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Topic: tiny drum (5 msgs / 137 lines)
1) From: AlChemist John
You know, sometimes I hate that other people can just whip out a project 
like that.  OTOH, it is such nice work I can't dislike the person 
:-)  Quick question oh finisher of projects;  with the metal working you 
have done, what gauge thickness would you recommend for aluminum and mild 
steel sheet metal that is "easy" to work for bending by hand and a straight 
edge, but sturdy enough to handle working with.  Some really light gauges I 
found just distort too bad (tin can weigh for instance).
Sometime around 22:37 11/29/2003, Ed Needham typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/

2) From: Ed Needham
You made my day calling me a 'finisher of projects' .
In my experience, the break point for metals is what I can easily cut.  I
have an air shear, but it won't cut even the thinnest stainless I typically
use (22ga.)  It cut galvanized like butter at a thicker gauge.  I use
compound tin snips a lot for cuts in 22 gauge stainless.  Very hard to cut,
but at least I can do it.  I'd love to get a benchtop shear with some heft to
it so I could cut small pieces of thin gauge stainless, but those run near or
over $400 at Harbor Freight, which is about the lowest quality I could
tolerate.
Your question...hmmm.  Aluminum is so easy to cut and work with, but it's
corrosive qualities and brittle characteristics make me shy away from it most
of the time.  Even 1/8" thick aluminum can be easily bent with a vice and a
hammer, and that would be plenty thick enough for most roaster type projects
(stirring vanes, etc...).  Something in the range of 20ga. steel is fairly
workable and easy to cut.  An 1/8" angle can be cut with a hacksaw and bent
with some effort.  Steel the thickness of say an aluminum gutter will hold
it's shape and can be worked fairly easily.  I think that's probably 22
gauge.  My calipers and gauge book are out in the garage, but most of the
gauge/thickness stuff can be found on the web.http://www.speedtoys.com/~qxm/gaugethick.html***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

3) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 08:41 11/30/2003, Ed Needham typed:
<Snip>
I'm glad.
<Snip>
Thanks.  I though gauge was constant.  What is with it changing with the 
material.  Is it not a actually thickness measurement but some other 
testable characteristic that is simply easier to measure by thickness?
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/

4) From: Ed Needham
I have absolutely no idea why gauge is different between dissimilar metals.
Maybe it's like a 2x4, which is not 2" x 4" but rather 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 'after'
it is dried and milled.
I also have absolutely no doubt that deward knows. 
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

5) From: Dan Bollinger
Gauge (or gage) comes to us from the medieval trade guilds. And, since every
material or process had its own guild, they used different standards. It is a
comparative measurement of thickness, not an absolute one. The most standardized
is the AWG wire gauge and the Mfgrs' Standard Gage for Sheet Steel.  Galvanized
sheet is always a tad thicker than plain steel since the zinc coating adds
thickness.  If you need the exact thickness check with the Machinery's Handbook
or just drop me a line and I'll look it up.  Dan
<Snip>http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html<Snip>


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