1. Sounds like the doser is mostly made for commercial environments and 
best to get a grinder without one, if possible, but not always practical.
2. You can in most brew for just one pot. I guess my concern is that 
when the beans run out, does it do any damage to the burrs since they 
run at a high speed. I guess that might only be a concern with espresso 
grind where the burrs are real close to each other, but on drip or 
higher probably not an issue.
3. Sounds like for my brewing preferences, I would need one that can be 
easily set for different grind settings without too much trouble, easy 
to clean out the beans you just ground and don't waste too much doing 
so, preferably doserless, and of course it goes without saying, does a 
good consistent grind at most settings, especially espresso levels. For 
those who are familiar with most of the models out there, is there one 
or two you would recommend that would fit this bill most closely? How 
about any that are close to $100 (not counting snagging a good deal on 
Ebay for something)?
Thanks for all the input. :-)
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX

52) From: Rick Copple
Les wrote:
[snip]
<Snip>
Cool. I love the smell of many of the ground coffees while I'm grinding 
in my Zass. If it gets even better with other grinders, I have something 
more to look forward too. I guess when it grinds more in a shorter 
amount of time, you condense the release of the smells so it is 
stronger, I would assume. :-)
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX

53) From: French Lewis
Hi Rick.
I have a Gaggia MDF, which can be had for about $200. 
 It has a doser, which I find unnecessary, but not a
tremendous drawback.   I use my Zass knee mill for vac
pot and french press and the MDF for espresso only.  
However, it is very easy to change grind level on the
MDF, so it could be a very good general purpose
grinder.    
The things I really like about this grinder is the
consistency of grind for espresso by naked eye
examinaiton, I've never set up a filter screen or used
a jewelers loupe, dissecting microscope or electron
microscope to closely examine the grinds :) and the
fact it is very easy to disassemble to give a proper
cleaning.    
While it is more expensive than you would like, I
believe it will last longer than a Solis Maestro or
other just over $100 burr grinder that has the burrs
in a plastic housing.   Also, the burrs on the MDF are
replaceable, so you don't have to throw away the whole
unit when you wear down the burrs (which, I've been
told will take place after hundreds of pounds of
coffee)
I hope this helps.
french
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54) From: Tara Kollas
I have a Rocky doserless, which I use for just espresso and a Zass that I=
 
use for everything else. Love them both. Although the Rocky is still pretty=
 
messy - I've heard the doser is messier, but that seems tough to believe. I=
 
have a dust buster I keep in the laundry room and use it to suck the trappe=
d 
grounds out of the chute after I'm done for the day. Seemed annoying at 
first, but now I'm used to it and it's just part of the routine. I've heard=
 
the macap M4 with the doser isn't so messy, but it's also over $400!
Tara
 On 9/1/05, French Lewis  wrote: 
<Snip>

55) From: Rick Copple
French Lewis wrote:
<Snip>
Sounds like a good choice then! Thanks.
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX

56) From: Edward Spiegel
I have had a Gaggia MDF for 15 years and it is a terrific grinder. The grind quality is the same as the Rocky but the doser is less than optimal (but certainly workable given the great grind quality and price). I use it for everything from espresso to vac to french press.
Best,
Edward
At 10:21 PM -0500 9/1/05, Rick Copple wrote:
<Snip>

57) From: Demian Ebert
I use my rocky for both press pot and espresso. I just toss the first
teaspoon or so of grounds when switching to espresso from another grind
setting. When switching to press pot I don't worry about the minor amount of
fines that you'll get. I don't have enough counter space to use multiple
grinders.
Demian
On 7/30/06, chsteward  wrote:
<Snip>

58) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
If you have room for both grinders on your counter use the Rocky for =
espresso. I would love to have enough space to run 2 grinders. As far as =
the Brewtus any coffee you mentioned will give an excellent cup except =
the coffee it came with. Mine came with a Kilo of espresso with a use by =
date of 2008. Think it wound up on Mike's compost pile,

