HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Blending (36 msgs / 984 lines)
1) From: Doug.A.Mccullough
The most recent issue of Wine Spectator includes an article
about fine coffee. (It is remiss in not mentioning Sweet Maria's
but that is another matter.) The author asserts that a blend of
coffees is often a better cup than a single appellation because
strengths of one of the varieties can supplant weaknesses of
another. For example one might pair a bean with great complexity
but little body with one having great body but little complexity
to get a more balancd cup.
I know Sweet Maria's offers blends. I have thoroughly enjoyed
their Monkey Expresso and French Roast Blends. This post is to
solicit input on blending.
Should one even consider blending? 
What blends have members of this digest tried with success?
Which blends employ beans than can be roasted together?
Which beans should be roasted separately before blending?
Can anyone offer advice on "starter" blends to try to help me
begin designing combinations of my own?
Thanks in advance for your input.
Doug McCullough
Indian Springs, AL
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Ken Mary
Blending is an individual choice. I have been enjoying homeroasted coffees
for a year now and have no thought of blending. My desires are more
academic, trying to find the best roast for a given bean, learning its taste
profile, and comparing it to others.
--
Ken Mary - Aromaroast, Popper - whirlyblade - decanter
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Michael Allen Smith
Tom said it best:http://sweetmarias.com/blending.htmlmas
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Anthony
Doug-
You've touched on a huge topic.  Here are a few ideas based on my experience.
 I'll also see if I can dig out some of the interesting recipes that
have come up in the past.
---- Doug.A.Mccullough wrote:
<Snip>
Of course.  Experimenting with all the variables is what makes this hobby
so much fun.
<Snip>
Many have come up with some rather involved blends using five or six
different beans.  These are the advanced espresso makers in the group.
 For non-espresso uses, a two- or three-bean blend us usually sufficient.
<Snip>
Before getting serious about blending, it's a good idea to learn how
different beans behave, and how the roast level affects how each tastes.
 Then you'll develop an idea of how to coordinate complimentary profiles.
To answer the question, beans that achieve the appropriate roast color
at the same time can be roasted together.  When you want one bean to
be bright and flavorful and another to be deep and pungent, naturally
you'd roast separately.  Pre-roast blending seems to make a more homogeneous
flavor, while post-roast blending maintains the unique points of each
constituent better, at least to my palate.  
<Snip>
Try a Mocha-Java blend.  Since this term is so loosely defined, it's
easy to "get it right."  Basically, take a deep, full-bodied coffee like
a Sumatra or Sulawesi and blend it about 50-50 with something with a
unique flavor, like one of the Yemens or Ethiopians.
I've also had good results with many "leftover blends."  (Small amounts
of whatever is left in the cabinet at the end of the week get thrown
together into a pot.)
<Snip>
We're all learning here, and I've always appreciated the advice offered
by members of this group too.  
- Anthony
To get your own FREE ZDNet Onebox - FREE voicemail, email, and fax,
all in one place - sign up today athttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.zdnetonebox.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: Steven Dover

6) From: R.N.Kyle
Hey everybody, I was experimenting with a blend, and roasted a 4oz batch =
in my WBPII mod with a 3 way switch. profiled the roast total time 12 =
min. roasted full city no oil
1- Brazilian Monte Carmello 25 percent 1oz.
2- Celebes 37.5 percent    1.5 oz
3- Costa Rica Tarrazue 12.5 percent .5 oz
4- Harrar    25 percent 1oz.
I did no rest press pot the overall was very promising, very slight =
grassy taste do to lack of rest. smooth , nice body, and pleasant =
lingering after taste. I will report after a 24 hr. rest.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: John Abbott
Hey, a new slant on blending commercial coffee!http://www.comics.com/comics/geech/index.htmlThe bug has given up on killing me, and today I woke with a killer
headache - 36 hours without coffee - a first time event. So after a couple
of cups of Miel my headache is gone and life looks really great again.   I
wish they would make Norton for the human body!
John - loving life in the slow lane
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

