HomeRoast Digest


Topic: This is got some potentail (22 msgs / 354 lines)
1) From: Ben Treichel
I couldn't resist this Betty Crocker rotisserie. 1250 watts, $60.
Brought it home it ranges from low to high. So I put a temperature probe 
in her, and turn her on high.  I figured it was hot enough when it hit 
550F and was still climbing. It had slowed down some., and it was sure 
heating up the room, but.... a tweak here, a tweak there, here tweak, 
there a tweak .....
Gee I'm starting to feel like i'm on the farm with Gin, trying not to 
step in you know what!!http://makeashorterlink.com/?D22912BD6

2) From: Ben Gold
home depot says no longer available but I found another interesting air driven device that may be of interesthttp://www.everythinghome.com/susosutuov.htmlwe'll see
Ben
Ben Treichel  wrote:
I couldn't resist this Betty Crocker rotisserie. 1250 watts, $60.
Brought it home it ranges from low to high. So I put a temperature probe 
in her, and turn her on high. I figured it was hot enough when it hit 
550F and was still climbing. It had slowed down some., and it was sure 
heating up the room, but.... a tweak here, a tweak there, here tweak, 
there a tweak .....
Gee I'm starting to feel like i'm on the farm with Gin, trying not to 
step in you know what!!http://makeashorterlink.com/?D22912BD6

3) From: Ben Treichel
gin wrote:
<Snip>
It comes with a flat basket with a lid. I'm thinking about screening in 
the basket. I want to try this because I was thinking about bean 
movement in a container of that shape before I decided to buy it. Looks 
like the basket is good for 1 & 1/2 lbs; conservatively.
<Snip>

4) From: Ben Treichel
when i get somewhere with it.
gin wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: peter zulkowski
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
That looks like a recirculater also.. you would have flaming chaff to 
deal with ;)
PeterZ
Ben Gold wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: peter zulkowski
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Now is when one of Ron's drums would come in handy... no more gas grill, 
back to barbecue :)
PeterZ
gin wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: peter zulkowski
Sorry, missed the part that it comes with a flat basket and a lid. There 
is someone on ebay making a similar oven into a coffee roaster with a 
drum addition. It still bothers me about where the chaff goes though.
PeterZ, Still learning to read the WHOLE statement. Here in LHC, AZ
Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Ben Treichel
It still is in the stores. YMMV
Ben Gold wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
Try measuring the temperature after the element cycles off. There is a huge
amount of infra-red radiation from the element that may cause the probe to
read too high. Similar rotisseries are made to operate at 375F, but some
tweaking should solve that problem. Beware of plastic parts.
--

10) From: Ben Treichel
Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>
Didn't notice much change. The probe was near the top of the oven so it 
could be reading hot. It states it was made to operate at ~ 450. I think 
that Detrich features their I/R capabilities in their ads. However 1250 
watts should be enough to be multiple pounds. Thought I was going to 
have to remove the thermostat first thing, now I'm just going to get a 
basket rigged and try her.
<Snip>
 Beware of plastic parts.
Was worried myself, but they stayed cool. This thing does have a metal
'hot top'. Maybe I should just call her the Hot Mama Roaster. :-D 
Some days I wished Tom sold disgusto in bag lots. I hate putting lbs of good beans at risk. Just doesn't seem right.

11) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
good beans at risk. Just doesn't seem right.
Hear, hear!  And it goes double for those of us taking our very first baby
steps in roasting.  I foolishly only ordered a pound of Sweet Maria's Liquid
Amber Espresso Blend and haven't been able to bring myself to try an actual
roast yet.  I've been running temperature curves with the Melitta using
crummy light-roasted beans from the Super Mercado.
Better yet, might there be an inexpensive and "forgiving" bean for beginners
to practice on?  Having already given up on roasting once because of poor
results, and with that all-American "just buy more expensive equipment"
solution unavailable to me, it would be helpful to have some beans that I
don't feel are a terrible waste if I ruin, and are also fairly easy to get a
good result with.
I have to say, had I not discovered this list (via the Sweet Maria's
website) I would most likely have never tried roasting again...so thanks to
you all for your help and the excellent information that circulates like the
smell of fresh-roasted coffee here.  Best Holiday wishes to you all!
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve in Houston