59) From: raymanowen
Dear Christina,
You have exercised great foresight, because "I bought a Rocky grinder for my
foray into espresso." In my opinion, it's a great machine.
If you truly enjoy coffee, I'm sure your association with Rocky will be more
than just a liaison  affair. I don't think you actually need a
purpose-specific grinder to use for different brewing methods. I could see a
different vacuum for each floor, but Rocky is adjustable.
How would you contaminate a coffee grinder? Will you be grinding your own
peanut butter, or linoleum floor tile for recycling? Otherwise, if you're
just grinding coffee beans, are you making so much coffee that you'd want a
grinder set up near each machine?
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

60) From: rnkyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<> How would you contaminate a coffee grinder?
Grinding flavored coffee will mess a grinder up. It leave the flavor =
residue and will effect the grinding of regular coffee. Some coffees are =
flavored by syrups and not oils. but either way if leave the flavor =
behind.
If you like flavored coffee get a whirly blade grinder for those. No I =
do not drink flavored coffee, but know some due
RK

61) From: Sandy Andina
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I make my singing partner, who prefers foo-foo flavored coffees,  
grind her own before we travel and use her own pourover filter so it  
doesn't contaminate my Zass (or even the whirly-blade), Aeropress,  
travel presses or even the hotel's coffeemaker (which, if she uses, I  
insist she use with her own paper filters and not my Swissgold  
basket). She gets up an hour ahead of me, but that disgusting  
flavored-coffee aroma wakes me up and makes me retch. To think only  
ten years ago I used to put vanilla beans or cinnamon sticks in with  
the grounds when I made drip--or that twenty years ago I willingly  
drank flavored coffee (bleccccch). Only way I'll go near flavorings  
now is if I'm drinking iced soy lattes, to kill the grass-chalk taste  
(or sometimes watered-down iced breves--half a squirt of sugar-free  
vanilla is all I can abide in the way of adulteration).
On Jul 31, 2006, at 6:30 AM, rnkyle wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
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I make my singing partner, who =
prefers foo-foo flavored coffees, grind her own before we travel and use =
her own pourover filter so it doesn't contaminate my Zass (or even the =
whirly-blade), Aeropress, travel presses or even the hotel's coffeemaker =
(which, if she uses, I insist she use with her own paper filters and not =
my Swissgold basket). She gets up an hour ahead of me, but that =
disgusting flavored-coffee aroma wakes me up and makes me retch. To =
think only ten years ago I used to put vanilla beans or cinnamon sticks =
in with the grounds when I made drip--or that twenty years ago I =
willingly drank flavored coffee (bleccccch). Only way I'll go near =
flavorings now is if I'm drinking iced soy lattes, to kill the =
grass-chalk taste (or sometimes watered-down iced breves--half a squirt =
of sugar-free vanilla is all I can abide in the way of =
adulteration).
On Jul 31, 2006, at 6:30 AM, rnkyle =
wrote:
<> How would you contaminate a = coffee grinder?Grinding flavored coffee = will mess a grinder up. It leave the flavor residue and will effect the = grinding of regular coffee. Some coffees are flavored by syrups and not = oils. but either way if leave the flavor behind.If you like = flavored coffee get a whirly blade grinder for those. No I do not drink = flavored coffee, but know some dueRK

62) From: Angelo
I, too, have a doserless Rocky and use it to grind for various 
brewing methods. By "contaminate", I take it you mean not having the 
various sized grinds mixing with each other. The idea is to fully 
empty the present grind, so that you won't have any left for the next 
grinding. This can be nicely done using something to "puff" some air 
into the throat of the grinder so that the lingering grounds are 
expelled with the rest.
For this, I use the bellows thing that came with the egg peeler( I 
forget the eggxact name, but I'm sure someone else hasn't, and will 
supply it). You could also use a hair dryer(on the COOL setting) or a 
can of air...Even lifting the Rocky about a half inch in the front 
and dropping it will do the trick...
A+
<Snip>

