HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Grinders (180 msgs / 4543 lines)
1) From: John Abbott
LOL   I never even looked inside for that guy!  And all this time Carolyn
has been yelling at ME for the mess!
Thanks Dan - got my morning off on joyful note!
John
--

2) From: tmcvay
Aloha Friends...
	Couldn't resist jumping in at this point in the grinder discussion to
boost the position that (within reason...) avoid saving too much money on a
grinder. Now I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I tried to
order the Solis 166 from Tom just as he stopped shipping them, and as a
fallback, went with the Zass grain mill, and I have got to tell you it
rocked my taste world.  Had been using a Pavoni, a whirley and a couple of
bargain box mills so when all of a sudden I could taste CHOCOLATE! in my
dark roasted Kona (i know, I know..), I may not have been in heaven, but I
could see it from there. Sure my arm complains as the grain mill is manual,
but I gotta repeat, good grindin' is important!  
	OBTW, been here a while, enjoying everyone else's Mana'o, so by way of
introduction, in the old style..
Name: Terry McVay
From: Captain Cook, Hawaii
Occ.: IBM Mechanic (25 yrs.)
Roast usually dark in either a HWP or a Popcorn Pumper
Brew: French press
Hope Maria is feeling better, 
Terry
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3) From: Scott Warner
How many of you here have two grinders - one for espresso and one for 
all other?
The reason I ask is that as I dial my Saeco 2002 from 1.5 for espresso 
to 6 for drip and 13 for vac brewing and then back again I'm not getting 
quite the same grind each time at the lower setting.
The mid and high setting seem OK because I think that the brewing 
process is a little more forgiving but the espresso setting usually 
requires adjustment.
Is this a universal problem with trying to be a one grinder household?
-- 
Scott Warner
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4) From: Isabel1130
Espresso always requires fine adjustments.  I have not had that problem with 
my Mazzer Mini but I would guess the tolerence of many burr grinders is such 
that it will not be quite the same if the grind is changed significantly.  On 
many griders wear will also cause the grind to become erratic.  Yea, I guess 
you could get two if you find yourself adjusting a lot and not happy with 
your espresso.  Or you could buy one pretty expensive one like the Mini and 
probably solve the problem that way also.  Isabel
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5) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
I use Solis grinder but when I shift downward to finer side, I do in
this order.
1. give a half second empty operation.
2. set the dial to 1.5. perhaps another half sec of empty operation.
3. put the bean for espresso.
4. grind
When I move upward, whatever order seems to work just fine
(as long as I put the bean before grinding).
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
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6) From: Al Raden
I use a Solis 166 that I have dialed in for espresso.  Only make minor 
adjustments to the grind.  I originally tried using it for everything, 
and found the same problem you mention - inconsistency after major 
adjustments.
I use a Zass for French Press and Vacuum.  This has the added advantage 
of building up my pecs.
- al r.
Scott Warner wrote:
<Snip>
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7) From: floyd burton
Got 5
antique 175# Elgin National with dual 28" drive wheels
el cheapo whirly blade-useless
Bunn home grinder
2 ea Bunn G3 commercial grinders
All of the above except the el cheapo are adjustable.  The Elgin takes a bit
of effort.  The home model BCG Bunn is fairly easy and fast.  You can also
mark the grind spot on the white dial face.  The Bunn commercial are a
snap-just make a mark with a magic marker on the dial face and there you
have it.  The Bunn's remain spot after adjustment.  You might consider
running the grinder empty to seat the burrs at the lower setting. It should
not change-can grounds build up in the adjustment mechanism?

8) From: Gary Zimmerman
Scott Warner wrote:
<Snip>
Dunno.  I have two grinders, and use one set pretty fine to grind for my 
Melitta filter drip most days, and the other to grind coarser for vacuum 
and press and gold-filter coffee, when I make them.
I decided to use the two because I didn't like keeping track of (and 
basically always forgetting) the grinder adjustments I made for each.  I 
doubt there was a degradation in the grinders, just my memory for setting 
them.  It's very convenient to simply switch grinders, without needing to 
fiddle with the adjustments when I want to brew a different style.  (I 
basically use the same setting for vacuum and gold-filter and press.)
If I was making an even more "grind-critical" coffee like espresso 
frequently, I'd definitely have a (better quality) grinder specifically for it.
-- garyZ
Whirley-drip(paper)-black
         etc...
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9) From: Acorn54
i use two grinders. one for espresso is a zassenhaus model 156.
for my kitchen aid ultra auto drip i use a solis 177
defintely much more convenient using two separate grinders as i don't want to 
keep track of what my grinders are set for (auto drip or espresso). espresso 
requires a very exact grinder setting and i prefer to use a grinder 
exclusively for espresso purposes.-guy from long  island
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10) From: Paul Goelz
At 08:36 AM 1/10/02 -0800, you wrote:
<Snip>
Since we drink more coffee than I drink espresso, I ended up using the same
bean and grinder for both.  I use the Solis/Starbucks 166, set at the
finest setting.  Makes great drip coffee, and the espresso is also quite
good if I take the time to let the espresso maker heat up fully.  
I used to have a separate grinder and roast for espresso, but would always
have beans left over that were way past prime.  This way, the beans are
always fresh since we go through a 1/2 pound Alp roast in about 6 days.  
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
pgoelz at eaglequest dot com
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11) From: bart frazee
Scott:
I'm not familiar with that grinder, but if the setting involves any
mechanical linkage (levers, gears, etc.) there will be some slop in the
system. When changing the setting from low to high the result will be
different than changing from high to low. When changing from a high
setting to a lower setting, go past the setting you want and come back
up to it. That should help with consistency.
Bart
Paul Goelz wrote:
<Snip>
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12) From: Jerry Green
Paul, I too use 2 grinders: a Solis 166 for drip (usually Tom's one-cupper
Swiss gold) and a Gaggia Paros that has its own grinder.  In the latter, I put
only enough beans in the hopper to dispense the amount of ground coffee I'm
using to make the batch of espresso I'm going to serve.  That way, no problem
with staleness.  -- Jerry
Paul Goelz wrote:
<Snip>
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13) From: Timothy A Reed
On Fri, 11 Jan 2002 03:30:57 EST Acorn54 writes:
<Snip>
Hey Guy, you have a Gusto for espresso, right?  I find that the Solis 177
works well enough with it (though I also would like a 2 grinder setup,
but I lack $$$).  Is there a particular reason you're using the Solis for
drip and the Zass for espresso?
-Tim
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14) From: Steven Dover

15) From: Acorn54
hi tim nice to hear from you
i  found the ideal setting on the zassenhaus for my krups gusto and felt i 
should leave well enough alone. besides i only have one double on the gusto 
whereas with the kitchen aid ultra auto drip i drink alot of coffee so it 
makes more sense to use the solis 177 for auto drip.-guy from long island
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16) From: Steve
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I used a whirly grinder for years thinking grinders were grinders. Then =
I bought the Solis 177. What a huge difference. But it was messy, loud, =
and finally broke. So I upgraded to the Maestro. Now that is one great =
grinder. Quiet, clean, easy to use and a lot easier to adjust. Does =
grinding make a difference? I first tried the finest setting for my drip =
brew and found it too harsh. So I turned it up a few notches and from =
the same batch of roast it made an incredible difference, just the way I =
like it. 
steve

17) From: Les and Becky
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I agree with Mark about the Grinder.  I just bought a Solis Maestro, and =
I wished I had done it sooner.  For those on  a tight budget, I would =
recommend getting a $5.00 used air popper and spend the rest on a good =
burr grinder.  I did it the other way around.  I spent the $150 on a HPW =
first.  I now only use the HPW when it is too cold to roast outside with =
my Poppery.  The Poppery does a better job and more volume to boot!  A =
good even grind is the beginning of a good brew no matter the method.
Les

18) From: Mike McGinness
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Les,
Actually by not getting your Solis sooner it turned out for the better. =
If you got a Solis grinder earlier it might have been the far inferior =
Solis 177 Mulino. Once I got the Maestro I can't even use my Mulino for =
travel. It's collecting dust in the garage. Well, not collecting dust =
it's in the Maestro box... The Maestro is just too much better to mess =
with the Mulino even for occasional use. All future travels the Maestro =
will come with!
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA

19) From: Penelope
Sometime around 23:11 1/26/02 -0800, Steve typed: 
<Snip>
bought the Solis 177. What a >huge difference. But it was  messy, loud, and
finally broke. So I upgraded to the Maestro. Now that is >one  great
grinder. Quiet, clean, easy to use and a lot easier to adjust. Does
grinding make a >difference? I first tried the finest setting for my drip
brew  and found it too harsh. So I turned it up a >few notches and from the
same batch  of roast it made an incredible difference, just the way I like
it.  >steve  
I've been trying to puzzle out the amounts of  coffee people here use.  It
seems the "standard" is 2 heaping tablespoons per cup (is this a 6 oz cup?,
why can't a cup be a cup, sigh).  I have tried this and found it likewise
harsh and unpalatable.  I do grind quite fine (with a whirly grinder). To
use 2 tablespoons, does it need to be much coarser?   Mind you, I do like
it the way it presently tastes, but if it could taste even better ...
John
Alchemist at large
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20) From: Spencer W. Thomas
The standard that I use is 7 grams (1/4 oz) per 4 oz cup (about 5oz of 
water going in).  At least, that's what I use.   I think I got this 
quantity from Corby Kummer's "The Joy of Coffee".  If I don't have a 
scale, then it's two *level* tablespoons per 4 oz cup. A "heaping" 
tablespoon is such an imprecise measurement that I shudder to think of 
expressing any sort of quantity in that unit. :-)
The SCAA specifies 3.25 to 4.25 ounces (weight) of coffee per 64 ounces 
(volume) of water.  4 oz / 64 fl oz is the same as the 1/4oz / 4 floz 
that I use. (See http://www.scaa.com/standards_certifications.cfm?sc2=standards_certifications/golden_cup.cfm&NS=1,
for example.)
=Spencer
Penelope wrote:
<Snip>
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21) From: Steve
John,
I tried the 2 tb per cup method but ended up filling the cone to the top! I
never did figure out what that meant exactly, 2 tb per 6 or 8 oz of water?
Seemed like an awful lot of coffee to me.
Over the years of my coffee drinking I found what worked for me which
happens to be 1/2 measuring cup of whole beans. That's 7 or 8 on my Braun
drip brewer or a full pot in my 1 quart Cona vac. That's been my base
amount. From there it's whether I want to brew more or less. I grind
slightly finer for my drip than I do for the vac but still get great flavor
from both.
Most people think my coffee is very dark so I guess my method works...
steve
<Snip>
cup?,
<Snip>
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22) From:
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's really good, though... ;O)
For a single cup in my small French Press, I run about 14g of whole bean (4
level teaspoons, or so) through my (admittedly mediocre) grinder, dump it in
the press, pour about 10oz. of water over it (up to just under the pour
spout), and decante the brew until I don't want any more sludge (usually I
pour it all, even with sludge).  This makes a great 9oz. or so of coffee,
with a little something to chew at the end.  A good grinder would give me
less to chew... but then again, I'll eat chocolate-covered espresso beans,
so it's not a big deal for me.  Very dark, very strong coffee (totally
opaque in the French Press).

