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Topic: A way to go (9 msgs / 196 lines)
1) From: alfred
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Just popped for a pound of the fresh roasted beans from our local coffee =
roaster. We have a big one here in Medford Oregon.
Frankly the beans that I roasted with my Pop Lite can't begin to compare =
with these. They have a rich color and all all identical. Oh well, back =
to the drawing board.

2) From: MMore
I've got to say that I've never bought roasted beans that have come close to 
even my average batch - WBPII and Alpenroast.  Sounds kinda snobbish, I 
guess...but true. 
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.

3) From: alfred
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mike;
Sounds like you are the Tiger Woods of coffee roasting.
 Hopefully I will learn.
By the way Mike; I was born and raised on the eastern shore of Maryland, =
I moved west early in life.
I ordered a Smithfield Ham for Christmas from Virginia and these people =
out here don't know what the heck I'm talking about.

4) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Alfred,
      You are after taste, not looks,  I often make a roast that has a 
mixture of the same bean at different degrees of roast.  When I wok 
roast, I simply take some out near the end of the first crack and the 
more during the pause and the rest at the point in the second crack 
that I want to stop.  I am sure that if you could buy folgers as whole 
bean, they would all look like they had the same degree of roast.  It 
is good to be able to make a batch at a consistent level but it is not 
necessarily a sign that a better cup is on the way.
Jim Gundlach
On Dec 23, 2003, at 4:00 PM, alfred wrote:
<Snip>
Alfred,
     You are after taste, not looks,  I often make a roast that has a
mixture of the same bean at different degrees of roast.  When I wok
roast, I simply take some out near the end of the first crack and the
more during the pause and the rest at the point in the second crack
that I want to stop.  I am sure that if you could buy folgers as whole
bean, they would all look like they had the same degree of roast.  It
is good to be able to make a batch at a consistent level but it is not
necessarily a sign that a better cup is on the way.
Jim Gundlach
On Dec 23, 2003, at 4:00 PM, alfred wrote:
ArialJust popped for a
pound of the fresh roasted beans from our local coffee roaster. We
have a big one here in Medford Oregon.
ArialFrankly the beans that I
roasted with my Pop Lite can't begin to compare with these. They have
a rich color and all all identical. Oh well, back to the drawing board.

5) From: alfred
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jim: I'm not giving up, thanks to all the posts about the great coffee =
you guys roast. It's just that my first two batches, starting with the =
French Press first thing in the morning, were really not that great. =
I've got six samples left to work on. :The first two had that, what I =
call, a raw taste compared to  the roasted beans I had been buying =
before I decided to try roasting.

6) From: Peter Barnes
Alfred,
It sounds to me like you need to look into adjustments to raise the 
temperature in your popper.  A simple way to do that is to roaster a 
larger batch size than you are doing (170g instead of 150g, or something 
like that - you may have to "help" in the bean circulation process if 
you do this).  I would also suggest that you might do a roast very, very 
deep into second crack, until the beans are completely singed beyond 
repair- just so you can get a feel for what is happening to beans in 
various stages of development.  I would guess that the beans you are 
roasting are not roasting evenly and not being roasted long enough. 
I had a Poppery II that wasn't getting hot enough - the only way the 
beans would even come close to second crack was to remove the copy and 
cover the mouth of the popper with a thick piece of cardboard.  With a 
popper, there are many variables that impact the roast - ambient 
temperature, bean movement, internal thermostat, batch size, etc. 
Again, I would recommend trying to up the batch size a bit, and roasting 
until the beans are charred.  Don't be afraid of smoke coming out of the 
popper - until you understand the stages of the roast you're not going 
to be able to consistently roast beans the way you want them.
cheers
peter
alfred wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
drawing board.
This is a good thing to do, compare your roast's appearance and taste with
that of someone with more experience. Some beans naturally roast unevenly,
like some Yemens and Ethiopians. You should be roasting Colombian or
Guatemalan beans, since these (if you buy from SM's) will roast evenly under
normal conditions. If these come out uneven, then you have a problem with
the popper or your method. I still say get a side inlet popper and toss the
Presto into the parts bin.
--

8) From: AlChemist John
Alfred,
If you happen to be anywhere in the range of Myrtle Creek to Yoncalla, I 
would happily work with you in person to get you running.  You really can 
meet or exceed the quality of most roasters around, if for nothing else, 
you can take the time and detail to get it right.  Let me know if you would 
like to meet up some time.
Sometime around 19:10 12/23/2003, alfred typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting and Blending by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/

9) From: MMore
It's really more of an indictment of most cafe's and coffee shops than any 
skill I posses.  Believe me, I have "Char bucked" quite a few batches :)
Don't know about a Va. Ham?  Blasphemy!!!!
Sounds like you are the Tiger Woods of coffee roasting.
 Hopefully I will learn.
By the way Mike; I was born and raised on the eastern shore of Maryland, I 
moved west early in life.
I ordered a Smithfield Ham for Christmas from Virginia and these people out 
here don't know what the heck I'm talking about.
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.


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