8) From: Jason Brooks
I thought I'd share a pre-roast blend experience, which is my first.  I 
ran my resurrected WBP1, Phoenix, and tried some pre-roast blending.  I 
ended up roasting the following: a 50/50 of Ethiopian Ghimbi and 
Sualwesi Toraja (1/4 cup each).  I took it to just a few snaps into the 
second, a very pretty Full City Roast.  I tried it this morning as a 
Cafe Crema.  Nice crema, but bad flavor.  So, I tried it as an 
Americano, twice.  It produced a very pleasing cup with a mixture of the 
wild blueberry-cinnamon character of the Ghimbi with the buttery 
smoothness of the Sulawesi.  The aftertaste was incredible!  The flavor 
of the drink itself left a bit to be desired.  I'm not totally 
disappointed for my first shot at blending.
    What started it all was a double shot of Kenya Kanake that was just 
too bright.  I'm trying to figure what may help a Kenya to taste better 
as an espresso.
Jason
-- 
Jason Brooks
jbrooks
-------------------------------
Hanging Out in the Heart of VA,
With HW Gourmet, Poppery, and soon arriving BBQ roasters,
With Bodum Chambord and Krups Gusto brewers,
Drinking good coffee with anyone that arrives!

9) From: Ed Needham
I've had good luck using just a little Kenya in espresso blends.  Kenya seems
to add a clean, interesting finish to espresso.  Too much and it is tangy and
sour, a little and it is clean and pleasant.
The fast extraction, pressurized, finely ground espresso process seems to
bring out brightness in a bean, so if you begin with a classically bright
bean like a Kenya, you'll need sunglasses to drink it.  A little bright
cleans up and adds to the overall experience.
We all have opinions...that's mine.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

10) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
I've been blending a bit, Jim, with good results.  May be just beginner's
luck, but it seems to this beginner that blending offers the tyro a chance
to create some interesting complexity fairly easily.
Actual control is still beyond my modest experience, but even my hit-or-miss
blending - given halfway compatible ingredients, seems to provide a really
nice cup of coffee.
I was reluctant to try blending at first because of my limited roasting
experience...but now I'm beginning to wonder if a beginner doesn't stand a
better chance of getting a nice cup out of a blend, instead of getting a
single bean 'just right.'
Any thoughts from those with a bunch more experience than me?
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

11) From: MMore
Hi, all ~
I'm just starting to try my hand at blending beans and was just curious - 
What flavors do most of you seek to blend?  Citrus with Chocolate?  Earthy 
with Floral?  Also, what are some of your favorite blends for a 'light' cup, a 
'fuller' cup and espresso?
Thanks!
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.

12) From: Jeff Oien
MMore wrote:
<Snip>
A great basic blend is Sumatra and Guatemala. You could even do
a (post) roast blend of two Guats with: Sumatra FC++/Vienna, Guat.
FC+ and Guat City+. Or put Nicaraguan in the middle.
Another is 1/3 Brazil, 2/3 Colombian
Exquisite:
25% Java Djampit
50% Mexican Oaxaca Pluma Hidalgo
25% Nic CoE Semptiembre... (I think this is gone though, Panama,
El Salvador?)
For espresso:
Brazil 20-45% Vienna
Java Djampit FC
Harrar or Nic CoE Septiembre... 20-25% FC
I suppose any African or Yemen would do well
Next I'm going to try a simple preroast blend:
Brazil 50%
Honduras 25% -Organic Marcala (Sumatra is classic component
but I don't like it in espresso, Honduras has big body)
Guatemala 25%
In case you haven't seen it:http://www.sweetmarias.com/blending.htmlJeffO