23) From: Steve Shank
Use that as a start, try more, try less, find out what YOU like.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
<Snip>
 cup?,
<Snip>
Steve Shank
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24) From: Steve Shank
This makes my EXPERIMENT point exactly. Doing the same as this person I=
 would use about 10-11 grams, and have a friend who is a coffee gourmet who=
 would use only about 9 grams. We also would probably differ in exactly how=
 long we allowed the extraction to continue to get exactly the cup we want.=
 The point is, no one can tell you how you would like your coffee best.=
 Experiment.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
On 01/29/2002 at 11:58 AM tarnim wrote:
It's really good, though... ;O)
 
For a single cup in my small French Press, I run about 14g of whole bean (4=
 level teaspoons, or so) through my (admittedly mediocre) grinder, dump it=
 in the press, pour about 10oz. of water over it (up to just under the pour=
 spout), and decante the brew until I don't want any more sludge (usually I=
 pour it all, even with sludge).  This makes a great 9oz. or so of coffee,=
 with a little something to chew at the end.  A good grinder would give me=
 less to chew... but then again, I'll eat chocolate-covered espresso beans,=
 so it's not a big deal for me.  Very dark, very strong coffee (totally=
 opaque in the French Press).
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://www.steveshank.com

25) From: jim.holmes
<Snip>
When I was first getting more serious about coffee, I was having bad results
with my whirly grinder too. I dropped the $$ for a burr grinder (the thankfully
discontinued Solis 177) and saw immediate, drastic improvements. Whirly grinders
shatter beans, heat up the beans through friction and just don't do a consistent
job of grinding.
Although I hate much about my Solis 177, I'm very pleased with the coffee it
produces.
Jim
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26) From: coffenut
It's been my experience that correct coffee strength is really one of those
"personal preference" things.  I've tried the standard intergalactic ratios
as well and found the resulting cup to be too strong for my liking.  My
family's favorite ratio is 42oz water (the 8 cup level on my drip machine)
to 46grams coffee.  Of course, measuring coffee by weight can be a little
deceiving depending upon the bean and how dark it is roasted.  For instance,
with some of the Ethiopian beans that are fairly strong flavored and/or
darker roasted, I'll cut that 46 grams back to 44g.  On the flip side, with
some Mexicans that are very mild flavored, I may push the weight up to 48
grams to get a little stronger cup.
Coffenut  :^)

27) From: floyd burton
I know it varies but my vac pot and drip both take about 48 oz and I
typically use a heaping 1/2 cup of beans-what volume is the approximate
volume of 44g of coffee beans.  Too cheap to buy scales.
Yeah totally agree on grinders-started out with a blade jobby-lasted one
week-grind ranged from dust to boulders.  went to consumer Bunn-very
consistent size grounds but loud and slow.  Now have a Bunn G3 and it is
quiet and grinds a 1/2 cup+ in a few seconds.
thanks

28) From: Farris, Rick
One-half cup is about three ounces, about 100 grams.  It depends on the
bean, though.  That's before roasting.  After roasting, depending on the
bean, the original 1/2 cup will be somewhere in the 2.4 to 2.6 ounce range.
(It'll also be more than 1/2 cup, but you weren't real specific about what
point in the process to make the measurement.)
Personally, I always roast 3.0 ounces, and if I'm making 56 ounces of drip
coffee (KitchenAid Ultra 12c) I use all of it, and if I'm making 22 ounces
(KitchenAid Compact 4c) I use half of it.
-- Rick

29) From: floyd burton
I measure after roasting and a heaping 1/2 cup of roasted beans must be
plenty for a 48 oz vac pot.
thanks

30) From: Lee B.
I already have a burr grinder, but coffee isn't impressing me the way it
used to... not sure why.. anyway...
I've been using a Saeco 2002 burr grinder for the past several years, about
twice a week. I'm not sure how long these things last... Do you think buying
a Maestro would make a significant improvement that I could taste? I use a
Hario vac pot. Thanks!
Lee B.
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31) From: Randy Mullin

I just got started roasting my own coffee beans and currently use a whirley blade grinder.  I've read many emails emphasizing how beneficial a good grinder is.  I am considering buying a used Zassenhaus hand-cranked grinder on eBay.  Does anyone have any experience with one of these grinders?  How does the grind consistency compare to other such as Solis 166, 177, or Maestro?


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32) From: Al Raden
I have 2 grinders.  My Solis 166 is used strictly for espresso; my 
Zassenhaus is used for vacuum pot and french press.  I think you'll find 
the Zass to be an excellent choice, as long as you're willing to do the 
work of grinding.  I've found the grind to be consistent for the purpose 
I use it for.
- al r.
Randy Mullin wrote:
<Snip>

33) From: Simpson
I know its been said, many times, many ways, but please turn off HTML in
your mail client. In today's virus-ridden environment to use outlook is
just asking for it and to open non-text attachments (which is how a 'pure'
HTML document shows up in my mail) is just silly. I don't do it, so I miss
the pleasure of your writing. I'd rather read what you have to say.
Please?
Ted
ps; Oh, yeah, Grinders are good. Get a grinder. Just lose the HTML.
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34) From: Steve
Yes, this has come up many times but it's really hard to keep making
adjustments for the few who are still behind. Some of us use different
computers or have the need to install/update software, our settings can
change when we are not aware of it. It would be one thing if we were using
non-standard software but most of us aren't.
But then again, why should we have to? I hate to sound rude but this is the
21st century. Viruses are not limited to email. And there are many ways to
fix these problems yourself. You could use a browser based email like
hotmail or yahoo. And get a virus checker and keep it on.
Sorry, but it works both ways. Many years ago a lot of us thought WordStar
was king and wouldn't die, but it did.
steve

35) From: Steve Shank
I'd suggest you update your email program. I also agree with you that you=
 should not update to outlook because of the virus problem, but there is no=
 reason for any modern email program to falsely indicate that an html=
 message is an attachment. To tell the rest of the world that they can't=
 use color or different fonts or bold or underline is hopeless. Give it up.=
 That battle is lost. You have to adapt because as a point of fact, more=
 and more email will not be simple text.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 01/30/2002 at 12:48 AM Simpson wrote:
<Snip>
Steve Shank
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36) From: Rev Mark Gilstrap
Get Eudora for free at qualcomm.com (spelling?).  I have been using Eudora 
for a very long time.  It is as good or better (if you buy the full 
version) than anything else out there, and does *NOT* suffer from the open 
wounds by which infection enters into MicroSoft's 
Outlook  ("LookOut").  Even without a virus protection program, Eudora  can 
protect you as long as you don't open attachments from people you don't 
know.   I made the mistake of letting my son enable Outlook on my new 
computer.  It wasn't but a couple of weeks before I was infected by a 
worm.   I cleaned up and downloaded Eudora and now all is fine.  The latest 
"My Party" worm attachment (which made it past Norton somehow without 
warning me) shows up as harmless ASCII characters in Eudora.    MicroSoft 
should be ashamed.  My old computer ran Linux - never a problem with these 
viruses targeted at unsuspecting MS users.
At 11:06 PM 1/29/02 -0800, you wrote:
<Snip>
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37) From:
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Exactly!

38) From: Dave Huddle
I ABSOLUTELY agree with Ted!
My employer supplied mail system DOES NOT show HTML stuff.
Dave
<Snip>
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39) From: John Blumel
On 1/30/02 12:11 AM, Steve wrote:
<Snip>
I'm afraid you've come across, at least, as a bit naive. Common courtesy 
and long established Internet etiquette both suggest that, when posting 
to mailing lists or newsgroups, one should not use html in one's 
messages. There are a number of reasons for this including,
a) many email clients do not support html mail,
b) many people turn off html mail in clients that do support it,
c) html mail is a frequent carrier of worms,
d) even the best anti-virus software often does not protect you from the 
latest html based email threats,
e) html email is problematic for many message archiving systems,
f) html email may be problematic for text readers used by the visually 
impaired,
g) the eye candy you so carefully crafted may be unreadable on the 
receiving end if the reader is color blind and you have carelessly chosen 
your background and text colors or if the receivers setting for 
displaying html are significantly different than yours.
Common courtesy and common sense would suggest that, rather than 
declaring that one will shove html email into other people's in boxes 
whether they like it or not so they better get used to it, one should 
send html email only when it is known that the receiver(s) want to 
receive it. The same also suggest that anyone naively using html email 
inappropriately should be gently encouraged (as was done by Mr. Simpson) 
to turn it off and assisted in doing so upon request.
On 1/30/02 12:35 AM, Mike McGinness wrote:
<Snip>
Having, "up to date anti-virus software running in Auto-Protect," is not 
really practising safe computing. I'm not aware of any anti-virus 
software that usually is able to stop the latest email worms without 
patches applied. If you are lucky enough to get the patch before you get 
hit you'll be ok, otherwise, you take your chances. Depending solely on a 
single line of defense against virus, worm and trojan threats is often a 
guarantee of vulnerability.
On 1/30/02 1:06 AM, Steve Shank wrote:
<Snip>
Actually, there is a very good reason for any modern or ancient email 
program to indicate that an html message is an attachment. HTML messages 
are sent as email attachments.
On 1/30/02 7:57 AM, Dave Huddle wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks Dave for saying in one line what took me paragraphs.
John Blumel
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40) From: Penelope
Thank you for the exact numbers.  That helps a lot.  As it turns out what I
have been using for a while is the 1/2 c of beans for 42 oz water, so I'm
not that far out.  I know it doesn't matter per se as so long as I like the
final product, but I just like to "know" the standard.  Wasn't someone (I
can't find the post now) discussing using 2lbs of coffee for 1 gallon (128
oz) of water or were they making significately more coffee?
John 
Alchemist at large
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41) From:
That might have been me.  I was trying to estimate how much coffee you could
make with a pound of grean bean coffee.  My calculations started with the
"high end" of 7g ground coffee per 5 oz. of water (or what American drip
coffee makers call "1 coffee cup").  It actually works out closer to 1.73
gallons per pound, with the original numbers I used.  You could easily get 2
gallons.
Here's my original numbers:
 1.  1 oz. (weight) = 28.35 grams
 2.  7 grams ground coffee per 5 oz. (volume) water
 3.  1 lb. green bean coffee = about 14 oz. (weight) roasted coffee
 - so, 14 oz. (weight) roasted coffee produces 396.9 grams, divided by 7
grams = 56.7, times 5 oz. (volume) = 283.5 oz. (volume), divided by 164 oz.
(volume, 1 gallon) = 1.73 gallons.
See, science really WAS important in school.  All for the love of coffee!
Tod