12) From: Ben Treichel
Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>
The aroma roast has a rep as being a tuff piece of equipment to use. A 
thrift shop popper works good as a first try.
<Snip>
I'm guessing that a south american would fit the bill.
<Snip>

13) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Dec 20, 2003, at 10:21 AM, Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Gene,
  I think your problem is that you are feeling "bean poor".   But, if 
you don't use good beans you are not going to get good coffee.  Think 
of what you have to do to reward your roasting behavior.  Also the cost 
of Tom's beans are quite reasonable when you think of what a char$ 
coffee costs.  If you roast 1/3 a pound at a time, for $2.00 a try and 
only one of them turns out good, you are still ahead of char$.  Or take 
for example one of the roasted so called gourmet coffee's like 
Millstone, about $8.00 for an 11oz package.  If you ordered the eight 
pound sampler pack it would give you enough greens to feel you are not 
"bean poor" and you would feel more comfortable roasting away.  We all 
make occasional mistakes but the more you roast, the mistakes become 
fewer and further in between.
Jim Gundlach

14) From: Ed Needham
Great Name.  Wish I had thought of that.

15) From: Ben Treichel
Since she's based off of "Betty Crocker" I think I'm going to keep it.
Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Gene Smith
`> Gene,
<Snip>
Of course, you're right, Jim.  And it's more a case of "bean cheap" than
"bean poor."  But I'm still in the "getting ready to roast" phase, running
temperature curves and seeing how the machine works.  I guess it's a habit
left over from woodworking...you don't run a piece of mahogany through your
saw to see if the settings are right...you use a piece of scrap.  But the
advice is good, and I thank you for it.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve in Houston

17) From: HeatGunRoast
Just a little perspective FWIW.  "Getting ready to roast" is a bit like getting
ready to make love.  You either are or you aren't.  Although the novice may lack
experience, is easily made up for with discovery and enthusiasm. So scrap the scrap,
stick with mahogany, and learn from the best.  
Martin (blushing from all that I've deleted from this post) 
--- Gene Smith  wrote:
 But I'm still in the "getting ready to roast" phase, running
<Snip>http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html=====
Martin
Do you Yahoo!?
Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuardhttp://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree

18) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Gene,  I know what you mean, I'm in manufacturing. If you think you'd need about
110 pounds, Tom might be willing to pick up a full bag of mediocre Grade 2 or 3
for you the next time he's at Royal. Couldn't hurt to ask.  Dan

19) From: Angelo
Ben2,
That particular brand was the turbo in the "TurboCrazy" roaster which was 
spoken of recently...
It does a great job of toasting bagels, btw....
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

20) From: peter zulkowski
Gene I am with you on this.
I started roasting in October 2003. Picked up a Popcorn Pumper in a 
thrift shop for 3.50 and so as not to be too serious: 25 Lbs  of green 
Mexican Altura from ebay for less than 3.00 per lb delivered. My 
learning tools. (Switched to WBPII early on though.)
So far every roast has been excellent, much better than anything 
available in this area, but I am still gun shy about firing up some ISH. 
Even though all the roasts ( about 10 LBS so far) have been fine, they 
have all been different, and of course I like some of the outcome better 
than others. When I feel I have achieved reasonable consistency I will 
be ready to tackle the more expensive stuff..  Well, on second thought, 
I have been roasting some decaf Harrar from SM that everyone loves.. and 
also some Moka Kadir.. Perhaps it is time to just dive in and use some  
of the 'mahogany'  I have been saving..
maybe for Christmas..
PeterZ
Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 07:50 12/20/2003, Ben Treichel typed:
<Snip>
Maybe if enough of use ask he will.  I know I have asked him and with all 
the testing going on, we really could use some calibration beans.   I hated 
looking somewhere else but I am not about to waste good beans.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/

22) From: Ben Treichel
Yep. in fact I'm going to try something.
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest