HomeRoast Digest


Topic: ? wok roasting ? (12 msgs / 272 lines)
1) From: Dave Huddle
Pecan Jim,
I'm sort of interested in trying wok roasting, but my situation is a
bit limiting.
	1) NO vent in the kitchen.
	2) I want to be able to roast when the weather is COLD,
	RAINING, WINDY, DARK, etc., but my gas grill is a permanent
	installation.
SO - any advice/comments/opinions about using a 50 year old Coleman
camping stove in the garage?  The stove still works fine on Coleman
"white' gas.
I've got a place in the garage where it would be safe to use the
stove. 
The stove has never been used for coffee roasting, but my Mom used to
make great fried chicken or fish on it many years ago.
Dave - heading out to the garage to light the kerosene heater before
roasting some Ethiopian Harar in the Alp.
<Snip>

2) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Dave,
     I don't have any experiences with the Coleman white gas camping 
stove but if it will fry chicken, it should wok roast.  Find one of the 
rings that woks rest on and focuses heat on the bottom of the wok and 
you should have no trouble roast a pound or more at one time.  Again 
the important thing is to get a wok that is heavy enough to diffuse the 
heat from the flame.
     Jim
On Jan 1, 2004, at 9:31 AM, Dave Huddle wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Dave Huddle
Pecan Jim,
Thanks for the reply.   I'll be out looking for a wok & ring this weekend.
Dave	Westerville, OH
(Who has a PECAN tree [the state tree of TEXAS] growing in his back yard.)
<Snip>

4) From: Angelo
I believe Taylor& Eng (or Eng & Taylor) in San F. sold a wok-stand to place 
over a stove. They probably sell the stove, too...
a.
<Snip>

5) From: Peter Barnes
I use a cast-iron wok that I found at Macy's for $7.  I put a cast-iron 
heat diffuser under it.  Those two combined work perfectly.  I only have 
singed beans when I'm being a dumb roaster. 
Angelo wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: John Abbott
We bought ours from Kitchen Arts.  They are all over the map.  It wasn't 
at all expensive and came with a Wok cook book and some stir sticks for 
about $25 I think.   I didn't intend to get into Woking on the Wild Side 
- but Dr. Cathy talked me into it.  And now I'm glad.  We do a little 
Wok roasting about once a month just for the change of pace and taste.  
It doesn't take long to master.
John - drinking a bad blend.  I'm just not good at blending in!
Angelo wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: peter zulkowski
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Found one that looks like it may work....http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#69049358&categoryF273Hope this helps,
PeterZ
Dave Huddle wrote:
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8) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Actually these are more like what I would consider ideal:
       http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item%84118259&category887
    Jim Gundlach
On Jan 2, 2004, at 2:41 PM, peter zulkowski wrote:
<Snip>
Actually these are more like what I would consider ideal:http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item%84118259&category887   Jim Gundlach
On Jan 2, 2004, at 2:41 PM, peter zulkowski wrote:
Found one that looks like it may work....
0000,0000,EEEhttp://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#69049358&categoryF273Hope this helps,
PeterZ
Dave Huddle wrote:
Pecan Jim,
Thanks for the reply.   I'll be out looking for a wok & ring this
weekend.
Dave    Westerville, OH
(Who has a PECAN tree [the state tree of TEXAS] growing in his back
yard.)
  
Dave,
     I don't have any experiences with the Coleman white gas camping 
stove but if it will fry chicken, it should wok roast.  Find one of
the 
rings that woks rest on and focuses heat on the bottom of the wok and 
you should have no trouble roast a pound or more at one time.  Again 
the important thing is to get a wok that is heavy enough to diffuse
the 
heat from the flame.
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9) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Those sure don't look like cast iron to me, Jim.  My guess would be steel.
One of the nicest things about cast iron is that it will develop a carbon
coating if you treat it right.  I have managed to sort-of season my steel
wok after years of trying, but it is a very fragile coating and easily
ruined.  Rust is a nasty taste in food, and I can't imagine that it adds
much to coffee, either.
I found out why cast iron "seasons" so much more easily.  I was reading a
book on swords, actually, and discovered that the carbon content of steel
and cast iron is measured by *weight* and not by *volume*.  I could never
understand how such a tiny percentage change in the amount of carbon in the
alloy could make such a huge difference.  Carbon weighs a lot less than
iron, hence a few percentage points increase in carbon - by weight - makes a
significant difference in the amount of carbon - by volume.  Therefore, a
whole bunch more carbon to latch on to in cast iron than steel...and the
original non-stick cooking surface.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve in Houston

10) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
No they are not but they are heavy enough, averaging 10 pounds each and 
large enough to allow vigorous stirring without tossing beans out of 
the wok.
      Jim Gundlach
On Jan 2, 2004, at 3:25 PM, Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Steve Wall
If you can't find a wok that suits you, consider a Whirly-pop popcorn
roaster instead.  I use one of these with a cast iron pan underneath as
heat diffuser and it works great.  I roast in a garage with a turkey 
fryer
burner using propane, for whatever that's worth.  There are good 
instructions
for working a Whirly pop on the sweetmarias website.
Steve Wall
Dave Huddle  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: HeatGunRoast
Tried two types of quality woks, a "professional" heavy steel that I use for food
cooking, and a cast iron bought to try for coffee.  Tried both with barbeque AND
turkey fryerburner.  Preferred steel wok (larger and smooth surface) to the cast
(smaller, rougher surface that was not as pleasant for stirring).  Fryer, as I used
it, was simply overkill--hard to control.  "Big Secret", as Jim indicated is in the
stirring.  This is not exactly brain surgery, easy enough to develop, but no trivial
skill.  I find it easiest to get the right stir and keep the beans in the bowl using
the stick end of a very large wooden spoon----IMO, much better than a larger
stirring surface.  The reason I switched to the ss dogbowls was that they provided a
combination of smooth sides, even distribution of heat, and higher walls to keep a
decent depth of beans without knocking beans out.  (Added the heat gun for more
control and to deal with the variability of the under-source heat.)  But I digress. 
The key is the stirring and whatever mechanical stuff that allows you to the best
job of that.  The other key is to avoid anything designed in a lab to roast corn or
pop coffee.   #:o)
Martin
--- Steve Wall  wrote:
<Snip>http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html=====
Martin
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