42) From: Acorn54
 i use the zassenhaus model 156 knee mill for my krups gusto 
i use the solis 177 for my drip (kitchen aid ultra 4 cup)
the zass works just fine for espresso and you don't need to go close to the 
finest grind with it to pull 25 second shots (with  my gusto at  least) 
the solis 177 i got on sale when the maestro came out. great machine and 
makes a world of difference in the taste of the coffee-quality grinders do 
matter.
as for amount of coffee per cup  i use 6 ounces of water to  two tablespoons 
of coffee. i think this is the widely held ratio in all those coffee books. 
it tastes fine to me.-guy from long island
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43) From: Ted Kostek
I've been looking at the Zass grinders on Tom's page, and I have some
questions.  I'm willing to search the archive for answers, but only if some
one can give me a lead on where to look.  There's way to much to try sifting
through everything there.
He has the caveat that hand grinding is not for everyone. Just how onerous
are these things to use?  How much more convenient are the "knee grinders"
than the counter-top models?
Tom says the capapcity is enough coffee for 6 cups, but we run into the
typical ambiguity of "what's a cup?"  Since I got my french press, I've been
making about 20 oz of coffee and using the ratio of  2 tbl coffee/4 oz
water, hence requiring about 10 tbl of grounds.  I assume it'll handle that
much at a go, right?
tmk
--
Ted Kostek
765 494 2146 (desk)
765 494 1489 (engine room)
765 494 0787 (fax)
"Always keep in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important
than any other thing."  Abraham Lincoln
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44) From: Dan Bollinger
That's stronger than normal coffee!  I use 1T/8oz. or 3T per french press.
I have the Zass knee grinder. Very well made.  I think the Zassenhaus are
the best manual burr grinders in the world, new or vintage. All of the
conical burr grinders suffer from the same ailment, they jerk along as you
grind.  It isn't very convenient to put the grinder between your legs and
grind, but it does help a bit.  I usually hold it against my belly long-wise
and crank.   My knee Zass will grind 9.8 tablespoons if the little drawer is
filled to the brim. Of course a wall grinder eliminates the jerking and
that's their primary contribution. I intend to get a Zass wall grinder in a
month.  Dan
<Snip>
some
<Snip>
sifting
<Snip>
been
<Snip>
that
<Snip>
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45) From: Ted Kostek
Dan said:
<Snip>
Hmm.  I'll have to check on that ratio.  My Bodum press came with a little
scoop.  I use one scoop per 4 oz water, which is what the instructions
indicated.  Based on the instructions, Bodum recommends 7.25g/4 oz water,
which is what SweetMaria's recommends on their web page.  I thought the
scoop was 2tbl, but maybe I'm wrong.
Obviously, the most important factor is your personal preference.  So far
I'm pretty happy with whatever ratio I'm using, and I assume you are happy
with your strength as well.
tmk
--
Ted Kostek
765 494 2146 (desk)
765 494 1489 (engine room)
765 494 0787 (fax)
"Always keep in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important
than any other thing."  Abraham Lincoln
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46) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
I'll switch to weight instead of volume like you did, its more appropriate.
Bodum's ratio works out to 36g/20oz. or 43.5g/24oz.  My Bodum will hold
22-24oz when filled to the top of the metal bar.  I use 40g for these
22-24oz.  That's right inline with what Bodum says for 'regular strength'
coffee.   Dan
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47) From: Kevin DuPre
I have had a Braun burr grinder that I used for almost
2 years before buying a DeLonghi from Costco for about
24.99.
The Braun requires frequent cleaning because due to
its design the throat gets clogged, moreso depending
on how 'oily' the roast is.
Recently we switched to the DeLonghi and I have been
amazed at two things - 1) the grinder is fast as hell!
2) the timer and the calibration on the grinds
receptacle seem to not only agree but match up with my
$10 2-tbsp Starbucks coffee measure.  As I've posted
in the past (thread: Re: manual drip brewers), I know
ahead of time just how much coffee I'll need for my
manual drip. I dispense that much whole bean into the
input hopper, turn the timer to the required amount
and the rest is history. Even when the Braun was new,
I don't remember it ever grinding this fast.
All burr grinders except the very expensive commercial
ones that sell for $600-800 exhibit some form of
"static cling" the Braun moreso than the DeLonghi, but
a few taps with the rubber covered end of my scoop and
they all settle down in the grinds receptacle.  With
the DeLonghi, I simply take my pre-measured amount and
pour it into my filter cone.
The only grip with the DeLonghi is that the spacing
between the burrs at the finest setting is still too
coarse for espresso. The top burr is removable however
with 3 small phillips screws. I simply stuck the top
burr to 2 layers of clear packing tape, and trimmed
the excess so it acted like a shim and replaced the
burr.  You want to be careful when doing this so you
don't shim too much.
The DeLonghi is head and shoulders above the Braun
however - they both retail for about the same price,
although Costco sells the DeLonghi for about $24.99
which is about half of retail list.
Model number of the DeLonghi is DCG-4t
=====
--
Kevin DuPre
obxwindsurfhttp://profiles.yahoo.com/obxwindsurf"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes -- Marcel Proust"
Do You Yahoo!?
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48) From: The Scarlet Wombat
Even the commercial grinders have ground coffee scattering syndrome, (GCSS).
I have a Mazzer Super Jolly and, while it has no static cling as there is 
no plastic, there is this happy little gremlin that lives inside and no 
matter how careful I am about cleaning up and not spilling grounds, he 
makes sure there is always a patena of ground coffee in a swath about the 
machine's bottom.  It makes him happy and so, who am I to deprive the 
little fellow of his happiness.
He scatters, I clean, he scatters, I clean, keeps both of us off the streets...
Dan
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49) From: floyd burton
Don't know if this is correct or not but the slower and smaller the grinders
would seem to be the candidates for producing more heat in the grounds-if
they go through quickly-heat should not be an issue.  Started off with a
whirly blade-that lasted for a week-awful boulders and dust-a PP machine.
Then got a consumer Bunn-good grounds consistency but slow as hell and the
noise was awful-then got a commercial Bunn G3 and this puppy is fast and
fairly quiet.  Has a little thumper built in to shake down the last of the
grounds.  WHile at the Intelligentsia spresso event, saw a couple of Doug's
real commercial grinders-someone told me the same company that provides Bunn
with their commercial burrs makes these things-the grind unit looks exactly
like the Bunn but on the back is a large motor (220 V ?) and maybe 3 HP.
THey use these grinders for their large accounts wanting ground coffee.  If
you think the Bunn G series takes up counter/floor space-check out these
puppies.

50) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
"All burr grinders except the very expensive commercial ones that sell for
$600-800 exhibit some form of "static cling"..."
Kevin, you are right, in fact that ALL grinders exhibit at least a hint of
the "static cling". However, our Solis Maestro our daughters bought from
Sweet Maria's as a gift to us exhibits very small, quite tolerable static
cling.
The ZeroStat gun is an easy way to eliminate the static cling; in fact most
any static problem.
Cheers, Lubos
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51) From: Dan Bollinger
Kevin,  I recall reading that high-speed burr grinders are not suppossed to
make good coffee because the heat from the fast grinding.  Certainly,
delicate volatiles could be lost.  I don't know if this is fact or just
theoretical.  Have you noticed a difference in taste?  How about doing a
side-by-side cupping?  Ideally, you'd have someone move the cups so are
making a blind taste test.  Dan
<Snip>
in having new eyes -- Marcel Proust"
<Snip>
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52) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
grinders
<Snip>
I think the theory goes that it is not the general increase in temperature,
but the localized heat at the cutting edge; increased blade speed means
increased energy imparted. This is a concern in food processing in general,
I've heard.  Nice theory, but I'm still waiting for a cupping to
prove-or-disprove that it is a concern for us. Dan
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53) From: R.N.Kyle
Rich Adams wrote:
Is it my imagination or does the WB take its sweet time to come up to =
temp?
I have steady temperature increase but VERY slow.  Today I saw a box for =
the
WBII and it said "worlds fastest popper" on it.  Speed, perhaps, became =
an
issue after WBs first release of the poppery.  I don't know just =
thinking
out loud.
Rich I usually profile my roast with the heater off mod I did to my WBI  =
but seeing post about WB's taking 8+ min. on their own without a cool =
switch. I thought I'd give it a try. Dumped 138 gram batch in a cold WBI =
plugged it in heater and fan on, 5 1/2 min roaring 2nd crack. dumped the =
roast. into a colander to cool   The greens were Monkey Blend. I did =
another batch back to back  Popper hot rolling 2nd crack 41/2 min. Both =
my WBI and WBII ramp up and finish if left alone in 4.5 to 5.5 min. To =
hot to fast, causing the beans to explode with little shards everywhere, =
slowing the roast down not only gives more body, but the beans stay =
together and look really good.
Ron
Anderson SC
rnkyle

54) From: AlChemist John
I had a friend over yesterday.  I asked if he wanted any coffee and he said 
"no, well, you do homeroasted.  Ok that  sounds good".  Well that made my 
day.  I gave him  a modified WBII for his birth day a few months 
back.  Where he is not completely hooked (they are not roasting right now 
as they do not find it is worth it in the winter), at least he appreciates 
the difference.
Anyway, as I sometimes do when I have the time, I ground my coffee with my 
hand spice burr grinder.  The same kenya karumandi that I had that morning, 
whirly bladed, was suddenly very smooth and pleasant.  Whirlybladed it was 
much to acidic, sharp and winey.  This morning I hand ground for an entire 
pot of Jampit just to compare.  Once again, Wow.
So after a year homeroasting and whirly blading, I am starting to consider 
a Zass hand mill because I can finally tell a difference, even as 
drip.  The mill I have takes over 300 rotations for a full pot and it is 
not that fine a grind.  Even with the taste improvement, I find this a bit 
much.  Do Zass grinders grind more efficient than this?
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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55) From: TFisher511
Yes, they sure do.
Terry F
alchemist writes:
<Snip>

56) From: Rich Adams

57) From: R.N.Kyle
Hey Rich If my WB went  12 min unaltered, I would not have modified it =
at all. I only modified it to get a slower roasting profile. although =
the fan without heat is a nice feature
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

58) From: R.N.Kyle
the WBI is made like a tank, and the craftsmanship is real good. I roast =
anywhere from 140 grs, needs little help with agitation, to 175 grs. =
which needs a little shaking in the beginning. I really like the WB over =
the WBII. 
Alpenrost to arrive Monday. can't wait
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

59) From: Rich Adams

60) From: Tom Gramila
On Fri, 27 Dec 2002, Rich Adams wrote:
<Snip>
   Rich,
	The thing you removed was mica.  It is an insulator whose job, I
believe, is to prevent shorts from the heater coil to the body of the
casing.  It can stand very high temperatures and is a very good electrical
insulator.  If you want to replace it, you can get some from McMaster
carr.  It cuts with scissors.  I would think twice before using reflective
tape, which may not be able to stand the high temperatures....
	It may also provide some thermal isolation between the heaters and 
the case, but I would also expect that to be a small effect, since the 
heated air is in contact with the case just after the heater section.
				Tom G.
	(You are talking about an ogiginal poppery, yes??)
<Snip>
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61) From: Rich Adams
Thanks Tom.
I guess if its job is to prevent shorts it better be a good insulator huh?
I did not even contemplate getting some reflective tape, I just envisioned I
was NOT going to, the unit runs fine without the mica, even the plastic
sides do not get any hotter then when it was installed (as far as I can
tell, only used it twice before deciding the thermostat has to go).  AND I
am getting slow roasts with the mica out (maybe due it being gone I really
don't know).
Thanks again.
Rich
<Snip>
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62) From: Tom Gramila
Please send word along about what adjustmants you make, and how they go.
I have my never-used-for-roasting WB-I apart on the kitchen table as I
write.  -- My modified poppery II died on me on christmas eve, with four
selections of beans waiting to be roasted.  I am moving over thermometers
to the WB I, changing its wiring so the fan can be run alone, etc.  I
wasnt sure of a good way to bypass the thermostat, so I just adjusted it
by one turn.  Boy, this thing is very nicely made.
I'm hoping I can do a lager batch than the 120 grams I ran in the
poppery II.
With fingers crossed....
	Tom
On Fri, 27 Dec 2002, Rich Adams wrote:
<Snip>
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63) From: Steven Van Dyke
How about just trying heavy-duty aluminum foil (shiny side in)?
Enjoy!
Steve :->
http://www.svandyke.com<- my simple home page
http://www.cafeshops.com/stevespics<- my little store of Impressionist &
Special Events Photography stuff)