63) From: raymanowen
OK, OK- UNCLE Again!
I hate it when I'm wrong so much, but I get the point.
Hmmm- I guess I have seen it in the volume sales emporia- a separate grinder
for Flavored coffee. So I guess the specific flavor is of no consequence-
they don't contaminate each other.?? Just the flavored coffee and real
coffee. Got it!
There's a nice round bellows in the top of a broken thrift store air pot. I
use it on top of the MM after grinding for a brew to get all the grounds
into the brewer or pf.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
More time, less dumb-

64) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
That's what I do too. But wouldn't it be nice to have the luxury and =
space to have two grinders. One set for espresso and one set for brewed =
coffee. When I build my coffee room there will be at least 2 =
Mazzers,floor to ceiling book cases, overstuffed leather armchairs and =
ottomans, a Probat,sink,fridge and The Brute. The center piece for the =
room will be one of those huge old copper boiler lever machines, with an =
Eagle on top, the machine itself sits on top of a 100 pound slab of =
marble. It doesn't even have to work. Just be there.Now on to win the =
World Series of Poker to make my dream come true.

65) From: Brett Mason
Diversify people!
My Rocky sits next to my UNIC Diva, on teh espresso station in the
sunroom, which backs up to the kitchen counter.
Across the kitchen sits my 1950's Cory electric grinder alongside my
Melitta Clarity.
Mr. Zass lives in the cupboard above the Clarity, next to my Mokkapot.
Back at the espresso station is also where my 1930's Quik-Drip 18-cup
and my Cory VacPots live.
The Trosser is downstairs on in the shop, disassembled on my
workbench, cause I am flattening out warped wood and working on
refinishing it...  This is where my next two UNIC machines are also
going - they'll be here in a couple weeks...
At work is where Bodum FP and my 2nd Zass live, along with my
whirley-gig grinder and a swissgold one-cup.
On 7/31/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
   Zassman

66) From: Les
Brett,
You have been bitten by the coffee bug!  My Mazzer Major is in the
garage just off the kitchen.  The Zass is sitting between two vac
pots.  The Expobar is on the counter in the kitchen right next to it
is the Techivorm.  My KPB is my brewer at work.  I have a shelf in the
kitchen with various other brewers.  By depression era vac-pot sits on
the back of the stove.  I am planning on making a coffee center in the
corner of the garage, with some brewers and by RK drum this fall.
Les
On 7/31/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

67) From: Sandy Andina
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My Mazzer Mini and Rocky are on one counter next to my Livia and  
Silvia.  The SM+ and Bodum Antigua are on another counter near the  
Technivorm. The Aeropress sits in the dishrack for ready use. The  
Zass Turkish and the Starbucks blade grinder live in a tote bag along  
with other portable coffee paraphernalia--the bag goes into the car  
for driving trips, and selected items (depending on what brewing and  
water-heating equipment is available at my destination) go into my  
checked baggage for air travel.
On Jul 31, 2006, at 1:14 PM, Les wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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My Mazzer Mini and Rocky are on =
one counter next to my Livia and Silvia. The SM+ and Bodum Antigua =
are on another counter near the Technivorm. The Aeropress sits in the =
dishrack for ready use. The Zass Turkish and the Starbucks blade grinder =
live in a tote bag along with other portable coffee paraphernalia--the =
bag goes into the car for driving trips, and selected items (depending =
on what brewing and water-heating equipment is available at my =
destination) go into my checked baggage for air travel.
On=
 Jul 31, 2006, at 1:14 PM, Les wrote:
Brett,You have been = bitten by the coffee bug! = My Mazzer Major is in thegarage just = off the kitchen. The = Zass is sitting between two vacpots. The Expobar is on the counter = in the kitchen right next to itis the = Techivorm. My KPB is my = brewer at work. I have a = shelf in thekitchen with various other = brewers. By depression = era vac-pot sits onthe back of the stove. I am planning on making a = coffee center in thecorner of the garage, with = some brewers and by RK drum this fall. Les On = 7/31/06, Brett Mason <homeroast> = wrote: Diversify = people! My Rocky sits next to my UNIC Diva, on teh espresso = station in thesunroom, which backs up to the = kitchen counter. Across the kitchen sits my 1950's Cory electric = grinder alongside myMelitta Clarity. Mr. Zass = lives in the cupboard above the Clarity, next to my Mokkapot. Back at = the espresso station is also where my 1930's Quik-Drip 18-cupand my Cory VacPots live. The = Trosser is downstairs on in the shop, disassembled on myworkbench, cause I am flattening out warped wood and = working onrefinishing it... This is where my next two = UNIC machines are alsogoing - they'll be here in = a couple weeks... At work is where Bodum FP and my 2nd Zass live, = along with mywhirley-gig grinder and a = swissgold one-cup. On = 7/31/06, Barry Luterman <lutermanb001&= gt; wrote:>> That's what I do too. But wouldn't it be nice = to have the luxury and space> to have = two grinders. One set for espresso and one set for brewed = coffee.> When I build my coffee room = there will be at least 2 Mazzers,floor to> = ceiling book cases, overstuffed leather armchairs and ottomans, = a> Probat,sink,fridge and The Brute. The = center piece for the room will be one> of = those huge old copper boiler lever machines, with an Eagle on top, = the> machine itself sits on top = of a 100 pound slab of marble. It doesn't even> have to work. Just be there.Now on to win the = World Series of Poker to make> my dream = come true.>>

