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Topic: Unorthodox views welcome (4 msgs / 89 lines)
1) From: Clark
Any such views may elicit an occasional heated response , but some 
appreciate  reading the experiences of others who enjoy the wonderful 
tastes of raw  coffee beans to which the process of preparation has not 
done too much damage.  
Every machine yet made has shortcomings, and most , (unlike the Viols 
and certain natural products) do not improve with age, and will have their 
places taken by better machines in due time. 
One may question whether anything so deficient in complexity that it can  
be reduced to a science as opposed to remaining an art is worth doing in  
the  span of life.   Or is it only that the true compexity has not been  
understood?   Perhaps an awareness of our limitations may not be amiss.    
When it manifests itself with a sense of humor, I think it's called win win. 
In any case,  happy healthy new year to  each and every one.

2) From: Ed Needham
Raw beans...
When I was in Maui last year, I had the privilege of wandering amongst the
coffee trees and pondering all things coffee at the now defunct Kaanapali
(Maui Moka) Plantation.  I plucked a couple of green coffee cherries and
tasted the pulp and the bean inside.  Of course they were very unripe (June
with a ripe date of October), but it was not totally unpleasant.  Very green
and bitter taste, but I didn't spit them out.  I also picked up a some of the
dried cherries on the ground and chewed the green beans that had truly been
dry processed .  Or maybe that was dry-unprocessed.  Again, not an
unpleasant experience.  Bitter and green, but kind of 'tea-like'.  My
preference is definitely roasted, but as in most things, I had to try it
once.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
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3) From: David Lewis
At 5:27 AM -0500 12/30/03, Clark  wrote:
<Snip>
I think it's a question of where the art and science join. Just as in 
photography, you want the negative processing to be repeatable so 
that you can concentrate on the art of interpreting the resulting 
negatives in your prints (instead of just swearing), in roasting you 
want, I think, the art to come in the exploration of the panoply of 
flavors of which most beans are capable, instead of flailing about 
because you tasted something once and have no idea how or if you can 
get back to it.
Best,
	David
-- 
"A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is 
nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."
Antoine de Saint-Exupery

4) From: Angelo
Isn't Win Win one of those Pandas we were given by the Chinese government?
<Snip>


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