64) From: jim jordan
Heres the deal.  I am having body parts changed out
and/or repaired at a frightening rate.  So naturally,
I decided the answer to my problems/issues would be a
new coffee grinder.  I used to have a  La padrone or
some such $40 K Mart model and was happy with it. 
Over time I got into making better coffee (any of this
sounding familiar?) and upgrading. Now I got a home
roaster (FR+ .Did ya'll know that the new roaster
chamber on the FR+ is a little larger tban previous
editions and significantly slows down the roast
time?).  I got a *$/Solis for 129$, worked well but
got slower and s l o w e r  a n d  s  l   o... you get
the idea. I talked to Mr *$ fine young men, they told
me to clean it and I did, made no difference still
very slow.  Got so frustrated I bought a cusinart
whirley blade, splits coffee nicely into very large
pieces and dust (actually It was not that bad). 
Because of my association with folks like you, I
became ashamed of having a whirly blade grinder so one
day at Costco I got their 40$ model.  Its ability to
create coffee dust is amazing. So I got 129 + 15 + 42
= 186 dollars tied up and still can't get a decent cup
of coffee.  So I am going to get either the Mazzer
mini or Rocky.  I don't do espresso, mainly drip, some
vacuum and press.  I'm looking at the Rocky doserless.
Is there any reason to believe, from your experience,
that either of these would not work as well on drip as
espresso?  Is there anything else worth considering?
Cheer  
=====
Cheers  Jim Jordan
kcjimj
"We can do it.  We can rebuild him better.  We have the technology.  We can make him faster....stronger.....better!"
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65) From: R.N.Kyle
 So I am going to get either the Mazzer
<Snip>
Jim
 you can't go wrong with either the Mini or the Rocky, although the =
Rocky does offer a doserless version. They both are capable of grinding =
coffee for any brewing method.
Ron 
rnkyle

66) From: paul
On Wed, Apr 09, 2003 at 07:39:27PM -0700, jim jordan wrote:
<Snip>
The only difference is fineness of grind. If the consistency
is bad, you'll have problems with any brewing method. 
<Snip>
You might want to take a look at the Cunill Tranquilio
(often called the Tranquilo on alt.coffee) while you're
comparing grinders.
It's doserless, has a 285 watt moter and 60mm blades. It's
commonly used as a decaf grinder in cafes. ie: it's 
commercial not consumer oriented. I've seen mention on 
alt.coffee that it's available for around $190 US.
Pros: built like a tank. semi-commercial. consistent grind
Cons: built like a tank; even though it's got a flattened
hopper, it's still big. it's got a portafilter holder which
might get in the way for non-espresso use.
I've been using mine every day for 4 months now, and it's
making great espresso. 
Paul Haddon
Sydney, Australia: homeroasting wilderness

67) From: jim gundlach
On Wednesday, April 9, 2003, at 09:39 PM, jim jordan wrote:
<Snip>
The Rocky does everything from Turkish to French Press.
Jim Gundlach

68) From: miKe mcKoffee
From: "jim jordan" 
<Snip>
Somehow that makes perfect sense to me!
  I used to have a  La padrone or
<Snip>
Been there whirly chop,burr Braun (worked for a number of years for drip &
Press until I upscaled my coffee habit), Capresso (king of dust - didn't
last a week), Solis Mulino & Maestro done that-  the burrs wear out fast and
only upper user replaceable on the Solis. Bye-bye one and all :-(
<Snip>
And of course bye-bye $$$ too!
So I am going to get either the Mazzer
<Snip>
Either would be excellent choice me thinks. Since December 02 I use Rocky
for espresso to French Press and every grind inbetween no problems. Very
very pleased so far and would highly recommend. The grind chute hang is
there as I knew it would be, I just use a flux brush to clear it every
grind.
<Snip>
can make him faster....stronger.....better!"
Now *that* is a homeroasters tag line if I ever heard one!!! And appropriate
too. The Six Million Dollar roaster, grinder, brewer, bean stash etc...
MM;-)
FrankenFormer Rosto Roastin' - Royally Balance Brewin'
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin' too!
PNW HomeRoast List Gathering Info' URLhttp://home.attbi.com/~mdmint/coffee/pnwhrg.htm

69) From: Ben Treichel
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
Not quite right. should be
" ....faster....stronger.....better! and computer profiled"
<Snip>

70) From: jim gundlach
On Wednesday, April 9, 2003, at 09:39 PM, jim jordan wrote:
<Snip>
The Rocky does everything from Turkish to French Press.
Jim Gundlach

71) From: Jason & Laura Brooks
Greetings,
    After finding out about a Bodum Antigua locally on sale, I started
researching my upgrade from a whirly blade to a mill.  I can't afford a
Rocky but am looking at a Zass as an alternative.  I don't mind the work of
hand grinding, and actually like the portability of the Turkish/Arbic mills.
my question is this: can a Zass, especially any single model, do a full
range of grinds from flour-like espresso to a coarse press?
Thanks,
Jason Brooks

72) From: Ben Treichel
Yes, but I was using a closed hopper mill, not the turkish. Its the best 
burr grinder avaiable (IMHO) if you want to do espresso along with the 
other grinds for under $200.
Ben
Jason & Laura Brooks wrote:
<Snip>

73) From: miKe mcKoffee

74) From: Zara Haimo
I use one of the knee Zass's for my daily grind (and exercise!), although I
find it more comfortable to hold it in my hands and not between my knees.
Most often, I grind fine for espresso, but I sometimes shift to a coarser
grind for my French press.  It took a little experimenting to find the right
settings (which I marked with an indelible pen) for each kind of grind, but
now it's easy to shift between the two positions.

75) From: Myron Joshua
I Zass daily.
I have tried the regular box mill and the knee version and prefer the
regular box mill. It can also be held between the knees and is stabler than
the knee version, especially when held on the lap or on a counter.
I think the few minutes of exercise and direct contact with the grind is
great-but I have heard of someone who hooked up an electric drill to the
grinder to make it more automatic.
Myron

76) From: James Gundlach
 While the Zass is adjustable getting it to a desired setting is a dial in process and once you re-adjust it to grind at a different setting you have to dial it in again.  It took me a couple of weeks to get mine dialed in for espresso.  Most sucessful users of the Zass dial it in for what they want and use the light duty version of loc-tite to keep the adjusting nut in place.
Jim Gundlach
grinding with a Rocky
and roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
On Wednesday, April 30, 2003, at 06:56PM, Jason & Laura Brooks  wrote:
<Snip>

77) From: AlChemist John
My larger closed hopper Zass can grind about 70g in about 2.5 
minutes.  Espresso grind would of course take longer, but I don't do 
espresso at home.  It can do it though.  I tested it when I first got 
it.  Great hand grinder.  You can actually feel the blades cutting the 
beans, not just crushing them.
Sometime around 20:55 4/30/2003, miKe mcKoffee typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalt

78) From: John Abbott
I a model 169 and began by counting the turns in 1/4 turn segments per a
recommendation from Tom - but then like everyone else - used a dab of
nail polish to mark and hold it. However I never have had the problem
with my setting moving that seems to plague so many.  I don't use my
Zass on a daily basis since we got the SM5K.  It is reserved for Cona
Vac work.
John - enjoying a great Peruvian
  
On Thu, 2003-05-01 at 05:49, James Gundlach wrote:
     While the Zass is adjustable getting it to a desired setting is a dial in process and once you re-adjust it to grind at a different setting you have to dial it in again.  It took me a couple of weeks to get mine dialed in for espresso.  Most sucessful users of the Zass dial it in for what they want and use the light duty version of loc-tite to keep the adjusting nut in place.
    
    Jim Gundlach
    grinding with a Rocky
    and roasting over pecan wood fires
    in La Place, Alabama
    
    On Wednesday, April 30, 2003, at 06:56PM, Jason & Laura Brooks  wrote:
    
    >Greetings,
    >    After finding out about a Bodum Antigua locally on sale, I started
    >researching my upgrade from a whirly blade to a mill.  I can't afford a
    >Rocky but am looking at a Zass as an alternative.  I don't mind the work of
    >hand grinding, and actually like the portability of the Turkish/Arbic mills.
    >my question is this: can a Zass, especially any single model, do a full
    >range of grinds from flour-like espresso to a coarse press?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Jason Brooks
    >
    >
    >
    >homeroast mailing list
    >http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html    >">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast    >To change your personal list settings, seehttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html    >
    >
    

79) From: javafool
I also use a 169 regularly in addition to my Rocky. I just like the way the
169 looks and the feel of the grinder. I followed someone's recommendation
of adding a rubber band to the adjustment shaft to keep it from moving.
Simple, cheap and it has worked very well so far.
TerryF

80) From: Jason & Laura Brooks
Thanks for the info.  Does anyone out there use a Zass Turkish?  have 
any suggestions on this one, especially for an eventual portable 
solution?  I've been looking at spirit lamp/stoves sold at outdoor 
stores to use to heat an Ibrik, or water for a press.  A portable, 
manual grinder would go well with this powerless setup.
Thanks,
Jason
Myron Joshua wrote:
<Snip>

81) From: miKe mcKoffee

82) From: Jason & Laura Brooks
Cool.  That's been my idea.  Although my wife thinks I'm a bit odder 
now.  I guess travelling with a Zass turkish, an ibrik, and a lamp isn't 
for everyone.  And, if we camp more, an old-fashioned pop-corn popper 
would do to roast over a fire.
Jason
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

83) From: jim gundlach
Gilberto,
    I have a 154 but I lust after the 169DG.
         Jim
On Tuesday, June 24, 2003, at 09:34  PM, Gilberto Walker wrote:
<Snip>

84) From: John Abbott
I went with the 169DG based on Tom's recommendation when I was learning
to use (read that prevent stalls) the Cona D.  I have zero complaints
about the grinder.  Even looks nice up on the shelf.
On Tue, 2003-06-24 at 22:50, jim gundlach wrote:
    Gilberto,
        I have a 154 but I lust after the 169DG.
             Jim
    On Tuesday, June 24, 2003, at 09:34  PM, Gilberto Walker wrote:
    
    > Dear Jim,
    >
    > Thanks for your response about the Solis Maestro and the Zass grain 
    > mill.
    > Based on your and Mike's advice, I've ruled out both of those options.
    > Could you please tell me which model of the Zass coffee mills you have 
    > that
    > grinds fine enough for espresso?
    > Thanks again to you and Mike for your help!
    > Gilberto
    > grwcm1
    >
    >
    > homeroast mailing list
    >http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast    > To change your personal list settings, see 
    >http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html    >
    

85) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 20:50 6/24/2003, jim gundlach typed:
<Snip>
I love my 169, although I have to say all of the Zass drawer spaces are a 
bit small.  I keep planning to go out to the shop and make a larger 
permanent drawer assembly that will hold a full pot's worth of coffee.  One 
day....
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/

86) From: rnkyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I remember a long discussion as sometimes happens on this list. The =
subject was burr grinders. The Rocky, Masser,and the Innova.
when I was in Raleigh last week at the SCAA C-members event. Cindy Chang =
from CounterCulture Coffee, gave me some instruction on espresso. There =
was 2 commercial grinders both Massers. One was a flat burr, but the new =
one was a conical burr. It was much quieter, and made a very consistent =
grind. 
I remember back then that the Innova had 2 one flat and one conical.
Zass is conical. I will be getting a new grinder for Christmas and was =
thinking about either of these 3 
low end Solis , Middle rocky or Innova, high end Masser Mini.
I know this is an old question.. but in light of the new masser being a =
conical . I was wondering if any list members have any information on =
the change from flat to conical or have they always offer both.
Ron
rnkylehttp://rnk10.tripod.comRoasting drums for gas grills.