68) From: Andrew Karre
Hello all,
I'm new to roasting and to the list, and have been enjoying=
 everything immensely. I'm pretty sure the current weak link in my roaster-=
grinder-brewer chain is the grinder, which is an antique Hobart/Kitchen Aid=
 A9 coffee mill (the one with the horizontal shoot, etc.). I'm debating bet=
ween two options for a new grinder: the Solis Maestro or one of the Lodos m=
anual coffee mills (like the now-unattainable Zassenhaus). A Rocky is out o=
f my price range at this time. I'm leaning toward the Lodos, because I rath=
er like the idea of a manual grinder and it's less expensive, but mainly I =
want a better grinder, so I would happily look at other options in the Soli=
s Maestro/$150 range. For what it's worth, I don't make espresso and I gene=
rally brew with a vac pot.
(And while I'm asking for tips, can anyone =
point me to a reliably excellent shot of espresso in the Twin Cities?)
=
Thanks much,
Andrew Karre

69) From: Scjgb3
welcome, 
imo the vac pot is very forgiving as for as the grind goes. I have a Cory  
vac pot and have used a whirly blade and a burr grinder. in a blind test i  
couldn't tell the difference between the two. some of the seniors here with  a 
more sensitive pallet might disagree.  i would save my money for the  rocky, mine 
is coming this week, i hope,  thanks to SM. 
scjgb3

70) From: Tom Maynard
Andrew,
I have a Zassenhaus (apparently one of the last) and I can recommend it
wholeheartedly.  The drawbacks of a manual mill (of any type) are: speed (it
takes a few moments), effort (some strength is required), and batch size (it
only holds a small amount of coffee in the drawer).
The positive points are: excellent steel burrs that will not wear in your
lifetime, infinitely adjustable grinds, very even grinds, no heat build up,
minimal static (except when the humidity drops below about 30%).  It's also
about half the price of the entry level, quality electric grinders.
Of course, you know all this already.
For me, a full hopper grinds a full drawer which is precisely the amount of
coffee I need to brew a full pot (20 oz, FP) yielding two mugs of coffee.
If you routinely grind more than this amount, you will have to run multiple
batches, with all the associated dumping/filling/grinding/dumping steps.  If I
had to run multiple batches daily I would either modify my Zass (remove the
bottom and drawer and grind directly into a bowl or something), or replace it
with an electric grinder.
At least from the pictures I've seen on the 'Net the Lodos mills look
practically identical to the Zassenhaus; of course I've only seen the outside.
What ultimately sold me was: the grind quality of a Rocky for a bit more money
than a whirley-blade.  I simply lucked out on the batch size being ideal for
me.
HTH,
t.

71) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
If possible save for a Rocky. It's so important you might want to =
consider a second mortgage

72) From: woodsrw
When I use the Lodos it takes 875 +/- turns to grind one 5 table spoons or 3/4 ounce.  About 25 minutes.  I grind fine, about twice the size of salt.  The electric grinder I use for now is a Krups type GVX1, it grinds just a bit larger than the Lodos and takes seconds but creates a lot of static in the grinds.  When using the hand grinder most beans grind easily but the Bolivia Peaberry is a little harder to grind.
woods

postamble(); When I use the Lodos it takes 875 +/- turns to grind one 5 table spoons or 3/4 ounce.  About 25 minutes.  I grind fine, about twice the size of salt.  The electric grinder I use for now is a Krups type GVX1, it grinds just a bit larger than the Lodos and takes seconds but creates a lot of static in the grinds.  When using the hand grinder most beans grind easily but the Bolivia Peaberry is a little harder to grind.

woods

 


73) From: raymanowen
Andrew, don't assume your grinder is doing evil things to your coffee before
you inspect the grounds closely. (The bottom line is, what does your palate
tell you?)
Take notes.
What is your range of adjustment from finest to gravel coarse?
If you can easily acquire a 10X magnifying eye loupe, use that to inspect
the grind quality from a couple of different settings near the fine end. You
should be able to see the difference in the grounds sitting next to each
other on fine lined graph paper.
If you can't find a loupe for cheap at the hardware / hobby store, check
 online.
Take a look at the grounds near the mid range setting and at the coarse
setting.
The coarse grounds will also have some very fine particulate dust with them-
you want as little of that as possible.
You could improve things by dismantling the machine and cleaning the burrs
with a stiff-bristled automotive parts cleaning brush/ brass wire brush,
etc. Some clean is good. More is better, and there's no such thing as Too
clean. Just stop in time for dinner, and take notes so you can reassemble
it.
Check online ahead of time to see if new burrs are available. Don't replace
it you can rebuild it and use it. It's a worthy project if you can get some
good use out of it.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

74) From: Derek Bradford
Hi All,
I'm looking for a grinder for work.  I have a Gaggia Classic to bring
to work, but it needs a grinder; I don't want to bring mine from home
all the time. My plan is to eBay it and find something cheap and used;
the great lucky find.  There are always Gaggia MDFs available; are
they capable grinders for espresso?  I don't want to use my zass; I'm
looking for something I don't have to crank.
Any suggestions?
Thanks,
--Derek
-- http://www.novernae.comHome of the Wandering Sloth

75) From: Mike Chester
The MDF is a decent grinder for espresso though it has a limited number of 
grind steps.  I used one for about 8 months before getting my Mini.  I have 
the MDF for sale for a reasonable price.  If you are interested, contact me 
off list.
Mike Chester

76) From: MSMB
Has anyone used one of the manual wall grinders that say they can be used
for corn, soy beans, etc as well as coffee beans?  They say you can do from
course to fine grind.
MS

77) From:
I have a rocky doserless...been pretty happy with it...but have little to compare it to.
I have the opportunity to get a cheap cunill tauro (also the same as an astra grinder) with 60 mm burrs.
Does anyone have any experience with these. Reviewers on CG had mentioned that it was just a small step down from a mazzer mini. Don't know how true that is....just trying to see if its worth it for me. I have no real need for two big grinders...but if it kicks (and beats rocky)  maybe its worth it.
Thanks.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo phone.
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78) From: Les
I doubt it will "kick" the Rocky.  I wouldn't consider either of them
as big grinders.  60mm burrs are good!  However keeping the burrs too
long on any grinder will take the "kick" out of them.  I don't see
that the Mini is that much better than a Rocky.  I have done some head
to head comparisons with those two.  Personally, I like the biggest
grinder possible, or a good conical over a flat burr, however I
settled with a Hybrid, that I like a lot.  When you consider that
replacement burrs for a conical run in the $300-400 range (burrs
only!), the Hybrid looks even better.  The flat portion of the burrs
that wear much faster can be replaced for less than $50.00.   I would
make sure replacement burrs are available and their price before
buying any grinder.
Les
On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 11:06 PM,   wrote:
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