13) From: Tom Ulmer
Hello-
My opinion is to stay curious and keep experimenting with different things.
My last roast and blend was for a "lighter" cup and consisted of 2 parts
Brasillian yellow bourbon, 1 part Turquesa, 2 parts Ethiopian Fair Trade
Harar.    
A little girly for my tastes (Jan is extremely fond of it).   The resulting
cup has a fruity-vanilla front and ends with a butter-caramel.
The roast previous to this was a truly outstanding blend for a "lighter" cup
of 2 parts Oaxaca Pluma Hidalgo, 1 part Nicaraguan COE 15 de Septiembre, 2
parts Rwandan Gatare. This one was a taste experience- complex and
satisfying - started with a smokey-citrus, progressing to a light and fresh
earthiness and ending with a very light chocolate - the entire taste having
hints of earl grey tea. 
One of my favorites is a 1 to 1 blend using Java Djampit and Bucaramanga.
Brew this one strong and call it the "Hemingway" cup.

14) From: HeatGunRoast heatgunroast
IMO, if you can blend and brew to preserve the bean qualities you
mention (citrus, not sour; chocolate, not burnt or muddy; earthy, not
stinky; etc.) you are doing very well, indeed.  For me, the most
problematic learning curve has not been how-to-blend, or how-to-roast,
but how-to-taste-----that is, learning to recognize the finer flavor
distinctions that could then further inform my roasting and brewing.
The particular balance and proportion of these flavors depends so much
on personal taste and what you keep in your stash.  I think that the
real newbie rule (that I continue to violate!!) is to have a carefully
selected stash that generally emphasizes fewer  varieties so you can
learn more about them over time.  For example, one of my smartest
early purchases was 5 lbs of a wonderful Ethiopian Harrar.  After a
while, I began to feel that I "knew" that coffee----how to roast,
blend, rest, and grind it for my taste and my particular espresso
machine.
Also, given the variability of roasting and brewing circumstances and
methods, a specific blend can produce dramatically different cups even
if personal taste were held constant.
All that said, Jeff's blends seem as promising as any that I could
recommend, even though I'm unlikely to try them exactly as he presents
them here.  (However, I am so taken by his and others' raving about
the Djampit that I've just ordered 2 lbs.)  When blending for
espresso, I generally look first at Tom's "Body" score.  I like around
50% to be rated at close to a "4"  My next category, 25% is what I
think of as a "character" variety.  An aged coffee, a Harar, what you
might have in mind when you say "earthy."  Finally, I add (often, too
much if I roast to Tom's recommended level) a killer bright like a
Kenya or Yirgacheffe.
Happy coffee.
Martin
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 11:40:56 EST, MMore  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: AlChemist John
I like to shoot from chocolate and balanced, but sometimes just "good".  A 
favorite of mine is equal parts Sidamo, Harar, and a heavy Indonesian that 
for the life of me I cannot remember at the moment.
I also rather like a Brazilian Sumatra blend.
Sometime around 08:40 1/14/2005, MMore typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

16) From: Jeff Oien
I friend gave me some Yemen Mokha Ismaili (Hirazi) roasted
to FC and I used 2/3 of that with 1/3 Java Djampit. The sweetest
and most unique espresso I've ever had. What a delicacy. I'd take
that over fish eggs any day.
JeffO

17) From: Les
I am finding have 3 good blending coffees kind of fun to have around. My
last espresso, I went 50% Yellow Bourbon and 50% Nicaragua Septiembre for a
very nice Western Hemisphere blend.
 Les

18) From: Jeff Oien
Les wrote:
<Snip>
That Nic CoE Septiembre 15 (what a long name) is pretty special
isn't it. I just used up the last I had of it. I found that
it tastes really good at a Vienna roast. This roasts out the
fruit and totally changed the bean, but it turns it into a
really big buttery coffee. I tried a triple roast blend of this
once and it was a big success. I also remember liking it with
Java. I bet the blend with Brazil was great.
Next week I'll have Sulawesi, Brazil Dulce, Yemen, Harar and
PNG-Kimel to play with.
JeffO

19) From: Tim Wat
Don't know squat about blending, gave a cursory read to Tom's 
suggestions on the SM site, but been playing with blends for my morning 
brew anyway.  This morning tried equal parts Kenya AA, Malawi Mapanga 
Estate AA and India Kohinoor.  I'm guessing those who really know 
blending would say this isn't the most balanced cup (it's what I have 
roasted at the moment), but talk about a party going on in my mouth!  
Thought I needed a seat belt.
Do most homeroasters drink (non-espresso) SOs, or most eventually 
gravitate toward blending?