87) From: rnkyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Correction but you all know I can not spell
Masser should be Mazzer
Ron :O(

88) From: gin
Hi,
Are there going to be grinders at the gathering?
Not funny after a 3000 mile ride, John.
Michael

89) From: Lesley Albjerg
My Mazzer Super Jolly will be there!
 
Les
gin  wrote:
Hi,
Are there going to be grinders at the gathering?
Not funny after a 3000 mile ride, John.
Michael---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Friends.  Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger

90) From: Rob Stewart
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I'll have a Faema MPN  grinder there and am bringing a hand lens to =
examine the grinds up close. Inquiring minds......
Rob

91) From: AlChemist John
Yes.  I just updated the site.  Numerous grinders and espresso 
machines.  Did you bring one across country?   Are you a Gin loading up her 
Solis 5K?
Sometime around 08:53 PM 6/14/2004, gin typed:
<Snip>
You mean the joke?  Sorry about that.
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

92) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'd assume anyone bringing their brewing equipment would include their
grinder(s). At least, I'll have my Rocky to use with Miss Silvia and Presses
and whatever other brewing devices I bring... I'll likely also bring Zass
Turk' Mill for those who'd like to check it out as a possible travel
grinder.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

93) From: john kahla
Hi all,
Question now that I know what kind of espresso machine I am going to
try and buy, an Expobar....now need a grinder. Am looking at the Macap
M5, Mini Mazzer, Nuova Simonelli MCF and finally a Nuova Simonelli
MDX.
Comments?
Thanks, John

94) From: Greg Scace
Cimbali Jr. is a better grinder than the others on your list for not much 
more than a mazzer mini.
At 11:15 AM 4/22/2005 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>

95) From: Michael Dhabolt
One nice thing about the Mini is:   you never look back.
On 4/22/05, john kahla  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

96) From: Linda
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Seems the past month just hasn't been the best for me. First the espresso
machine gave up and now it is my grinder. I had the Gaggia MM now I have
none. Would like your opinions on a new grinder in the under $300 price
range. 
Linda in Lakeside 
HYPERLINK mailto:lindafe mailto:lindafe
Roasting in a Cast Iron Skillet
Keep smiling..everyone will wonder what you are up to
A mans got to do what a mans got to do. 
A woman must do what he  can't.
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.8.1/28 - Release Date: 6/24/2005
 

97) From: Eric Stevenson
--Apple-Mail-2-63813032
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	charset-ASCII;
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Rocky.  Terrific grinder and a hair under $300.
Eric
On Jun 29, 2005, at 9:11 PM, Linda wrote:
<Snip>
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Rocky.  Terrific grinder and a =
hair under $300.
Eric
On Jun 29, = 2005, at 9:11 PM, Linda wrote:

Seems the past month just hasn't = been the best for me. First the espresso machine gave up and now it is = my grinder. I had the Gaggia MM now I have none. Would like your = opinions on a new grinder in the under $300 price range. =

Linda in Lakeside = HYPERLINK mailto:lindafe<= U> mailto:lindafe<= /U>

Roasting in a Cast Iron = Skillet

Keep = smiling..everyone will wonder what you are up to

A mans got to do what a mans got to do. = A woman must do what he  = can't.

-- = No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG = Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.8.1/28 - Release = Date: 6/24/2005  

= = --Apple-Mail-2-63813032--

98) From: Erik Gilling
Linda wrote:
<Snip>
I'm *VERY* happy with my Rocky 
http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.electricmills.shtml#RancilioRocky). Go 
with the doserless model.  I just bought a Shop Vac 1x1 which works 
great for cleaning out the "tunnel" and hopper to keep stale grinds out 
of the machine and stores nicely under the counter.
-Erik

99) From: Tara Kollas
I have a Rocky without the doser - not sure if anyone has the
doserless model, but I wonder whether the doser model is easier to
clean.  I have a hand vac that I use after every grind, but the
espresso still gets stuck in the chute.  I love how well it grinds,
but might have gotten the doser model had I known what a PITA it is to
clean.
Tara
On 6/30/05, Linda  wrote:
<Snip>

100) From: Brett Mason
Rocky, with a Zass chaser....  I love both of these!
Brett
On 6/29/05, Linda  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

101) From: Brett Mason
I have the Rocky doserless, and don't vacuum out the chute.  Instead I
usually grind about 1 Tsp of coffe into a cup and toss it.  Then I
proceed with grinding for my espresso shots... No stale coffee here,
and no shop vac in my wife's kitchen....
Regards,
Brett
On 6/30/05, Tara Kollas  wrote:
<Snip>
so
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

102) From: David Johnson
After much searching, I finally got me a Back up Zass off eBay (4390419076
- I got a deal because it was listed as a pepper mill). Why did I need a
back up? Who knows! A tip on eBay Zass hunting - if you put your search
words in parenthesis separated by commas eBay will search for either term.
So my Zass search looks like (zassenhaus, fassenhaus) and I search in the
titles and descriptions. You will get the occasional math text, WWII
history, and pepper grinder, but you will pick up some items that are
mislabeled by the seller.
David
with Rocky, Zass I, Zass II, Armin Trosser, Mr Dudley I, Mr Dudley II, Mr
Dudley III, Turkish grinder 1&II, and Mr John Wright.
<Snip>

103) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
I have heard from more than a few what type of grinder do you use.
I currently have a Cuisinart burr grinder for home.
I need something good for travel any thoughts about a good well priced 
grinder that will serve me well on a 7 month deployment.
Dennis

104) From: Barry Luterman
Electric?

105) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
either one is fine...
one more thing I will be using an Aeropress for most of my coffee with 
the occasional sharing of a drip pot when I am feeling generous to my 
shipmates....
Barry Luterman wrote:
<Snip>

106) From: Barry Luterman
Probably a Zass.Using an Aeropress you won't be grinding large quantities at 
any one time.Also, this way you can have it for blackouts, traveling and 
camping.In the long run you will get a better grind than out of a cheap 
electric grinder.

107) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
Ok any suggestions on where I can find one looks like SM is currently 
all out.......
Barry Luterman wrote:
<Snip>

108) From: Barry Luterman
Try e-bay also look under fassenhaus

109) From: javafool
I don't know anything about Bodum grinders, but down towards the bottom of
the page this looks interesting for $55.http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.sale-items.shtmlTerry

110) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
Thanks! this looks perfect for my needs....anybody have one of these? or 
will I be the list guinea pig?
Dennis
javafool wrote:
<Snip>

111) From: Brett Mason
I have a few - all off eBay - all great - most 18-28 in price...
Brett
  Zassman
On 8/7/06, Dennis & Marjorie True  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

112) From: Jim Mitchell
Hmmm ...
That would be "Small, furry snack-food in Peruvian" - wouldn't it?
Cheers
Jim

113) From: Brian Kamnetz
I saw the Bodum grinder on the SM sale page and was curious. What's
the story on ceramic burrs?
Brian
On 8/7/06, javafool  wrote:
<Snip>

114) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
Ceramic stays sharp longer than steel and usually costs mucho more. For
instance a quality little 3" ceramic paring knife can run $100+!!! (no, I
have no ceramic knives)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

115) From: javafool
I don't know and was really tempted to try one myself. But, I have four =
hand
grinders already so my SM order that shipped from Oakland today did not
include another grinder. Just coffee and Hottop filters.
Terry

116) From: javafool

117) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Well I just placed my order for the grinder, an Aeropress, extra pack of 
filters, 2 pounds of Kenya AA 503(sounded like a pretty decent coffee)  
a monkey tee shirt!
everything I need to just get in trouble.....  I will let all know how 
the grinder works..
thanks again for the tip!
Dennis
I don't know anything about Bodum grinders, but down towards the bottom of
<Snip>

118) From: Michael Rasmussen
As I read on I see that grinders are __very__ important.  gulp.
Do any of you have experience with the Kitchen Aid Pro Line vs. the Solis Maestros?
I don't have an espresso machine.  Coffee brewing is either Chemex or push pot -
though I may dig out the moka pot now that I have better coffee to drink.
Michael 'biggest problem today is choosing which of the eight from the sample pack
to roast (oh poor me)' R
-- 
   Michael Rasmussen, Portland, Ore, USA
  Be Appropriate && Follow Your Curiosity
       http://www.patch.com/words/

119) From: Les
Kitchen Aid Pro is slightly better.  However longivity on both is
poor.  If you never plan on espresso either one will last you about
300 pounds of coffee before you have to replace them.  On the
otherhand a Rocky or Mazzer Mini has easy to replace burrs when the
time for replacement comes.
Les
On 11/24/06, Michael Rasmussen  wrote:
<Snip>

120) From: raymanowen
Michael, I think I can find support in this group for my opinion that the
coffee grinder is not
Very Important, but it's a Primary catalyst that you assume will stimulate
the flavor potential of your coffee beans.
While you're assuming the best from it, your grinder can stick a blade
between your ribs and obliterate your best efforts at roasting and brewing.
It is important that you don't have an unbalanced coffee bar in which you
purchase Ultra Premium green coffee, roast it and then subject it to a
machine that converts it to volcanic ejecta.
I originally had problems with a Solis Maestro Plus, but Mr. Kyle Anderson
of Baratza absolutely Bent Over Backwards to solve my problem and make me
whole. I highly recommend the Solis on that basis.
In the meanwhile, I have a fine very fast grinder, the size and weight of a
Fire Hydrant residing on my counter. It's not mobile or even Tactical.
I'll have to get an SMP so I have a portable espresso setup to take along so
as not to arrive empty- handed for dinner in the future. Gretchen likes
caramel macchiatos- maybe a mocha latte would do. She's also Damian's mum
and a graphic artist. He's 3 and would catch on like Gangbusters...
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

121) From: Eddie Dove
Michael,
I cannot comment on the Solis, but I have had a KitchenAid Pro Line since
last May.  I bought it new from their website, but I do not use it for
espresso.
This grinder improved my coffee dramatically; it was a step up from a Krups
GVX1 which was a step up from a whirly blade.  About a month ago, I thought
the burrs were beginning to dull so I called KitchenAid to purchase another
set of burrs and instead they sent me a new grinder (the burrs are
ridiculously simple to replace).  I wish they hadn't done that because I did
not like the replacement grinder.  Just before I started typing this email I
had hung up with KitchenAid again.  I called and told them, " I called
before and instead of sending me new burrs you sent me a new grinder.  I
wish you hadn't done that.  This one sucks and I need you to replace it."  I
was very nice to the gentleman and had to use as few words as possible
because I just had my tonsils out.  He understood, even chuckled, but is
sending another grinder and the big brown truck will return after that to
pick up this grinder.
I tell you this just to let you know that their customer service it stellar
and the first grinder I had was excellent for a grinder of its type.
However, I do hope that the grinder I have coming will be like the first.
Eddie
On 11/24/06, Michael Rasmussen  wrote:
<Snip>

122) From: Jon Rosen
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I also agree that KitchenAid's customer service is excellent. The  
Proline grinder is built like a tank. I think it will last a long  
time. If the burrs do wear out, they are very easy to replace and  
they're not expensive either. I believe it has a 2 year warranty, and  
KitchenAid replaces machines rather than fixing them during the  
warranty period.
Jon
On Nov 24, 2006, at 2:29 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
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I also agree that KitchenAid's =
customer service is excellent. The Proline grinder is built like a tank. =
I think it will last a long time. If the burrs do wear out, they are =
very easy to replace and they're not expensive either. I believe it has =
a 2 year warranty, and KitchenAid replaces machines rather than fixing =
them during the warranty period.
Jon O= n Nov 24, 2006, at 2:29 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
Michael, I cannot comment on the Solis, but I have = had a KitchenAid Pro Line since last May.  I bought it new from their = website, but I do not use it for espresso. This grinder improved = my coffee dramatically; it was a step up from a Krups GVX1 which was a = step up from a whirly blade.  About a month ago, I thought the burrs = were beginning to dull so I called KitchenAid to purchase another set of = burrs and instead they sent me a new grinder (the burrs are ridiculously = simple to replace).  I wish they hadn't done that because I did not = like the replacement grinder.  Just before I started typing this email = I had hung up with KitchenAid again.  I called and told them, " I = called before and instead of sending me new burrs you sent me a new = grinder.  I wish you hadn't done that.  This one sucks and I need = you to replace it."  I was very nice to the gentleman and had to use = as few words as possible because I just had my tonsils out.  He = understood, even chuckled, but is sending another grinder and the big = brown truck will return after that to pick up this grinder. I = tell you this just to let you know that their customer service it = stellar and the first grinder I had was excellent for a grinder of its = type.  However, I do hope that the grinder I have coming will be like = the first.  Eddie On = 11/24/06, Michael Rasmussen <mikeraz> = wrote: As I read on I see that grinders are __very__ = important.  gulp. Do any of you have experience with the = Kitchen Aid Pro Line vs. the Solis Maestros? I don't have an = espresso machine.  Coffee brewing is either Chemex or push pot - = though I may dig out the moka pot now that I have better coffee to = drink. Michael 'biggest problem today is choosing which of the = eight from the sample pack to roast (oh poor me)' = R --    Michael Rasmussen, Portland, Ore, USA   = Be Appropriate && Follow Your Curiosity         = http://www.patch.com/words/homeroast = mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= --Apple-Mail-6--730029094--

123) From: Scott Marquardt
I own both.
I've been pretty vocal on this issue over at CG.
I bought the KAP based on hearing of little retention. The horizontal burr
axis, based on what I'd read from others, seemed a fine candidate for
eliminating retention -- something I really want for the farmer's market.
Didn't turn out that way.
Although my retention problems have diminished -- possibly a consequence of
breaking the unit it -- the retention problem with the KAP is totally
different than with the SMP. In brief, the SMP will eject all its retained
grind in the first three seconds of use with the next one. The KAP,
unfortunately, will eject its retained grind over a longer period of time,
mixed with the new grind.
Based on this disappointing discovery, I dont' recommend it where you'll be
alternating origins on several subsequent grindings.
The hopper also has a problem with bean retention. The thing is obviously
designed for people who want to keep the hopper full of beans -- something
that just doesn't make sense to a lot of home roasters and other specialty
coffee folks who don't stick with one origin all the time. Even after a
substantial hack to the hopper accoutrements (dunno what else to call the
flow control / finger protection mess in the thing), the basic countours of
the grinder's casting result in hung-up beans above the auger.
Sometimes, a bean will also get stuck at the end of the auger, between the
burrs. Grinding off the last 3/8" or so of the auger blade would probably
resolve the problem.
I'd like to see a timer on it, like the SMP. Since I grind just what I'm
going to use and don't use a hopper as a storage area, it's handier to have
a timer -- always turn it to a bit past where you know it'll be done with
your beans, and you don't need to flip a switch off.
The KAP might be able to grind longer before heating up its motor. Not sure.
It's a heavier motor, I believe, than the SMP. The KAP absolutely
disassembles more easily than the KAP, for cleaning.
Since the SMP works better for me for doing several different origins one
after another OR just doing one origin at a time, at home, I decided to keep
using it for my needs and take the KAP to the church. I do coffee there, and
the larger grind batches make the problems I identified with the KAP a bit
moot for those purposes. In fact, the relative ease of cleaning it is nice;
after brewing a pound or two at the church it's no problem to clean the unit
well before shoving it back under a shelf. And I believe it grinds a bit
faster than the SMP.
The KAP was a disappointment for my original intentions for it, but I like
it for the occasional larger grinding jobs one finds in a small/medium
church setting. The SMP will remain my favored home/market grinder, though I
suspect a Virtuoso would be pretty good too.
HTH.
On 11/24/06, Michael Rasmussen  wrote:
<Snip>

124) From: Peter Zulkowski
I never had a Kitchen Aid, but after buying several grinders in the less 
than $100. range, not being happy with them.
Searching for something a bit above a hundred, and reading of the 
troubles those give folks; I finally just bit the bullet and bought a 
Mazzer Mini.
Honest, it was tough deciding between it and a Rocky. Read several 
grinder shoot out results, never figured I would be unhappy with a 
Rocky, but did figure that I would always regret it if I did not buy a 
Mazzer.
Hope this helps..
PeterZ
Suffered through WAY TOO MANY cheap grinders, here in LHC.
Les wrote:
<Snip>

125) From: Jared Andersson
I don't have a Kitchen Aid Pro but am very happy with my Solis Maestros Plus
even though the grind adjustment broke after about 6 months.  The customer
service was very good and I was sent a stronger replacement piece for free.
New versions have corrected this problem as I understand it.  For
non-espresso needs I think this is a great grinder.  I actually like its
course grind better than my Mazzer Mini's course grind.  Taking into account
that the non-replaceable bottom grind mech will be dead in about 300 lbs I
still think this is a great deal.  At about one pound a week of coffee I
drink using this grinder that is 6 years of grinding.  Pretty good for its
price I think.  Now I agree that for espresso you need a Rocky or better and
it really does make sense to get a Rocky/Mazzer since we will all be
drinking coffee a lot longer than 6 years.  However if $150 is the most one
can commit to a non-espresso grinder I would not hesitate in buying my Solis
Maestro Plus again.  Jared
On 11/24/06, Michael Rasmussen  wrote:
<Snip>

126) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
Michael,
I have been very pleased with my Solis Maestro.
I can't compare it to the more expensive grinders but it is FAR  
superior to the burr grinder I got with my Zach and Dani roaster (I  
now have a iRoast2) years ago. I think I have had the solis for about  
1 year now.
dave
On Nov 24, 2006, at 9:50 AM, Michael Rasmussen wrote:
<Snip>

127) From: raymanowen
"...non-espresso grinder..."
"...the grind adjustment broke after about 6 months."
"...the non-replaceable bottom grind mech..."
Has this list morphed into a joke line?
With 50,000 comedians out of work, we're cracking jokes anyway.
Even with the SNAFU upper burr, I used the SMP to grind acceptable pitch for
espresso brewing, and even the Turkish dust, although I've never actually
brewed Turkish-
My Grind adjustment ring is intact after two years of continuous use-
If you did replace the Grind adjustment ring, you were about two steps away
from removing the entire gearmotor.
What's not to replace? If you reinstall with a new gearmotor, you just
replaced the irreplaceable bottom grind mechanism.
If you're just talking about the lower burr, it's child's play. It just
unscrews and you only need to remove the bean hopper and upper burr to
access it to lock on a pair of Vise- Grip pliers. Clockwise tap, and it's
loose.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
So much fuss about a non-problem-

128) From: Scjgb3
I have wasted more money buying grinders than I  care to think about, 2 
blades and two burr grinders later I hit the list up for  some advice, 8 days later 
I have a rocky sitting on my counter. Without a doubt  the best decision I 
have made in my coffee life. 
    The coffee taste soooooo much better. The delicate  features of some of 
the coffees are really coming out in the cup, not as bitter  and a lot smoother.
     I know the price is steep but IMHO, well worth  it. Consider it an 
investment in your well being. 
 
scjgb3
 

129) From:
Michael:
Boy this is always a tuff one when it comes up; the basic theme is always to buy the best one your pocket book can handle.
The Wall Street Journel, on 11/17/06 did a review of six "home" burr grinders.
I was going to post the article here but my online subscription has expired.
There final picks were the Kitchen Aid Pro line at 199 and the best value being the Solis Maestro burr grinder at 115. Tom sells the Solis and I would respect his evaluation on any product.
I would have added the Mazzer Mini if I was going to write the article.
There final line about whether or not a burr grinder made better tasting coffee was plain dumb;  they should have done more/better research.
ginny
---- Michael Rasmussen  wrote: 
<Snip>

130) From: scott miller
ginny,
I don't have the online subscription service, but did read the article. I
thought their recommendations, considering the focus of the article, were
good ones.
When I gave the article to my mom, she still wanted to use a coupon at Bed,
Bath & Beyond to get a $50 Cuisinart burr grinder... At least I talked her
out of the Cuisinart Grind n Brew... It may be a decent brewer, I don't
know, but having a grinder integrated into the package just sounds goofy to
me. Since she's set on the grinder, I'll be upgrading her drip brewer for
the holidays.
cheers,
Scott
On 11/25/06, pchforever  wrote:
<Snip>

131) From: Brett Mason
Hi Scott,
I threw out my grind-n-brew several years ago, as many on the list have as
well.  My real problem was the steam-muck that forms at the top, and the
requisite clean-the-kitchen response which ensued...   Simple turns out to
be better...
Brett
On 11/25/06, scott miller  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

132) From: Michael Mccandless
We picked one up on impulse.
It was returned the same day.
Before grinding any coffee, I checked out the burrs - not
anywhere near sharp.
They looked like they were ground down on a power sander.
Went back together & returned.
It's high on the "Not Recommended" list.
McSparky
On 11/25/06, scott miller  wrote:
<Snip>

133) From: scott miller
Good to hear the input. I can't convince my mom that a TV is the way to go.
She just can't abide by the "odd" design.
I think she's OK with the Capresso MT 5xx ... at least, that's what I'm
telling myself for the moment.
cheers,
Scott
On 11/25/06, Michael Mccandless  wrote:
<Snip>

134) From: raymanowen
"Cuisinart burr grinder..." Go Fish
"Makes a Great Gift"- I can hear it now.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Doesn't Costco have these? The espresso supply house.

135) From: Sheila Quinn
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Hey, Costco even has Gaggias now - online anyway! They probably have 
decent grinders, too. I haven't checked, though.
Sheila
raymanowen wrote:
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Hey, Costco even has Gaggias now - online anyway! They probably have
decent grinders, too. I haven't checked, though.
Sheila
raymanowen wrote:
"Cuisinart burr
grinder..." Go Fish
  
"Makes a Great Gift"- I can hear it
now. 
  
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
  
Doesn't Costco have these? The espresso supply house.
--------------030807000502030609020302--

136) From: Sheila Quinn
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My bad grinders aren't even worthy of the closet - they're in the 
garage! One is the Krups (Kraps) burr grinder and a Kraps whirly blade. 
They accompany two cheap coffee makers also in the garage. Not sure why 
I even saved the coffee makers - a Mr. Coffee and a Braun - yuck!
Sheila
True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69) wrote:
<Snip>
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My bad grinders aren't even worthy of the closet - they're in the
garage! One is the Krups (Kraps) burr grinder and a Kraps whirly blade.
They accompany two cheap coffee makers also in the garage. Not sure why
I even saved the coffee makers - a Mr. Coffee and a Braun - yuck! 
Sheila
True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69) wrote:
  Message
  
  
  I have one of those now resides in my
closet....LOL
  
  

Dennis AKA FC1(SW) Dennis W. True CS/CS-5 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) FPO AE 09532-2830

Man of many hats! HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean  “On station and on point 159 and counting down…" ”Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support of Operation Eagle!"

    "Cuisinart burr grinder..." Go Fish "Makes a Great Gift"- I can hear it now. Cheers -RayO, aka Opa! Doesn't Costco have these? The espresso supply house. --------------080507020702060309080109--

137) From: Sheila Quinn
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BTW... I am not in any way endorsing them as suppliers of equipment. 
Please don't jump down my throat for mentioning that. Obviously, I 
endorse SMs for supplies!!!
Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>
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BTW... I am not in any way endorsing them as suppliers of equipment.
Please don't jump down my throat for mentioning that. Obviously, I
endorse SMs for supplies!!!
Sheila Quinn wrote:
  
Hey, Costco even has Gaggias now - online anyway! They probably have
decent grinders, too. I haven't checked, though.
  
Sheila
  
  
  
  
  raymanowen
wrote:
  "Cuisinart burr
grinder..." Go Fish
    
"Makes a Great Gift"- I can hear it
now. 
    
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
    
Doesn't Costco have these? The espresso supply house.
  
--------------020102030801080209020701--

138) From: Lynne
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Costco has an indefinite return policy.
(That's why I love that place.... and that's where MY Cuisinart Burr 
Grinder went...)
Lynne
On Nov 26, 2006, at 10:05 AM, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69) wrote:
<Snip>
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Costco has an indefinite return policy.
(That's why I love that place.... and that's where MY Cuisinart Burr
Grinder went...)
Lynne
On Nov 26, 2006, at 10:05 AM, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69) wrote:
=
Arial0000,0000,FFFFI
have one of those now resides in my =
closet....LOL
=
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=
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Monotype CorsivaFC1(SW) Dennis W.
TrueTahoma =
Times New =
RomanCS/CS-5<=
param>Tahoma 
Times New RomanUSS Dwight
D. Eisenhower (CVN
=
69)Tahoma 
Times New RomanFPO AE
=
09532-2830TahomaTimes New RomanMan of many
=
hats!Tahoma 
Times New RomanHG/DB
and Z&D roasting in the Indian
=
OceanTahoma 
=
Helvetica8080,8080,=
0000 “On
station and on point
=
0000,8080,0000159=
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and counting
=
down…"Tahoma 
=
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0000”Direct
support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support
of =
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=
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color>FFFF,0000,0000gle8080,8080,0000!"=
Tahoma =
 
Tahoma 
"Cuisinart burr grinder..." Go Fish
"Makes a Great  Gift"- I can hear it
now. 
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Doesn't Costco have these? The espresso supply house.=
--Apple-Mail-1--600648852--

139) From: Lynne
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Getting ready for a garage sale, maybe?
Lynne
On Nov 26, 2006, at 1:47 AM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>
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Getting ready for a garage sale, maybe?
Lynne
On Nov 26, 2006, at 1:47 AM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
 My bad grinders aren't even worthy of the closet - they're
in the garage! One is the Krups (Kraps) burr grinder and a Kraps
whirly blade. They accompany two cheap coffee makers also in the
garage. Not sure why I even saved the coffee makers - a Mr. Coffee and
a Braun - yuck! 
 Sheila
--Apple-Mail-2--600556502--

140) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have one of those now resides in my closet....LOL
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
CS/CS-5 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
Man of many hats! 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean 
 "On station and on point 159 and counting down..." 
"Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support
of Operation Eagle!" 
 
 
"Cuisinart burr grinder..." Go Fish
"Makes a Great Gift"- I can hear it now. 
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Doesn't Costco have these? The espresso supply house. 

141) From: Mike Garfias
if this is the cuisinart burr grinder you're looking at:http://
www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU14327&ref=http%3A%2F% 
2Ffroogle%2Egoogle%2Ecom%2Ffroogle%3Fq%3Dcuisinart%2Bburr%2Bcoffee% 
2Bgrinder%26hl%3Den%26btng%3Dsearch
Avoid it.  I made the mistake of going "hey, its only $30 (costco)  
how bad could it be?"
The grind quality sucks.
On Nov 25, 2006, at 5:17 PM, scott miller wrote:
<Snip>

142) From: scott miller
Yep, that's the one my mom wants to buy; try as I might she's set on
spending just $50 for this thing and using her coupon to get $5 off. It's
unfortunate, since $$ is not an issue for mom. I guess experience is going
to have to be the convincer for her. I may just buy a SMP as a preemptive
measure and keep it around my house until she gets frustrated.
I mean, I only have 4 burr grinders and a whirly blade. What's another
grinder gonna hurt?
cheers,
Scott
On 11/26/06, Mike Garfias  wrote:
<Snip>

143) From: raymanowen
"What's another grinder gonna hurt?"
Your credibility and dignity, Scott! -ro

144) From: scott miller
OH... I'll check that credibility index ... no concerns there; another
grinder means I have more equipment from which to gain experience.
Dignity?  Umm, I'll get back to ya on that one .
cheers,
Scott
On 11/26/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>

145) From: John Brown
the Zass is a very nice grinder, but if you have a problem like i have, 
neuropathy.   my fingers are  numb they have the  sensation of pins and 
needles.  not much fine motor control and not much strength.   the Zass 
is more than a little hard to hold and turn the handle at the same time.
so i went to Google to look for a hand operated coffee mill.
Zass was the number one that came up.  then the high dollar grain mills. 
  finally i came across a mill made in the Czech Republic.  it is made 
by Porkert, the universal mill has a thumb screw to mount it to a 
table.  this makes it much easier for me to use.  i have only done one 
grind with it so far.  made a good grind for my french press pot.

146) From: Brett Mason
That's a great report, John!  Do you have any pictures posted for the
lookieloos like me?
Thx,
Brett
On 9/7/07, John Brown  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

147) From: Tom Ulmer
And here I was hoping the whole fetish thing would die down...

148) From: John Brown
no but i can have if any body wants to see it
Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>

149) From: Larry Johnson
Sure, I'd like to see.
On 9/7/07, John Brown  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

150) From: kvindlog
Me too!
-------------- Original message from John Brown : -------------- 
<Snip>

Me too!

 

-------------- Original message from John Brown <jtbknives>: -------------- > no but i can have if any body wants to see it

151) From: stereoplegic
when i was in the market for hand grinders, the Porkert was one of the 
few grain mills i considered, because it had a cover over the burrs so 
that what it ground (in this case coffee) went only one direction: 
downward. most of the grain mills you find (at least on eBay) have 
uncovered burrs. my kitchen gets messy enough already.
John Brown wrote:
<Snip>

152) From: John Brown
i cut a large plastic jug to fit under the grinder,  that did  quite 
well no mess.  there did not appear to be much static either but we had 
a high humidity evening for the Arizona desert.
stereoplegic wrote:
<Snip>

153) From: John Brown
has any one had a problem with their Maestro Solis Plus?
mine jams up if i put very many beans in the hopper.  then i have to 
take to whole thing apart shake the beans out.  pry any beans out of the 
grinder assembly put it all back together and try again.  this is 
beginning to make me mad.

154) From: raymanowen
Mine had another problem, but never anything like this. Nothing would
require you to take the whole thing apart. I can only imagine you're
getting the upper burr installed incorrectly. -ro
On 10/1/07, John Brown  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

155) From: Richard Ferguson
Can't say that I have.  I usually only grind enough for a few cups at a time
though, how much are you grinding?
<Snip>

156) From: Peter Minkow
My apologies if this has been beaten to death, but my Bodum Antigua just bit
the dust which is just as well as it didn't grind fine. In the $100 range,
what are the advantages of the Maestro over the Capresso Infinity, or
others?
Thanks.
Peter
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157) From: Jack M. Rogers
Peter, what are you grinding for?  Espresso?  Press?  Drip?
My apologies if this message shows up 48 hours after your question, as they often do.  But as I type this (2:14 PM CST), there are no replies yet.
Jack

158) From: Karl Schendel
Peter Minkow wrote:
<Snip>
I can't pretend to experience with both.  I like my (recent
vintage) Maestro.  From reading various opinions on forums such
as home-barista, I'd guess that the Infinity and Maestro are
roughly comparable.  Baratza has been incrementally improving
the Maestro since they got it from Solis; who knows about
the Capresso.
The Maestro has 40 steps to the Capresso's 16, so that might be
a slight advantage there.  The Capresso has some sort of timer
thingie that you need the Maestro Plus for, so that's advantage
Capresso if you care about such things.
Neither is going to make it as an espresso grinder, but should be
decent enough for anything else.  I use the Maestro mostly for
Aeropress.
Dream grinder?  I really like a lot of the ideas in the Versalab
M3.  The execution, not so much.  How about the burr-set and
stable burr mounts / adjusters from the Robur, with a straight
thru path and fluffer a la Versalab, in a grind-to-dose package
that fits under my counter?  The first company to come up with
that one for under 2 grand wins...
Excellent Golden Monkey (specialteas) cup is empty, I think I hear
the Aeropress calling...
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159) From: Angelo
Actually, there are tweaks for the Antigua that allows it to grind 
very fine. You'll have to look in the archives and /or Google groups- 
alt.coffee...
<Snip>
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160) From: raymanowen
" Baratza has been incrementally improving the Maestro "
The only way to improve a chunk of coal is to burn it.
On Fri, Feb 13, 2009 at 2:32 PM, Karl Schendel  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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161) From: Steve Barber
I guess that all depends...one man's coal is another man's diamond. 
Steve

162) From: Les
The Grinder is the gateway to excellent coffee.  You don't get good
coffee without a good grind.  If you are going to spend less than the
cost of a Rocky, I wouldn't buy an electric grinder but a good Zass
hand grinder.  After the Zass, I would rate grinders as follows:
If you are going to spend less than $500.00 I would go for a Rocky.
After grinding a lot with a Rocky and a Mazzer Mini, I would rate the
Rocky higher than the Mini.  The problem with the mini is the
aluminium carrier for the burrs.  They simply flex too much.  That
doesn't mean the Mazzer Mini is a bad grinder, but I don't think you
gain anything by going up to a Mini over the Rocky.  You actually may
be taking a step down.  Once you get over 500.00 you are getting into
the Macap grinders and the other great grinders.  After doing a lot of
research, I settled on the Cimbali Max Hybrid.  Replacement burrs are
reasonable.  With the bigger conicals you are looking at $300.00 plus
to replace the burrs.  I really miss my Mazzer Major.
The problem with the $100-200 grinders is they are going to wear out
and you will be replacing them.  After a month or so your coffee will
be average at best.  I don't want my excellent beans and awesome roast
to be reduced to average by the grinder.
Les
On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 2:32 PM,   wrote:
<Snip>
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163) From: Barry Luterman
I usually agree with you. I moved from a Rocky to a Mazzer Mini. However,I
noticed a definite improvement in my shots after I moved from the Rocky to
the Mazzer. Never the less, I find myself lusting after the Cimbali. When I
finally get my coffee den I am thinking of an espresso corner featuring my
Brewtus and Cimballi Hybred. My brewed coffee niche will contain my Mini and
Bodum Santos.
On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 2:26 PM, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
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164) From: raymanowen
" I really miss my Mazzer Major."
There was a story going around that some guy had gotten one of these fire
hydrants for a song. Helluva note- he let somebody juggle the thing for him.
This guy thought he was some kind of brute. But he hadn't had his Wheaties
that day...
I got a Twist-Lock cord plug for mine. [I already had one as a spare for
screen printing flash cure dryers that needed absolute dedicated circuits
and protection from equipment snatchers] I was going to disabuse the idea of
anyone's borrowing the BUFF.
Nice idea, but when I went out to Grainger's to get the L5-20 connector--
Egad! They're Mighty proud of their Hubbell stuff now. The cheap ones were
$30. Oh, well- log(3.16) Vast idea.
Cheers, Mabuhay und Guter Abend -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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165) From: Barry Luterman
Les how does the Major compare to the Cimbali?
On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 5:40 PM,  wrote:
<Snip>
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166) From: Joseph Robertson
Ray,
do you have any experience with the SuperJolly? Just wondering your
opinion on it.
JoeR
On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 7:40 PM,   wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and palate reform.
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167) From: Dick Cook
OK,  I'm pretty new here and don't want to ruffle feathers, I know grinders 
are as controversial as how to tell roast level but here's my story.
I had a Silvia/Solis combo for about eight years and became quite 
proficient.  No fancy PID or mods just consistent (or I thought ) technique 
and a lot of reading and practice.  I was pretty happy with my shots and my 
wife and friends were happy with the fancy milk drinks that made them shun 
*& swill.
  Last year I decided if I could be this successful with this kit, I could 
be amazing with better stuff.  After reading everything I could get my hands 
on I called WLL, who I have been very happy with in the past, and told them 
of my two picks and they helped me narrow down to a Brewtus II.  Knowing a 
grinder was also important I went with a Rocky.  They recommended a more 
expensive grinder but wanting to have a place to live, with wife and family, 
my wife, loving good coffee but also thinking I was nuts, lowered the 
proverbial boom and I settled for the Rocky.
Although I'm sure the grinder was a good grinder, in combination with my 
Brewtus II was never able to achieve a REALLY good shot consistently.  I 
worked, read, practiced, tweaked, read more, worked harder, stirred, 
leveled, weighed, even took up roasting my own knowing that would give me 
the flavors I was reading about.   Zilch, Nada, nothing.  Where are the 
strawberries, blueberries chocolate, flowers?  My wife was thoroughly 
enjoying these flavors in her regular coffee, so I knew I was learning the 
home roast thing, but my straight shots of nectar were not there.
Last week I broke down and ordered a Mazzer Mini Electric Model B,  the 
model with the electronic timer/doser and the larger 64mm burrs.  What a 
difference.  The flavors are there that you all are talking about all the 
time.  Fruit, chocolate, whatever is apparently supposed to be there finally 
is there.
I knew a grinder was important and I know I still don't have "the best" but 
it works 100% better with my machine, than the Rocky.  I have no intentions 
of knocking the Rocky, I know it is a rock solid grinder with a great 
reputation.  But when all else fails, your grinder choice can make the 
difference between happy and this coffee is driving me nuts.
H-D Rider

168) From: Jim Russell
Joe,
I've got a super jolly and I love it.  It's a workhorse.  I got it used for
something like $230 6 or 7 years ago and have ground hundreds of pounds of
coffee with zero problems.  The only maintenance I've had to do has been
regular cleaning and replacing the burrs.  I think next time I replace the
burrs I'll try the new titanium ones.
Jim
On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 10:34 PM, Joseph Robertson wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Roasting them almost as fast as they come
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169) From: kevin creason
what do the burrs run on a superjolly? regular and titanium... future costs
should figure in to planning a better grinder.
On Sun, Feb 15, 2009 at 12:29 AM, Jim Russell  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
-Kevin
/* Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you
with experience. */
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170) From: Karl Schendel
--- On Sat, 2/14/09, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
Nonsense.
Gasification, distillation, hydrogenation, coking, etc.
I think your position on the Baratza grinders is needlessly
extremist.  The Maestro at least is a good value;  nothing
in its price range has a clear advantage.
<Snip>
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171) From: Joseph Robertson
Jim,
Thanks for getting back. I am currently using a SuperJolly in a
commercial environment with great results. I knew I had a sweet
machine. I never got to read very many Lister's thoughts on it. Maybe
because it is on the higher end for home use and not that common. I
would like to hear thoughts on the titanium vers standard burrs. Les?
are you using titanium yet?
Cheers,
JoeR
On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 10:29 PM, Jim Russell  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and palate reform.
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172) From: Jim Russell
Kevin,
The regular burrs are around $45 and the "Duranium" titanium alloy burrs are
around $70 - $90.  Both prices are before shipping.  The Duranium burrs are
said to last 3 to 6 times as long as the regular burrs and grind faster.
Jim
On Sun, Feb 15, 2009 at 7:37 AM, kevin creason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Roasting them almost as fast as they come
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173) From: Jim Russell
Joe,
The only thing I know about the titanium burrs is what I've read on the
net.  I'll certainly post a review of them if I decide to try them.  There
is a fairly lengthy discussion of them on
home-bariasta
.
Jim
On Sun, Feb 15, 2009 at 10:23 AM, Joseph Robertson wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Roasting them almost as fast as they come
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174) From: Joseph Robertson
Jim ,
I can see in a commercial setting I can see there is only one
practical choice. Long term is nice.
I'm still using my titanium hammer. As long as I don't try and chip
concrete with it. <]:^0
Joe
On Sun, Feb 15, 2009 at 10:41 AM, Jim Russell  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and palate reform.
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175) From: miKe mcKoffee
The new Duranium burrs not only last longer but are reported to grind faster
than stock SJ burrs. Because of the more aggressive grind pitch have been a
few reported cases of motor stalling, I have not yet tried the Duranium
burrs with any of my SJ's (have 3). FWIW stock SJ burrs take a relatively
slow 7-8 seconds to grind for double. Slow in busy commercial setting
compared to ~4 seconds with Major (also have 3.) OTOH stock SJ grinds fast
compared to a Rocky or Mini with their much smaller burrs. 
Grind quality wise and resultant cups suggest reviewing the lengthy far
flung H-B Titan Grinder Project. My experience suggests a Rocky with new
burrs can match the cup of a Major, but not consistently. And Rocky's burrs
need to be replaced at about 75# intervals to maintain highest quality
grind.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.NorwestCoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIIhttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVII.htmSweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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176) From: jeff michel
It is a "Major" difference.
Sorry, I couldn't resist
On Feb 14, 2009, at 8:15 PM, Barry Luterman wrote:
<Snip>
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177) From: Michael Dhabolt
miKe,
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
I've heard this also.  At the paltry difference in cost, my first
inclination was to recommend them. Have you heard any feedback about
possible weak starting capacitors being the cause of the stalls? Is
the motor stall thing happening to a lot of machines or just a few?
I've been trying to keep up with the HB thread about this but haven't
decided if I should recommend these burrs or not.
Mike (just plain)
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178) From: raymanowen
Not-The SJ is a 90% scale of a Major methinks. The exploded parts drawing
looks about identical to the Major.
One thing I was afraid of was the motor power. It only goes one place- the
beans. Heat the beans? 14g (PF basket level full of beans) doesn't spend
long enough in the grinder to pick up much heat. Phht! and they're done.
Still, grinding 5+ minute frozen beans into a frothing pitcher, then tapping
the grounds back into the bean measuring filter basket leaves the basket
cold. Sure, the grinder must heat the grounds, but they still make the PF
basket cold. The Major doesn't give hot grounds. One more step in my fair
test to prove espresso is an evil drink, like everybody else ever brewed for
me.
By the by- the Capresso pump just stopped vibrating as I finished the Sunday
shot of exquisite IMV. Thought I turned it off, but did two cleanup flushes
and that was it. I add ~30% boiling water to the 50° tap water in the
reservoir. It feeds 100° - 110° F water through the pump to feed prehea=
ted
water to the thermoblock heater.
The Carpesso served yeoman's duty as my test bed- RIP! I only wanted
to fairly prove my firm suspicion that people who use any coffee beans for
espresso were wasting the beans. The test had a good outcome- my premise was
completely false, happy to say.
My espresso machine adventure was only to disprove the drink itself, so I
couldn't afford to devote a pricey machine to Demolition Derby. I'm really
surprised it took nearly 4 years to fail.
At the start of this test, I suspected the Paisley grind from shiny toy
coffee grinders purchased from Grinders_R_Us disables any efforts to brew
coffee. If the grind is a failure, NO brewing method can succeed, and that's
the waste of beans. How sad.
People that can afford a new Land Barge every few years, but not an
excellent grinder that will be almost permanent for them cause wonder. The
Grinder is your silent partner to coffee nirvana, while vehicle tax,
license, insurance and fuel provide questionable enjoyment.
Some un-named Arschloch company (I forget which) actually suggested I start
out with a Livia 90 about 4 years ago. Too shiny and way too many fake
buttons for a coffee pot.
The Bialetti Venus just did a Wunderbar job on the new jar of 30 hour aged
IMV. First "Poof" out of the jar when I unsealed it proved the FC++ roast is
just going to get superb. Drop dead gorgeous already. The first shot was the
Capresso's last. RIP.
Cheers, Mabuhay und fast guten Morgen -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
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179) From: raymanowen
"...a few reported cases of motor stalling,"
Any time a PSC motor stalls, it's time to replace the capacitor on the
motor. These are non-polarized electrolytics, and they notoriously lose
capacity as they age. With the capacity loss, the motor also loses torque.
If you remove the capacitor completely, there is no rotating magnetic field
so the armature can't spin. It can't even start.
It wouldn't hurt anything to use a larger capacity capacitor, since the duty
cycle is nil. Never use a lower value cap. The larger one would pass the
spec value on the way down eventually.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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180) From: Les
<Snip>
Power  balance is about equal.  I love the size of the Cimbali over
the Major.  The Cimbali is quieter.  I give a slight edge, (very
slight edge) to grind quality to the Major.  The Major is easier to
clean.  I like the way all the Mazzers adjust their grind.  However
the Cimbali is very accurate, and repeatable.  I have had no problem
going from espresso to drip and then back to espresso grind.   I like
the simplicity of the Mazzers too.  Now that I have taken the Cimbali
around the block a few times, I am happy with it.  If confronted with
the choice between the two grinders, I would take the Cimbali.  It is
nice having it right next to the espresso machine.  The Major was just
too big for our kitchen.
Les
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