20) From: Brian Kamnetz
Tim,
I'm not "most" homeroasters, just one, but I roast just for myself and drink
only one cup a day, so I do not use coffee fast enough to roast different
SOs and blend them.
Brian
On 11/10/06, Tim Wat  wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Tom Ulmer
I typically roast 4-5 different coffees at a session to provision 7-10 days
of consumption. This lends itself nicely to both single origin and
post-roast blending. Pre-roast blends are not usually by design and are the
product of eliminating small quantities from the cupboard.

22) From: Tom Bellhouse

23) From: Jeff Oien
I also only drink one cup a day. I do like to do a couple
preroast blends. One is 3/2/1 Harar/Yemen/Ghimbi. Otherwise
I will roast some Java, split it up into small jars and
freeze what I don't use. Then I can use those little jars
to blend as a small percentage with another bean.
JeffO
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Les
I often will roast with blending in mind.  I also have a couple of blends I
really like and preroast blend and bag them.  I have a couple of Mocha-Java
blends that I do this with as well as a couple of espresso blends.  Right
now I have a very nice Yemen and Sumatra roasted.  I post roast blended
these for a very nice Mocha-Java type blend.  Both are great S.O. as well.
Les
On 11/10/06, Tim Wat  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
my favorite moka java blend has been equal parts of sumatra iskandar and
harrar horse green stripe.
2nd fav is yemen and sumatra iskandar, but that one is almost too earthy..  
From: Les [mailto:les.albjerg] 
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2006 4:26 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Blending
I often will roast with blending in mind.  I also have a couple of blends I
really like and preroast blend and bag them.  I have a couple of Mocha-Java
blends that I do this with as well as a couple of espresso blends.  Right
now I have a very nice Yemen and Sumatra roasted.  I post roast blended
these for a very nice Mocha-Java type blend.  Both are great S.O. as well.
 
Les
On 11/10/06, Tim Wat  wrote: 
Don't know squat about blending, gave a cursory read to Tom's
suggestions on the SM site, but been playing with blends for my morning 
brew anyway.  This morning tried equal parts Kenya AA, Malawi Mapanga
Estate AA and India Kohinoor.  I'm guessing those who really know
blending would say this isn't the most balanced cup (it's what I have
roasted at the moment), but talk about a party going on in my mouth! 
Thought I needed a seat belt.
Do most homeroasters drink (non-espresso) SOs, or most eventually
gravitate toward blending?

26) From: Sergio Kusevitzky
Brazil, Java, Uganda and .... Yemen or Harar 
Strong, heavy body, chocola=
te. Low acidity
----- Original Message ----
From: Jeff Oien 
To: homeroast
Sent: Friday, Nov=
ember 10, 2006 10:58:53 PM
Subject: Re: +Blending
I also only dri=
nk one cup a day. I do like to do a couple
preroast blends. One is 3/2/1 =
Harar/Yemen/Ghimbi. Otherwise
I will roast some Java, split it up into sm=
all jars and
freeze what I don't use. Then I can use those little jars
=
to blend as a small percentage with another bean.
JeffO
Brian Kamnet=
z wrote:
> Tim,
> 
> I'm not "most" homeroasters, just one, but I roa=
st just for myself and 
> drink
> only one cup a day, so I do not use c=
offee fast enough to roast different
> SOs and blend them.
> 
> Brian=
> 
> 
> On 11/10/06, Tim Wat  wrote:
> 
>>=
>> Don't know squat about blending, gave a cursory read to Tom's
>> su=
ggestions on the SM site, but been playing with blends for my morning
>> =
brew anyway.  This morning tried equal parts Kenya AA, Malawi Mapanga
>> =
Estate AA and India Kohinoor.  I'm guessing those who really know
>> blen=
ding would say this isn't the most balanced cup (it's what I have
>> roas=
ted at the moment), but talk about a party going on in my mouth!
>> Thoug=
ht I needed a seat belt.
>>
>> Do most homeroasters drink (non-espresso=
) SOs, or most eventually
>> gravitate toward blending?
>>
>>
>>
=
<Snip>
ist
>>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast>> To ch=
ange your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
>> unsvbscri=
bes) go to
>>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings=>>
>
homeroast=
 mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastT=
o change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscrib=
es) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

27) From: Larry English
A nice gentle Mocha-Java-type blend for me was Sulawesi Toarco and Harar
Horse Lot 30.  Also, that blend 50-50 with El Salvador Las Ranas Decaf
worked out really well as an afternoon brew.
Larry
On 11/10/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

28) From: John Lauck
I'm the only coffee drinker (= fanatic) in my house but I've been reading up
on creating espresso blends.
Those of you that blend... I'm assuming you roast each individually and then
blend afterward.  Does anyone mix their green beans and then roast?
On 11/11/06, Larry English  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Tim Wat
John Lauck wrote:
<Snip>
I only mix post-roast, if I know what each SO tastes like by itself, I 
can shoot for a particular emphasis of each blend component by crude 
ratio. 
I don't have roast skills developed enough to know how to account for 
pre-roast blending.  The end result may be interesting, but it would 
certainly be unintended and completely non-reproducible.
tim

30) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's a difficult thing to do. One has to be sure of the beans optimal =
ramp and crack times. It's much better to blend post roast. An exception =
obviously is Tom's Monkey Blend

31) From: scott miller
I'm currently doing my own blending for espresso this way:
2 separate preroast blends:
Brazil/Yemen: 4/1
Sulawesi/Nicaragua: 3/2
Each of the blends are roasted to FC+ and the 2 roasts are then combined. A
couple times, I have also done a separate roast of Monsooned Malabar &
augmented the total blend weight by 10%. This adds some nice funky notes and
the MM is definitely a crema booster, too.
When I play around with different beans, I'll use a DP Ethiopian in place of
the Yemen for less funk and more chocolate, Sumatra in place of the Sulawesi
for more bass notes, El Sal for Nic gives more sweetness. Obviously, these
are generalities since you can often find a bean that has unusual
characteristics for it origin.
I have also used Uganda Bugisu in some blends. When I use that, I have had
fantastic chocolate with this blend:
Brazil/Ethiopia: 3/2
Sulawesi/Uganda: 3/2
The one thing that's a must when doing espresso blends, IMO, is to keep
notes: roast levels, bean types and blend ratios ... oh, and buy LOTS of
beans! I have made several nice blends and some that I didn't like enough to
repeat, but I have always enjoyed the learning experience. I doubt if I'll
ever hit a blend and say, "there, I've reached Nirvana", but I like having
some notes on what combinations have produced results I feel confident
enough to share with others who know good from not so good espresso blends.
cheers,
Scott
On 11/13/06, John Lauck  wrote:
<Snip>

32) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i just accidentally created a moka-kadir type blend by accident.. im quite
happy with it!  I'll be happy to share it if anyone is interested, and its
not against a group rule or something. :)  
From: John Lauck [mailto:recaffeinated] 
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2006 2:15 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Blending
I'm the only coffee drinker (= fanatic) in my house but I've been reading up
on creating espresso blends.  
Those of you that blend... I'm assuming you roast each individually and then
blend afterward.  Does anyone mix their green beans and then roast? 
On 11/11/06, Larry English  wrote: 
A nice gentle Mocha-Java-type blend for me was Sulawesi Toarco and Harar
Horse Lot 30.  Also, that blend 50-50 with El Salvador Las Ranas Decaf
worked out really well as an afternoon brew.
Larry 
On 11/10/06, Les  wrote: 
I often will roast with blending in mind.  I also have a couple of blends I
really like and preroast blend and bag them.  I have a couple of Mocha-Java
blends that I do this with as well as a couple of espresso blends.  Right
now I have a very nice Yemen and Sumatra roasted.  I post roast blended
these for a very nice Mocha-Java type blend.  Both are great S.O. as well.
Les
On 11/10/06, Tim Wat <   timothywat>
wrote: 
Don't know squat about blending, gave a cursory read to Tom's 
suggestions on the SM site, but been playing with blends for my morning 
brew anyway.  This morning tried equal parts Kenya AA, Malawi Mapanga
Estate AA and India Kohinoor.  I'm guessing those who really know
blending would say this isn't the most balanced cup (it's what I have
roasted at the moment), but talk about a party going on in my mouth! 
Thought I needed a seat belt.
Do most homeroasters drink (non-espresso) SOs, or most eventually
gravitate toward blending?

33) From: Bill Morgan
Yes, please.
On 11/13/06, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: Joe Scarborough
OK, I've been lurking long enough.
Newbie post here guys...fire away...
Subject:
Blends - I want to try some blending and I've read up on it and I think I'll
have a go at pre and post blends to see how they differ.
I'm looking to build a favorite blend for myself and a select group of
friends.
I want to use a Sumatra as a base (because I like it) and I want it to have
some Kenya AA also. Someone suggested Guatemala Antigua as well but I'm
having trouble locating it. I like the bassier, chocolatey flavors but I
want some of the "higher" notes in this as well. Yes, I'm a musician.
I'm looking for balance here. I know some of you have your secret recipes
and I respect that, but give a new guy a push in the right direction.
This is for drip coffee not espresso. I can't afford a fancy espresso
machine. I've got a Mr C "espresso maker" but I'm not at all impressed with
the product.
I've got a Technivorm, FP, AP, and just recently acquired a Chemex. I'm
using a Capresso burr grinder which is a small step up from my old whirly
blade grinder.
Yes, I suffer from CAS (coffee acquisition syndrome).
Hello everybody, I'm Joe and I'm addicted to homeroasted coffee.
~COFFEE~ It's Not Just A Matter Of Life or Death... It's More Important Than
That (yep stole it)
Joe Scarborough
Sent from Pasadena, Texas, United States
Ted Turner   -
"Sports is like a war without the killing."
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

35) From: decrisce.md
Hey Joe,
Lately I have been doing a lot of blends with various leftover beans. I tend not to like the bassier coffees, but rather the crazy fruity ones. 
I try different things all the time-and I enjoy the variety and experience of the process-even if I have not come up with a magical blend. 
I have liked basic backgrounds like a sweet columbian or central, with some african craziness like a yirgacheffe or harrar, maybe even a high toned kenya, and a little bit of monsooned malabar-which has a distinctive taste.  
For preroast (which I most always do) I will certainly tell you that it is tough to find a roast level that works for them all. The malabar needs a darker roast, but the yirg is ruined with that level. So-play around-explore and enjoy. 
Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile

36) From: Allon Stern
On Sep 24, 2009, at 11:21 PM, decrisce.md wrote:
<Snip>
I agree with all three points :)
I typically roast a batch, then towards the end of that batch, roast  
another batch. If the first batch was really good, especially aged  
well, then I will blend in the grinder 50-50 or 1/3-2/3. Sometimes its  
a real amazing match, like the tail end of a crazy fruited light  
Oriente and the start of a smooth brazil. That's what I'm doing this  
morning :D
-
allon
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest